• Faith
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Yes appears to be many different things that help you distinguish the difference . Size ,color of eyes  colors on body and tail feathers / shape  beaks
    • Robert
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Yes, for the most part. But the crows around here in the Alberta Boreal are large. I've been listening mornings to a young family of ravens (judging only by sound). The fledgelings sound like crow caws, but when the adult chimes in, it's more of a cronk. I wouldn't bet the farm on identifying by sound.
      • Susan
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        Agreed re: sound of fledglings - I've never heard crow fledglings, but the raven chicks, I've heard a lot - and fledglings make a very loud begging cry, like crow caws but coninuous, similar in mien to other begging baby birds. The adult ravens make cronks but I've heard them make some other rattling sounds, soft krunks,  and alarm cronks.  Crows I identify by caws, and they are more apt to make sounds than the adult ravens.
    • Douglas
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Ravens are notably larger and have pointier tales and wings as well as a longer hooked beak
    • charlene
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Yes I feel confident in identifying crows
    • Roseann
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I do see crows regularly (lots of them) and ravens less often, but still somewhat regularly (usually just one or two at a time). The first time I saw a raven in my area he was standing among a  group of crows and seagulls that I was feeding (he was hanging back a bit). At first I thought, that's a very large crow, as body-wise he was as large as a seagull... of course it wasn't a large crow, it was a raven. I got up to speed after that in telling the difference between the two. Sometimes it's harder at a distance, unless I hear their call... that's a real give-away.
    • Jeanne
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I see both crows and ravens here in N California and have now learned to tell them apart by size and tail.
    • Fred A.
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Yes I can tell the difference.
    • Barbara
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I’m not sure if there are Ravens here on the Monterey Bay, but I’m going to find out and if there are I will try to identify them.
    • karima
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      The crow's facial features like eye and beak shape are different!
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      We don't have ravens in North Florida, so I don't need to distinguish between crows and ravens at home, but when traveling I can usually tell them apart by size and beak shape. I didn't know that ravens have longer throat feathers and that will be helpful for close up IDs in the future. Sometimes it's challenging to distinguish crows from grackles when they're flying. We also have Fish Crows, which I can distinguish from American Crows by their call.
      • Susan
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        I can't tell the difference between the common crow and the fish crow - I see both around the beach but don't know which is which or what sound the fish crow might make.
      • Elizabeth
        Participant
        Chirps: 9

        @Susan YouTube "fish crow call" - the sound is very distinctive!!

    • Allan
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      The beak size and shape along with the eye coloring were two of the key identifiers that I took away from this lesson.
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I am getting better at noticing beak size, eye color and tail shape/size. In New Jersey there are no ravens but plenty of grackles, red wings, cow birds and starlings. In flight is my biggest challenge.
      • Susan
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        I read that there are ravens in NJ now. I have seen them in NYC (as have other people) and they do "krunk" and when they fly they are usually high - hawk level - and that's how I know they are ravens as they size is comparable to a red-tailed hawk. Crows are smaller and they hang in gangs.
    • Catherine
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I'm confident in being able to distinguish between crows and ravens. I've only seen a raven in captivity but the size difference was amazing. I have actually heard a crow that sounded a lot like a raven. His voice was totally different from all the other crows in my area (SF Bay Area).
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I m fairly confident with these pictures, but will probably have more trouble distinguishing crows from ravens in reality.
    • Jeni
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I'm fairly confident in my ability to distinguish crows from ravens. I do so mostly by their call - caw and cronk. Ravens where I live are markedly bigger than crows. I look for the scruffy neck feathers to identify the raven.
    • Jonquele
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      I don't have much trouble separating the crows from the grackles and blackbirds when they are perched or nearby... and none at all when they are calling. I do run into issues though when they are in flight and at a distance. Then I am more like to confuse them with the vultures (black or turkey) until they turn or glide. I don't quite have the wingbeat patterns down or the silhouettes. The very strong light in Texas can wash out a lot of the telltale details.
    • Kathryn
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I noticed that the crow's eyes are black, too. That helped me distinguish between them and the other birds on some of the close-up head shots.  I had more trouble identifying them in flight from a distance or by silhouette.
    • Amanda
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I'm pretty good distinguishing crow from non-crow/raven; but between a crow and a raven in real life, not still pictures, I'm a little shaky. It doesn't help that there aren't many ravens in this area for me to practice on. I appreciate the tips from this lesson, though. I'll be sure to put them into practice when I go birding in the future.
    • J
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I am confident in my ability to distinguish between crows (or ravens) and non-crows/ravens. My ability to discriminate crows from ravens when perched or on the ground is also fairly solid, less so in flight which is how we often see them here in canyon country (southeast Utah). Habitat, habits and calls are helpful but unless seen flying solo or in pairs along canyon walls (ravens) or as a "murder" (crows) I frequently find it difficult to decide what I'm looking at. Although we are shown as being on the edge of their range, American crows are often seen here in large numbers.
      • Desiree
        Participant
        Chirps: 16
        I have a very hard time in general identifying birds in flight. Crows aren’t too difficult for me in New Orleans where I live, but I’m sure if I lived where you do with crows and ravens I wouldn’t be able to tell the difference until I heard their calls. I love your advice about watching to see how they group together and where they go. I did not know ravens are usually single or in pairs!
      • J
        Participant
        Chirps: 2

        @Desiree In my limited experience (although with many years of canyon hiking behind me), I've often seen ravens soaring along or above the canyon walls. In springtime, we frequently see them as pairs. They like to nest in sheltered alcoves or openings on the cliff faces. They'll often perch on a dead snag or rock ledge where they command a good view.

    • Ron G.
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I’m still having trouble with ravens and crows.  If I see a small flock - say 5 -  does that mean it can’t be a raven?
      • Susan
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        That's interesting! Where are you seeing them? I always see ravens - in Reykjavik - and in the countryside - and in NYC - as single or pairs. Never flocks, but I've seen young ravens in a flock in the winter (a friend feeds them!). I always assume a flock is crows - I often see a flock feeding on someone's lawn, or mobbing each other over food items on the building roof across from me in NYC.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      I am confident that I can distinguish crows from other birds (though perhaps not yet from ravens) especially the babies, although I doubt that I will ever get that close. "Our" fledgling was walking about on our porch as a friend arrived for dinner. Oh! the out cry from parents and relatives as he approached! I wish I had seen the youngster.
    • DLadetto
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Sometimes from a distance I’ll see a crow or a grackle walking by itself picking at stuff in the lawn. From a distance, when you can’t gauge size, they still seem confusing to me. However, I’ll try to pay more attention to see if there are posture, walking, or behavioral differences I can spot.
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I'm not as good as I'd like to be in distinguishing a Crow from a Raven.  I think I just need more experience and/or practice.  The lesson was clear.  I do better on your photo ID quizzes when the bird comparison is from the same aspect.
    • karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I am confident in my ability to distinguish crows from ravens, however, we do not have ravens where I live.