• Jackie
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I found it interesting that they have a hard time finding the nests each year due to the fact that the crows don’t go back to the same nest.
    • Maureen
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      It's awesome to hear that some crows you have researched have lived to be 19 years old! What is the oldest crow you have followed/researched?
      • Elizabeth
        Bird Academy
        The oldest crows were the 19 year olds. They have had four individuals reach 19.
    • Julia
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I didn't realize that the crow research team followed individual crows for so long and had such an intricate understanding of the relationship between crows in the study area.
    • G
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Wish I could watch that video, so far none of the videos have been available
      • G
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        alright so turns out it was an issue with the Wi-Fi permissions stopping me from seeing Vimeo videos.
    • Erin
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      I was happy to learn the purpose of the wing tags, they seem so large, though clearly the crows are not bothered by them. There are 2 - 9 crows in my neighbourhood that I see daily and come to my feeders, oh my goodness I would love to know who is who! I think I can tell about two fairly confidently based on behaviour, but there is no way to know. I was also happy to learn how long they live. I had heard they could live a very long time in captivity, but I did not know they also have long lives in the wild. What a wonderful thing to study, they are really wonderful and amazing birds.
    • Debra
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      The number of Identifiers used.
    • Pat
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I was delighted to learn that crows have a long longevity.  I have one famil that comes to my feeder on a regular basis and brings its young to it every spring.  The one crow has developed a dime sized white spot on it'a right wing.  I did not know that the babies have blue eyes.  So pleased to learn about the leg bands.  I have photographs of several birds with various leg bands and wondered about them.  One had 3 leg bands.  Thank you for the information.
    • It was interesting to know that young crows have blue eyes. Never observed this before but I will look for it next time I'm observing crows to see if I can use that as a cue to deduce age. Also, the analogy about the "crow's nest" on ships to describe where crows typically place nests was very good - will definitely help me remember where to spot crow nests. Very interesting to see how researchers are able to track individual crows for such extended periods of time.
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      I never knew that people could have so many ways to identify one bird! I think it is amazing that you manage to catch these beautiful birds and, even after their tags have fallen off, have ways to recognize them years later!
    • Ellen
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      I didn't know that young crows had blue eyes. I did think it was fascinating to learn just how much data about the crows has been collected over 30 years. It was also very interesting to learn about the various bands and identification markers used, and how long they lasted (I'm actually surprised that some of them last 10 years or more).
    • Chuck
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Thomas Earnest Seaton in "Wild Animals I Have Know" (I think that was the name of the book).  I read it a long, long time ago and have appreciated cows because of his story. He reported on his research, using a crow renamed as "Silver Spot". How much of what he wrote has been found to be true and false?
    • Sheila
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      The most interesting thing is that you take the babies out of the nest.  Where are the parents while you are doing this? I didn't think crows would have as long of lifespan as you stated.  I was thinking more in the 10 year range.
    • alice
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      While I’m not surprised that the research team follows as complete a life cycle as possible - i never realized that crows life span was so long!  Additionally, i am surprised that baby birds can be taken, tagged and returned to the nest without ill effects.  That makes me happy.  I am guessing when you can tag these birds - you get to know their personality a bit more - and then the social interaction...perhaps getting ahead of myself on that presumption.  I will start looking for a crow’s nest next time in in area i know have many crows...now that i know where to look... i may get lucky..
    • Edward
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      The bloodletting.
    • Ruth
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      What we found interesting was that the parents of the baby birds who were removed, banded etc accepted the baby birds afterwards. Our understanding is that parent birds will reject those that have been handled by humans.
      • Erin
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        When I started volunteering at a wildlife rehabilitation centre about ten years ago, I was so glad to learn that is a complete myth! After many years of putting baby birds back in nests, I can confirm it totally is!
    • Jonathan
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I recently read The Genius of Birds and realized I hadn't thought of birds as individuals - I really thought everything was driven by instinct and that one bird was pretty much a substitute for another. This research reinforces that. I also didn't realize that Crows live that long, or that their feathers turn white as they age.
    • Earl
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I am glad to learn that crows can live beyond a few years.  I helped raise a baby crow when I was young, and when she left and flew away with other crows, I always wondered what happened to her and how long she may have lived.  her name was "Ima" and I taught her to say, "Ima crow!"
    • Marie-Paule
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I didn't know that their nests are at the very top of a tree.
    • Lorraine
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      The longevity of crows is much greater than I ever imagined!
    • Michael
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I wouldn’t have imagined that so much emphasis is placed on identifying and following individual crows from egg to death. The multiple and redundant “names” and forms of identification were also surprising and interesting. Finally, I was also surprised to learn that newly hatched crows are naked and have blue eyes until maturity!
    • Suzan
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I was most surprised to learn that blood sampling is the method for determining gender.  I was also surprised to learn that the bands often do not last the lifetime of the birds.
    • Sara
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      It's amazing that you're able to follow so many individual crows! I'm looking forward to learning about their family life and how they socialize with other crows.
    • It was interesting how thorough they are, and how they had the ability to track whole families. I am curious as to if the wing tags and radio antennas impact the crows' behavior.
      • Chelsea
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        I am curious about the same thing.
    • Diana
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I was surprised that they live so long, although parrots also have great longevity, and they are also a remarkably intelligent group.  I wonder if there is a correlation.
      • That is a good point. I would be interested in any studies paralleling life expectancy with intelligence as well.
    • Karrin
      Participant
      Chirps: 47
      I am not sure I found anything surprising about their methods. Wait, I take that back - I thought it was surprising that the research teams have already gone through all of the possible letter / number combinations TWICE. What was interesting to me was learning how to identify crows' nests and that baby crows have blue eyes.