• Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      What was most interesting or surprising to you about the crow research team’s methods?
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    • Gabriel
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Crows living up to 19 years in the wild & the big colored tags put on them. I wonder if the tags affect them in some way. I imagine it would be easier for prey to notice them with their colored tags.
    • Deborah
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Monitoring the individuals into old age.  Fascinating
    • John
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      This is less about the methodology and more about the results:  the age of crows, especially here in New York.  I had heard that they lived beyond ten, but not that they lived well into their teens.  To be an older teen and still productive is pretty amazing as well.  The multiple banding makes sense, as many animals wear out/break tags in farming.  So it isn't surprising that each method has its limitations.
    • Larry
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I loved learning about and seeing crows' nests.  The process and success of identifying crows was surprising and very clever.
    • Elisabeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Fascinating process!  Wonder if you ever have opportunities for interested members of the public to observe and/or assist?!
    • MaryBeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      efforts to assess and monitor as individuals. did not realize that crows lived that long or that they are born w blue eyes
    • Mike
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      I was surprised at how in depth the crows are identified, marked and followed during their life cycle.  The longevity of crows was surprising given how tough living in the wild must be.
    • Rachel
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I found the tag half-life information really interesting! I knew birds were banded/tagged with multiple IDs, but I always wondered how long the tags lasted. Is there any evidence that the birds (or other animals) eat the tags after they fall off? The colorful plastic bands remind me of the Pacific Ocean garbage patch and the unfortunate number of birds who eat or feed their chicks the caps and other debris thinking it's fish.
    • Michelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      This isn't an answer to the above question, but I wonder why crows don't reuse their nests in upstate New York? I've had the privilege of getting to know my backyard crows (in Red Deer Alberta, Canada) for the last 15 years. I feed them and they sometimes leave "sparkly treasures" for me :) I noticed one of the crows is getting white feathers on it's left wing like JG in the study so I assume it is age related.
    • John
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      Use of peanuts and tree climbing. The big tags also.
    • Laura
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I had no idea that crows live so long!
    • Gracklefeeder1
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      That the birds don't try and get the tags off.
    • Pauline
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      It is wonderful to know that you can get to know birds as individuals, from when they were in an egg until their death. I would guess that there is sadness when a bird that you have known all their life dies. And also, thank you for telling us where in trees we might see a crow's nest!
    • Kurt
      Participant
      Chirps: 29
      It was interesting that the teams need to look for new nest every year, as American Crows do not re-use their nests. The wing tags seemed large, and I wonder if there was any change to flying patterns as a result? I wonder, using radio and tag tech, what did you learn  bout how far a crow will leave its territory...do some travel hundreds of miles away and stay there?
    • Veronica
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      It was interesting to learn why you used the wing tags as well as the leg bands.  I also found it interesting to learn that they do not return to the same nest and that they nest so high up at the top of the trees.  This year I hear them frequently in the woods behind one of the neighbors, and it makes me wonder if the nest is up in one of the white pines.  Thank you for the fascinating information.
    • The big tags!  I didn't know anything about their nests.  I'll have to search some out in the field.
    • MG
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      The size of the ID tags were  quite noticable.   I wonder if this affects behavior.
    • Marc
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      The tags seem to be a little large.
    • I had heard about the different tagging methods.  Seeing them and hearing about some details (e.g., age, individuality) added context.  Learning about the crow's nesting sites will/may help me to see more of them, as I hike around the area (and around the cemetery).
    • I didn't know where they tend to nest toward the tops of tall trees. That info will be a big help in finding their nests (I hope).
    • Charlotte
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I'm surprised you don't use microchips to follow the birds
    • Barbara
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      How difficult the nest is to find.  How many nestlings are in the clutch.
    • Cynthia
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I was just reading that old school thought was that research animals should not be given names.  Tags are essentially names and obviously vital to your research.
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      That the tags and bands in many cases lasted throughout the life of the crow and let the team know how long lived these birds are.