• Greg
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Most interesting is the dedication of research throughout the life of the bird and the fact that it can possibly be a couple of decades! It's also interesting that the individuality of the birds can be learned.
    • Jen
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      The fact that the crows in the study are given 2 bands as well as a wing tag. If I saw a crow with a wing tag I would think that something was wrong with it, and that it had become entangled in something. Also that you have to draw blood to sex the birds.
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      The way you follow them for their entire lives was a surprise to me. Also how many tags they have.
    • Pamela
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      The length of time that the researchers studied the individual birds and got to know them, even without their tags.
    • james
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      The wing tags and the radio wires on their backs. They look uncomfortable for the crows.  But i know the researchers care about their birds and so im sure it must not bother them too much. also i did not know that crows got white feathers when they got older. Even though there is probably a measureof academic detachment, it must be sad for the researchers when a crow disappears and never comes back. I would be sad after spending so much time with them
    • Barbara
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      I did not realize that the birds wore multiple identifiers. I am sure getting good visuals on the nests is not an easy task. Would use of a drone be more feasible?
    • TF
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Lifespan - In the past, I'd believe it was a lot shorter.   Good to know.    Makes me happy they live longer.
    • Alicia
      Participant
      Chirps: 24
      I was most surprised to hear that individual crows are tracked for so many years! It must be heartbreaking for the researchers to lose a bird after spending so much time with it.
    • Via
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Amazing lifespan!
    • sherise
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I had no idea that crows live so long. I also was surprised by the size of the wing tags.
    • Stephen
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      From eggs to grave.
    • Cara
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      The ability to age the crows and the longevity of the crows.
    • Rachel
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      That they do wing tags. I love crows.
    • Somers
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I was struck by the longevity of the crows and the steadfastness of the researchers over many years. It also surprised me that the researchers could examine baby crows so thoroughly, with such a variety of procedures, and then return them to the nest to pursue life as a nestling unperturbed. I wonder if the encounters and procedures remain in the birds' memories or affect their future behavior in any discernible way. In later years do they talk to each other about having been kidnapped by aliens...?
    • Elle
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I was surprised at the wing ID tags, which seemed large and very noticeable, and I wondered if the crows payed any attention to them. The longevity of the crows was also very interesting to learn, however most crows unfortunately won’t reach old age due to accidents.
    • ilona
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      My neighbor crows sometimes build a fake nest and then the actual nest they lay their eggs in. The real nest is always in an evergreen, like the ones in the film. They live much longer than I thought.
    • Diana
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      The methods to track these birds are amazing. I’m also surprised about where they make their nests, and their longevity, and their white feathers, as they age. It’s really interesting that they have such different personalities. The pictures really help in identification. I’m in Western NY. I would love to spot one of those tagged crows in my field! 
      • Jamie
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        The white feathers were a real surprise to me too! How interesting that they show similar signs of aging as other sentient beings. I hope you see a tagged crow someday!
    • William
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Two interesting things - how long the crow lives and where they nest. I now have an idea of where to look for them. Being at the center top of a tree and the crow's nest on sailing ships, how things are named is always interesting.
    • Kyra
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      -I was surprised by the age of the birds. I've worked with banding birds before so I am familiar with the process. I also learned where to look for their nests.
    • Mark
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      Neat that your records include which birds specifically they ate with when they were juveniles. I find it fascinating that these birds' life stories are being recorded.
    • Kim
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      The wing ID tags seem very large and my initial reaction was given the bird's intelligence, I wondered if they noticed them or were bothered by them.
    • Jeanne
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      The biggest and best surprise to me was that the researchers didn't use gloves in handling the baby or adult crows. Obviously it didn't affect the parent crows reaction to their babies after they had been handled.
    • Alice
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      The biggest surprise was how many different ways the birds are banded
    • Barbara
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      How many forms of identification they utilize.  Also that they sometimes use radio on the birds is interesting. I didn’t know that great horned owls used their nests.
    • Robert
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      The fact that they triple tag them, which of course makes sense since they have such a long life expectancy. That they can identify them by their behavior and other characteristics when or if the tags eventually fall off or wear off. That they make their nests high up in the center of tall trees and don't reuse them.