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Active Since: August 11, 2016
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  • Karen
    Participant
    kzelez
    No. I live in an area where skies are often gray, so these perfect photos are not what I usually see. I have never seen a Brewer's Blackbird. I have to travel a long way for Boat-tailed or Great-tailed Grackles. My binoculars rarely give me a look at the eye which helps with Grackle ID, and I have great binoculars. Birds in flight will always be a struggle and with Crows there is the need to learn wing motion to decide if you have a distant crow or a raptor.  So, no confidence with flight.  Of the birds you selected we get cowbirds, red-wings, Common Grackles, Crows.
    in reply to: Crow Not Crow #785750
  • Karen
    Participant
    kzelez
    I don't get opportunities for Ravens around here. But I know most of the different characteristics. My issue is always the bird in flight. The pointier wing is new to me. Still working on the tail shape and neck differences. I ID more by sound when I bird and I have a lot to learn
    in reply to: Crow Not Crow #785706
  • Karen
    Participant
    kzelez
    1. People have strong opinions about all sorts of wildlife, and just like we have experienced in politics, you will not change their minds. My immediate neighbor rarely notices wildlife, but for the most part the opinions are negative. But I keep trying. I was fascinated to read about which animals are guilty of nest predation, since I have recognized for a while now, that most wildlife eat whatever they can get. There are fewer vegetarians out there than we think. I was mildly surprised about White-tailed deer, but hunger and opportunity generally win. I'd love to learn more. I really think a dislike of Corvids is something people form early. They don't like large, noisy flocks of birds during migration covering the lawns and trees, and many think of birds as dirty. I accept all birds, even our two invasives - European Starlings and House Sparrows.  I know this is an unpopular opinion. And there is nothing I can do about hordes of squirrels living where I do and with the number of trees around, so they all get to eat.   2 & 3. In Northeast Ohio, where I live, our Corvids are generally limited to American Crows and Blue Jays. However, in the winter, there are a few shopping plazas that are visited by large flocks of American Crows and within 20 miles of my home, Fish Crows.  Much closer to me - 10 minutes - we have had Fish Crows as well. I like to visit the plaza and listen to the Crows since a Fish Crow is hard to distinguish from an American Crow unless they are immediately adjacent. In my local patch we have a smaller roost area that I have not located. I just see the large flock rising at certain times of day. Ravens sometimes visit in Ohio, but I did not find them when I visited their reported site. On the other hand I have very poor skills in flight ID. I keep working on it. 4. I benefit from Corvids. I love the different calls they make. I have a Blue Jay near me who has been mastering his Red-shouldered Hawk call (it's fooling me more each year) and witnessed a Jay with a Titmouse song that was truly perfect. An actual titmouse was responding to it.  If I use Jays and Crows to clue me in about possible raptors and owls, it's obvious the other creatures do as well. I get more Jays giving warnings than Crows, and the birds always react. If it's really a serious threat, the crows pile in and even the smaller songbirds will fly to the possible enemy to harass and chirp.  Crows and Jays also do this to clear the feeders so they can take over.  It's always a good day when there is so much to observe
    in reply to: What is a Crow? #785701
Viewing 3 posts - 1 through 3 (of 3 total)