The Cornell Lab Bird Academy Discussion Groups Bird Photography with Melissa Groo Practice Gaining an Audience with Birds

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    • Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      Bird_Academy
      Did you try a sit spot, approach birds in a respectful way, or simply observe birds from your home? Were you able to gain an audience with birds? Share what you discovered below.
      You must be enrolled in the course to reply to this topic.
    • Shea
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      runnerboy13
      20201121100057__MG_6356I went into-my local woods to approach the birds respectfully, There was not that much activity in the woods but there was but there was a plethora of activity by the lake, I Found this beautiful hermit thrush eating berries in the shrubs, and it let me get very close!
    • Kate
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      KatePersons
      This course was very helpful in many ways, but the most valuable aspect for me was making a commitment to a sit spot. On June 20 I discovered a Red-throated Loon nest on a tundra pond next to a lane where I could park my car. I returned to the spot every few days, always parking in the exact same place, to observe and photograph the birds from incubation, to hatch of a single chick, through to fledging on Aug. 31. The birds initially were wary of my arrival, but very quickly learned the sound of my car and soon didn’t react at all when I pulled up to my sit spot. I never got out of the car or did anything to alarm them and soon they were carrying out their fascinating lives without worries right in front of my lens and eyes. It was the best part of my summer!C39C940E-7DAD-412A-96A7-31236B36A1D77CB10087-5950-4EC8-A883-0E588DB33C1523B962E7-D4EB-44B4-A107-0BAEE69F1C17
      • Taylor
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        taylorann
        How precious. Were you using a telescopic lens? If so, what was the mm? I'm in the market for one. Taylor Mcglynn
      • Kate
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        KatePersons

        @Taylor Thanks Taylor. These photos were some of the first I took with my big covid-splurge, a Canon 600 mm lens. It’s as awesome as I’d hoped for getting up close and personal to birds without disturbing them. While photographing this loon family, I also often used a 100-400 zoom which worked well in this situation too, especially when the birds were very active since the smaller lens was more maneuverable in the confines of the car.

    • Aidan
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      26keata
      IMG_3189IMG_3234IMG_3241 I photographed these birds in a tree in NY. I love to wait in trees and watch for any type of bird. I am not sure what kinds these birds are and would like some help identifying. I stayed in the tree for about an hour, and then started to walk a local marsh trail.l I got the shots that i wanted. I also found a downey woodpecker nest! I always kept in mind that I should not disrupt the birds and turned out great! I learned A lot about patience and how important it is when coming to bird photography.
    • Cynthia
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Cynthia_Case
      I was out walking and birding in a local regional park that is considered a birding hotspot; however, I was having a ho-hum experience.  Just the usuals for this time of year: Canada Geese, American Coots, House Finches, Lesser Goldfinches, etc.  Nothing new—just birds I’d photographed a million times.  But when I was least expecting it, out by a sand volleyball court, horseshoe pits, and a baseball diamond, I spied a flash of red: A Vermilion Flycatcher!  I’d been looking for this bird for weeks, and there he was, perched on a picnic table.  I fired off some distant shots but was determined to get closer; however, each time I did, he moved away.  In my excitement, I had forgotten to approach slowly, wait until head was down, etc.  He clearly didn’t want me around! When I had calmed down, I sat down in the grass and waited.  And waited.  And then the magic happened.  This beautiful bird, rare in my area, flew right toward me and landed about 15 feet away.  I was able to get some reasonable shots up close.  The light was too harsh, but I got the shots and learned a good lesson in the value of patience.D662C83A-7C9B-411A-BC85-4B62403E5189of patience!
    • Raymie
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      raymie123
      I sat watching the feeders at a local nature preserve. There were plenty of birds, but I think the highlights were the squirrels. They had little fear of me and would pose for photos. The birds were much more skiddish, which may or may not have had to do with the Cooper's Hawk circling above.
    • Shirley
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Shirley1951
      This was in March of 2020.  Was sitting in my car for an hour or more during a cold, rainy & blustery day watching a pair of kestrel falcons off  in the distance feeding and sitting on a wire.  After an hour, with my window down and protecting my camera from the elements, I was shocked to see the male fly down to where the female was sitting and then the rest is history.  I have never witnessed this and it was a capture I won't forget.  It shows what patience and keeping a safe and fairly secluded distance away can provide.DSCN6780 (5)
    • Kendra
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      kcole
      I have a few sit-spots I've been checking out this last month - one is on a forest edge/cliff top near where I know Kingfishers live, in sitting and waiting I've had hummingbirds, warblers, flycatchers, chickadees and nuthatches come by. The other spot is a forest/meadow edge which is busy with cardinals, nuthatches, warblers, and last time a suprise visit of an ovenbird and family of young turkeys who wandered by. I love being able to sit and see which birds happen to come by - my favourite moment is when a wild hummingbird just hovers at face height.
    • Laura
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      LauramcH
      I went to an urban lily pool near me and sat on the stone ledge for 30 minutes in one place.  A few juvenile ducks wandered through the lilies, coming closer to me over time.  At one point, a wood duck rose up, wings spread, when he realized he was only a few feet from me.  Otherwise, it was a peaceful time together.   I moved around the pool to its other side, and a scruffy juvenile mallard approached me, at one point so close I could not focus my camera.  He even walked right behind me, less than a foot away.  I would like to think it was my calm presence that made him feel welcome, but more likely is that at a young age he is already habituated.  I enjoyed the closeness and that he purposely came near to me. In this spot, I also observed a green heron for a long while, hoping to see him fish, but he did not while I was there.   I enjoyed watching the green heron sitting still and attentive for long periods of time, moving only slowly, as that was also what I was practicing!  Wood duck juvenilesMallard JuvenileGreen Heron
    • Francisco
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Paco Mier
      I decided to try to sit on a spot for 3o minutes, staying quiet and without moving. I am a calm person, however it was difficult for me to stay motionless for so long. I visited a coniferous forest, sat on the ground and waited. IMG_0120 (2) After a few minutes I could clearly hear a woodpecker knocking, an acorn woodpecker I suppose.  However there were so many trees that it took me a while to find it on one of the trees! I took several pictures, I was using a Canon with a 500 mm lens and shooting manual. My pics are not so good, the bird was a bit far away up on the tree trunk, and was showing his back to me. I realized that it might convenient to buy an extender and learn how to shoot using properly the camera. I must keep an eye (and ear) for more spots to look for birds and remain quiet there for a while. Suggestions and comments are welcome!
    • Siddhesh
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      virimmune210393
      Well, I have been spending a lot of time in my Virology Lab and had less time for photography. However, I followed the tips and essential field techniques. I also tried to begin from my home where I tried to photograph only sparrows. Another location was a pond a bit close to my home where I photographed ducks. Suggestions and comments are welcome! Thanks, SiddBird1UK_unsigned_JPEGDuck_greyscale_unsigned_JPEGSparrow_unsigned_JPEG
      • Taylor
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        taylorann
        Do you know what the blue bird is? Thanks, Taylor
    • Marcia
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      CaroneMA
      I found two "sit spot" at Presque Isle State Park. This is a Park in Erie, Pennsylvania along the shores of Lake Erie. One of my sit spots was along a wooded area along a road leading to a Boat Launch to the Lake. I have been up and down this road many times but this time I sat and listened and watched for bird activity. I happened to see a Red-headed Woodpecker and then  I saw a second Red-headed Woodpecker. They were very active and I was able to get a couple of pictures of the Red-headed Woodpeckers. I also could hear various bird calls and used my App on my phone to identify which was the call of the Red-headed Woodpecker. For the number of times I have been down this road, this was the first time I have ever had the opportunity to see and observe a Red-headed Woodpecker. A first for me. I then went to area I go to where there is a wildflower field and some berry trees. I go there many times and watch the birds as they eat from the berry trees. I was able to get pictures of an American Robin at this sit spot. Then, when I got home my Mourning Dove was at my feeder. It was at it's usual perch looking over available seed and after making it's observations, it flew down to an area on the ground to eat the seed it had eyed from it's perch. I have included pictures of the Red-headed Woodpecker, and American Robin  with this discussion.0M8A0683a0M8A0746a0M8A0833a
    • Susan E.
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      seferency
      I live within 5 minutes of a secluded cemetary that has two ponds. The photos of the cormorants and the green heron were taken while sitting in my car while parked at the edge of the road. 8DB34475-6471-46BA-B87C-8AA7082C89A2FD9BBED0-0A74-4EEE-B590-43F0C9D972B1
      • Christine
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        CFleuriel
        Wow! Grear shot of the heron!
    • Susan E.
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      seferency
      One of my favorite blinds is my house. I’m able to open the door that leads onto the deck which is near a really old dogwood tree. The photos of the mourning dove and blue jay were taken from the doorway as the birds sat in the tree. For the hawk photo, I had to creep out onto the deck and hid behind the empty flower boxes on the rail. The hawk definitely noticed my presence but stayed for awhile so I was able to grab some photos of him and his breakfast.22E733F7-031D-4913-8394-12A33A02A27D0712A9AF-3E21-4763-B07A-CC4B677DBFFAC6339144-04BA-4779-B4D3-6DABD3794755
    • Cynthia
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      CynthiaDI
      As a relatively new birder, armed with my new camera, I went to my favorite spot from spring migration. I live on a barrier island,  Dauphin Island, Al. This is the first spot of land for many S. & Central American migrants in the spring. This was my first year looking for warblers and the island was hoppin. I was shocked that at times, the trees looked like Christmas trees dotted with colorful Christmas ornaments. Spring was amazing. But today, I learned a very important lesson...spring and July are two totally different animals in South Alabama. I set up my chair and coffee early, as I learned in previous lessons, and waited....and waited. The only things flying were the mosquitos. When I finally did see something, it was behind me, which of course was into the upcoming sunrise. I learned some very important lessons, all getting me closer to becoming a better birder and photographer. 😃       The first picture is my, lets say “artsy” picture, taken into the sun, which was behind me at my “sit spot.” The second picture of the prothonotary warbler was also taken at the same spot, but it was taken during spring migration. We have a spot called “the drip” to provide a spot for warblers to perch and have a drink. It’s the perfect spot for bird viewing right in the middle of a place we call The Shell Mound, a prehistoric Native Indian site. Just wanted you all to see the type of pic I was hoping to take today. 🤣 After an hour, I decided to try for shorebirds/seabirds and moved my “sit spot” to the bay-side of the island. Post to follow. 9240EB68-688A-4974-BCFC-140A431393CE147532C4-A5DB-4B32-85FB-8CFB04527477
      • Susan E.
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        seferency
        I love your warbler photo. I have yet to see one. It will happen one day....
    • Kent
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      hksnake
      The last two months most of the parks I frequent were closed so I started visiting a small marsh near my house. It is very hard to approach from the road so I got there early onr morning with a portable stool and a camo sheet over me. I also spent time sitting on my deck/patio watching the birds that frequent my yard. These are the results.5664 (1 of 1)5608b (1 of 1)6021 (1 of 1)
      • Leslie
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        foss0726
        Love your pictures!
      • Susan E.
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        seferency
        Wonderful images!
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      lindacunico
      _E8A1071_Sky is Falling_7x5_300__E8A3511_Little Miss Sunshine_Since the corona virus has kept me and my husband homebound, I made sit spots in my yard.  On my backyard patio, I figured a large, plump cushioned patio chair would make a decent blind, with me crouched in a second chair behind it!  It worked, as shy Western Tanagers, skittish Bullock's Orioles & cautious Black-headed Grosbeaks -bird species I'd NEVER SEEN BEFORE- didn't seem to notice me there, while bracing my 600mm Tamron lens on the top of the "blind" chair.  I discovered all three species  in my backyard Ash trees for the first time EVER, in mid-March, so I decided to put up a Oriole jelly feeder.  I am elated to say that two different pairs of Bullock's Orioles decided  to nest in the Ash, & I make sure their  jelly feeder is always full.  I now have fledglings, yellow balls of fluff, from one couple, still waiting for arrival of second nestlings, any day now.  I learned feeders have made a huge difference getting birds near perches in my trees. The shy Western Tanager in the photo below stayed a week, thankfully! Lastly, my favorite subjects, Scaled Quail. In this photo, a very young chick is scanning the sky for predators, in between drinks of water.  This is one of  many fascinating behaviors I've observed daily, how fast they depend & learn from their extremely protective & loving  parents.  I have to practice being very quiet, play "Red Light Green Light" all the time, staying low/eye level to the ground.  I crouch, sandwiched between  a wheel barrel  & a very large pot of flowers as a blind in my front yard.  I learned an important lesson from Melissa to not approach birds straight on, so now I practice moving in angled zig-zag motions, when I  follow them into the prairies for environmental photos, as they go about their daily lives.  The weeds are so tall though,  the chicks are hidden._E8A2875_Upside Down Bullock's Oriole_05-1.12.2020_ (1)
      • Lucy
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        Laspade
        Great pics and what a wonderful variety of birds in your yard!
      • Linda
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        lindacunico

        @Lucy Thanks Lucy, makes me happy that you like my photos, and share the joy :).  Just looking out my windows, I see two Canyon Towhees, found in the southeastern part of Colorado according to e-Bird phone app.  But on my Audubon I-phone app, it shows that their range is NOT in my area! Also, I'm  seeing two Curve-billed Thrashers; this species has been my backyard resident for at least ten years. In my Merlin eBird ID mobile  phone app,  it's map shows the Curve-billed Thrasher located ONLY in a MINUSCULE  TIP of SOUTHEASTERN COLORADO.  According to Audubon, they show he's found in southeastern Colorado, BUT not extended in a large enough range to include where I live; they show them in an area concentrated FURTHER  southeast. (I live 5.7 miles away from Lake Pueblo State Park. Last year  I  joined  an Audubon birding group from Colorado Springs who utilize the same apps that I have used for about four years.  Lots of reporting going on!)   So I  hope someday to see updated map range entries,  that would help contribute to birding conservation efforts.

      • Carole
        Participant
        Chirps: 39
        Carole Poustie
        Love your pics! Excellent shots. And those chicks — pretty gorgeous! I must think some more about bird feeders. I have plenty of bird baths but will have to investigate. And think of some 'blinds'. You are very resourceful with yours!
      • Linda
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        lindacunico

        @Carole Many thanks Carole!  Yes, water is extremely important for our birds, but as Melissa has taught & I have discovered is that bird feeders are invaluable way to enjoying birds!   It's true that you will get to know individual bird behaviors just by observing your bird feeders, & really knowing their personalities is special beyond words!  They have really become my pets.   Before I hung this feeder in mid- March, I could only see Scaled Quail from a distance in the tall prairie grasses & weeds.  Now they come to me!  They visit my front yard all day long, from sun-up to sunset, thanks to my feeder!  I love my Duncraft Absolute ll feeder-it has two spring-weighted perches to keep large birds, like pigeons, from eating me out of house and home when I was just throwing seed out to all birds under my piñon  trees.  This Duncraft brand feeder is an all-metal squirrel-proof feeder, although there are NO squirrels in the area where I live.  When a large bird or squirrel steps on the perch, a metal shield drops down to shut off the seed supply.  I enjoy watching birds from two separate perches on either side of this feeder.  The metal overhanging roof protects my birds from sun, rain and snow.  the roof also  lifts up for easy  refilling & cleaning.  I have seen very smart Grackles figure out that by fluttering on an edge of the perch, they could hang on and get a couple of mouthfuls.  They eventually give up, figuring it was no work just to find seeds on the ground underneath this feeder that the smaller birds scattered for them and many other ground feeders.  Different birds like different feeders, just as we saw in Melissa's video. Doesn't matter if your bird feeders are homemade or bought, just get some Carole, you won't regret it!

      • Carole
        Participant
        Chirps: 39
        Carole Poustie

        @Linda I will! 😊😊😊

    • Leslie
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      foss0726
      I have not been able to go to a sit spot yet, but I have been able to sit on my deck overlooking our lake in the Adirondack Mountains in Upstate NY.  I heard some Cedar Waxwings, Song Sparrows and a Robin fighting for some time in an Elderberry bush down by the lake.  I was able to go sit in the front of our boat and wait for them to get their turn at the bush.  The Robin was the ruler of the berries.  I was able to get some shots of the Cedar Waxwings and Song Sparrows.  Unfortunately the bush has been picked clear and the Cedar Waxwings have moved on.IMG_4035 (2)IMG_4072 (2)IMG_3886
      • Lucy
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        Laspade
        Great pics! I love the interactive shot!
      • Leslie
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        foss0726

        @Lucy Thank you.

      • Carole
        Participant
        Chirps: 39
        Carole Poustie
        Great photos! Really captivating.
    • Lucy
      Participant
      Chirps: 24
      Laspade
      Question: Is there a way to get notifications when someone posts to the topic or replies to my post? Thanks DSC_0575e
      • Leslie
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        foss0726
        Beautiful picture!
      • Linda
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        lindacunico
        Gorgeous Blue Grosbeak, he's on my bucket list!  I really like the drift wood, makes a lovely, natural setting!
    • Lucy
      Participant
      Chirps: 24
      Laspade
      I work from home so I added a couple of items to my yard that the birds land on before going to a feeder or bird bath to help me get more natural photos. First I have some stands made with wood and PVC pipe so I can stick a branch in and place near feeders or bird bath. Second I got some drift wood and ran a drip line behind so the will still drip into the bath and the wood gives a good place for birds to sit while waiting their turn. I can easily edit out the drip tube if it shows up in a photo. I am posting photos of one of my stands and the main drip bath. I live in a regular neighborhood so nothing fancy about my yard. I have moved the bath several times because I have discovered that the birds love the small persimmon tree for cover and the bath works best there. I have watched the birds long enough to know that some come during particular timed during the day and year. IMG_7438IMG_5028DSC_9353e
      • Lucy
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        Laspade
        Here is a Summer tanager sitting on the stand. DSC_0554e
    • Carole
      Participant
      Chirps: 39
      Carole Poustie
      I went to our local 'Blue Lake' today an hour or so before sunset to make the most of the beautiful late afternoon light. Also I'm still very much learning how to get crisp photos with my camera and lens, so ducks, water fowl and cormorants don't flit around very fast and are great subjects to practise on! The down side is that lots of people use the lake to walk around for their exercise so lining up a shot can be a bit fraught! But I thought I'd take my chances as I know there will definitely be birds there. I thought if I sat in one particular spot where I've photographed pied cormorants before I might get lucky. They can do some interesting gymnastics with their necks. I got a couple of shots of Eurasian Coots and yes — a pied cormorant presented him/herself — but then a wonderful surprise awaited me! The light was getting low and I was just about to pack up when I looked up to see a Nankeen Night-Heron fly in to a tree right in front of me. One of my favourite birds! And I haven't seen one for ages! People around must have thought I was crazy I got so excited. Anyway, here are the photos! I'm on the Bellarine Peninsula in Victoria Australia just to the west of Port Philip Bay.   Carole's Birds-2Carole's Birds-4Carole's Birds-3
      • Isabelle
        Participant
        Chirps: 58
        oiseaulune
        Thanks Carole for the great story. I love your photos, especially the Nankeen Night-Heron, it is very peaceful.
      • Lucy
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        Laspade
        Wonderful shots! Congrats!
      • Linda
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        lindacunico
        Thank you for sharing wonderful photos of Australian birds, and I always like to hear a good story!  I take photos at a small lake near my home where there are American Coots, who have yellow-green feet &  American Coots' beaks aren't totally white.
    • Elizabeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Burtnerl
      I went to our Botanical Garden and found a few different places to sit. Discovered some nesting house wrens, Lazuli buntings which are still singing-I'm not sure if they are defending territory or not. One was preening and rousting while I took photos, so felt he wad pretty comfortable with me. Then saw a female Bullock's Oriole chase away a male Black-nIBG July 6 2020-7IBG July 6 2020-9IBG July 6 2020-5ecked hummingbird, and blurred the photo on both.
    • helen
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      neilhelenjoe
      Enjoyed the latest lesson so headed out early this morning to a local bayou.  Confess to not sitting for 30 minutes in one spot but have found a couple of spots to try again tomorrow for a longer period of time.  Here’s a few shots 58A36169-A8BC-4F38-B8D0-D81A9A9B23E271B29061-6D9A-4BDC-AC44-6ACD5CB69C81D68AA347-AD20-468F-98A7-910266FE5244
      • Elizabeth
        Participant
        Chirps: 21
        Burtnerl
        You must live in Florida. :-) Love the Snowy Egret
      • helen
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        neilhelenjoe

        @Elizabeth I wish!  Actually live in Houston, Texas! Thanks for your comment!

      • Christine
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        CFleuriel

        @helen Do you go over to Anahuac? We spent most of a week last December on the TX Gulf Coast, starting there and going South. Birding was the sole purpose of the vacation.

      • Carole
        Participant
        Chirps: 39
        Carole Poustie
        Wow! Great shots!
      • helen
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        neilhelenjoe

        @Carole Thank you 😊

      • Lucy
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        Laspade
        Great Pics! The Roseate Spoonbills are one of my favorites!
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      kwilles
      Ever since I read Melissa’s 2016 article in Outdoor Photographer about having a Sit Spot, I have been able to describe to others why I will often stay in one place for quite a while.  The images below were taken at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in Florida, 25-miles south of Tallahassee on June 19, 2020 during my Sit Spot time of 11:00 AM to Noon.  I chose that place in particular because I knew that Clapper Rails and chicks had recently been seen.  I could hear them but couldn’t see them as they were back in the marsh.  Then, much to my delight, an adult and chick appeared.  During that hour, I photographed an immature male Boat-tailed Grackle, a small flock of immature White Ibises, and an adult female Boat-tailed Grackle in addition to the Clapper Rail and chick. 9E60E2DB-FB90-4100-BB01-96601A308007B0D546B4-7B5B-4FF3-9817-7A48D144489803DADBDA-760C-4739-A8DB-C0C7CCC1B071
      • Karen
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        kwilles
        Only 3 images are allowed for upload so here are the other 3 images — Two are of the immature mail Boat-tailed Grackle and the other is of the adult female Boat-tailed Grackle that landed in the palmetto tree right above me.  When I looked at the downloaded images I could see the landscape behind me reflected in her eye.  Nice bonus! C20F37C5-456D-4D8C-B7A7-E885F8D2F82B21C86AE4-FB97-486B-A293-8468B8788C27 9E1BAE75-BBDE-4182-9CE4-C63DA5427300
      • Isabelle
        Participant
        Chirps: 58
        oiseaulune

        @Karen Beautiful photos!

      • Carole
        Participant
        Chirps: 39
        Carole Poustie

        @Karen LOVE that first shot! That eye! Beautiful!

      • Lucy
        Participant
        Chirps: 24
        Laspade
        Great job on the pics and lucky you to get the rails!
    • Isabelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 58
      oiseaulune
      This morning I went to my favorite regional park, in North California, it has lots of little lakes, ponds and arroyos connecting them. It is the perfect habitat to give shelter to a lot of bird species. I found a green heron on a branch sticking out of the water, turning its back to me. I tried to practice a careful, silent approach as Melissa explained, getting closer each time his attention was distracted (by a plane passing or a dog barking). When I was close enough to have a decent shot with my 400 lens, I decided to crouch down and wait. I expected to stay here quite a long time (green herons can keep very still for ages but when they but strike all of a sudden, they can be very fast). My camera settings were ready. I will share below some photos of what I saw. The first is when I arrived. In the second, he noticed something in the water and elongated its neck slowly (it always surprise me how long it can get). After coming back to his waiting position for a while he suddenly jumped in the water to fish, turned around as fast as he had jumped and landed back on the log. I press the shutter trying to keep my focus and got some very interesting shots. I am glad I stopped and spent time with this amazing bird.DSCF3729DSCF3760DSCF3823
      • Elizabeth
        Participant
        Chirps: 21
        Burtnerl
        That last shot is so cool
      • Isabelle
        Participant
        Chirps: 58
        oiseaulune

        @Elizabeth Thank you Elizabeth!

      • Carole
        Participant
        Chirps: 39
        Carole Poustie
        Fantastic sequence of photos — especially that last one! — and story to go with it. Thanks for sharing!
      • Isabelle
        Participant
        Chirps: 58
        oiseaulune

        @Carole Thank you Carole, glad you enjoyed it:)

    • Edwin
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      eomcfarlane
      I often walk to a local park which has a lake and other bird friendly habitat.  Even though it is close to a busy street/highway, birds do not seem to be disturbed by the traffic.  I go there and find a place to just sit and look over the lake and the edge of the lake.  One day I was sitting there and watching a Great Egret feeding on the far side of the lake.  I patiently sat and watched as the Egret made its way closer and closer to where I was.  I was able to get this shot and found it quite rewarding to see it feeding and to capture that activity in my photo.  The lighting was such that I was also able to get the reflection.  I was also able to get a photo of a Great Blue Heron along the lake's edge._Y7A7608_Y7A7595
      • Carole
        Participant
        Chirps: 39
        Carole Poustie
        Great you got the reflections!
    • Drew
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      drewdog
      I saw there was a sparrow visiting a feeder, so I sat in a chair about 30 feet away, with the sun at my back. I took various shots of the feeder, trying different modes (manual, shutter priority, etc.) and ISO levels to optimize the light. I waited about 30 minutes but the bird didn't return. I was too close and too obvious. Although I moved some, I didn't make any sudden movements. It gave me a sense that I need to work harder to get well positioned.
    • Mark
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      hallmarkf
      Near my backyard feeder, there is a fence, a brush pile, two potted plants, and an evergreen bush. Birds will often perch on these, or in a nearby maple tree, while awaiting a turn at the feeder or to retreat to with their meal.
    • Rob
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      robshapiro
      What lens support does Melissa use when shooting from a low position on the beach?  It appears to be saucer shaped.
      • Isabelle
        Participant
        Chirps: 58
        oiseaulune
        In Lesson 2, in the section called Understand tripod, Melissa mentions at the end that she uses Ground pods, in particular the Skimmer Pod from NatureScapes. That could be the one.
      • Rob
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        robshapiro

        @Isabelle Isabelle, thank you!  I checked out NatureScapes and it is a ground pod.

      • William
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        williamyontz
        It appears that you use AF rather than manual?
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