• Student Birder
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      I redid my marsh wren using proportion techniques and also did the snail shell drawing.  then I drew a towhee based on a photo a friend took.  I worked on proportion and had to draw it several times.  Then i decided to add the rust color of the towhee and it looks a little strange when i scanned it.  Anyway using my pencil or fingers for measuring proportion is great.  I tried it when i walked in the park just to get an idea of size,  and I'll try it an outside drawing next.  Snail shellsMarsh wrentowhee
    • Betty
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      The negative space and proportional measurement practices are more difficult.  I've used the arms length measurements before but wasn't sure what I was looking for when I did it.  I used that process on drawing the barn owl from a photo I took last month at a Sportsman's Show we went to in the area.  One of the locals is a birds of prey rehabilitator and she comes to many events near where I live and I was able to get some good shots of a barn owl as she walked with it near me. He was absolutely beautiful.  The negative space practice was pretty easy for me, I enjoyed this lesson a lot, it was lots of fun.Nature Journal_neg_space2Barn Owl_great swamp~2Barn Owl_Great Swamp
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        Cool owl drawing, you really captured it!
      • Susan
        Participant
        Chirps: 30

        @Avery Beautiful portrait of the owl!

    • Juan
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      Is very useful because help you to have another perspective of things. Yes. Yes because all is perspective. image1 (1)
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        Lovely rose, you really captured the bending petals well. Leaves are nice too.
    • joyce
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      image
    • Curt & Jeanne
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      I had forgotten that proportion trick. I know I used it a long time ago. Thanks for refreshing my memory.
    • Gail
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      I found using the measuring proportion technique very effective and gives me a great tool to make sure my illustration are more accurate and proportionally correct.   Queen Anne's Lace
      • joyce
        Participant
        Chirps: 10
        Very nice. I like the way you captured the light petals.
    • I call this, “Ok, you can look now”  learning the proportions trick helped me a lot to get close to the shape I was drawing  4646DAD1-03C4-47E0-A58F-9D1C60E686A256C5BF7C-12CC-4C8C-9F9D-35C5836870C8E3772A6F-9D97-48AD-96C1-1A8412A3BF5E
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        I love your cat and your drawings.
    • Heidi
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      I used the proportion technique to draw two marsupials that were outside my tent at a recent campsite in Northern Tasmania.  I used the length of the head as my initial measurement.  It made me realize that the Tasmanian Pademelon is a very round animal!  It also has a proportionally larger head to body size, which might be because this was a very young animal, but the Bennett's Wallaby was an adult.  The negative shapes helped to draw the legs more accurately than I ever have before!  I live in Tasmania, so have tried to draw these species a few times before but have greatly improved with these techniques.Measuring Proportions
    • 20200215_200123-1-120200214_164549-1-1Houseplant, old x-mas tree. free-style sketches.
      • Tara Mc
        Participant
        Chirps: 14
        how did you get the texture on the leaves of the house plant (beside the horn)? Looks very feathery and I can almost feel it when looking at it.
    • Christine N.
      Participant
      Chirps: 38
      The tools of negative space and proportion (measuring), I believe are going to make my drawings much better.
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      The proportion trick made a difference to my sketches by eye. It helps rough the image in a bit more accurately so that it looked more like the subject. I loved that simply using a pencil and marking along the way is the only tool you need. Proportion is easier to measure when there are distinct parts of the subject.
    • Maggie
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Before this study I thought I was seeing correctly but the measuring technique proved I wasn't!  This was a great exercise that really helped me.  porportion study
    • holly
      Participant
      Chirps: 24
      Using a hand to close around your better eye [or have a small, packable telescope] instead of simply squinting for a your first, immediate view of your field object; or use one piece of paper you stash in the back of your journal with its center cut for you previously with a square or small round you can squint through.
    • LeslieAnne
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      43BD1FF1-8E23-4DFC-9B6E-604A28CDADC8Measuring proportion and using negative space were very helpful in making the drawing more accurate. Because it is still very wet and cold here, I drew from a photograph of a flower I had seen in a Maine forest. Measuring proportion seems to be very useful for drawing parts of plants and animals and for getting their positions more accurate in their settings. I’m still pretty inexperienced in sketching and drawing, so I’m not really sure yet where these techniques would be more or less helpful, but I’m excited to keep practicing and learning.FEB9EAA3-AE06-44BB-8E79-18BE7DCD2E97
    • Jenn
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Using the negative space and measuring is very helpful.  I know this is a good way to help gather information for identifying birds etc. so it was great to see how to apply this to sketching.  Appreciating the surrounding area really helped keep my sketch in proportion.  Thank goodness for erasers!
    • Paul
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      This proportion thing is irritating - BECAUSE IT WORKS - and I'm usually too lazy to do it. But when I do it makes my drawings render more accurately. I did a freeze frame of those Red Foxes from the last lesson's video and tried the "number of heads" method and stuff looked better. It helped me realize the slender length of the parent fox versus the shorter, tighter form of the  youth fox. I'm buying into measuring proportion!  I also used some negative space to capture some of the interaction between the two animals. I like the way the instructor asks me to "be gentle" with myself and also to just go for it. Helpful. I've destroyed a few pages of my book but also have some that I'm proud of! I got this course as a birthday gift and it's one of the best I've ever received!
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Measuring proportion is a real help.  I always try to visually use the head of a bird as the guide, but the additional use of the pencil as the ruler really helps.  Thinking about negative space was very helpful with drawing the feathers.IMG-0187
    • Seth
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      mushroomsLittle Sam Knob The lessons on negative space and proportion helped me a lot in these last two.  I did not find any difference between taking a measurement of the proportions of the mushrooms or the mountains.  In both situations, it helped get more faithful representations of reality.
    • Craig
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      AC05B768-4FFD-4379-8C63-95D2AF9C0629Pretty amazing how easy it is to use this method. Helped me get the proportions right on this planter.
    • Madeleine
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      It took me a good hour and lots of erasing and re-drawing to get the proportions right on this, which I made from my own photo. Even though the photo was a square format, I ended up making the tiger too large and therefore losing my negative space. I did find the measuring useful, though trickier to use with a photo. And I still managed to get the right eye (our left) in too close initially and having to correct it. Same thing with the chin, which was initially too small and needed correcting. So a modicum of perfectionism (not my strongest point) is a good idea here! Interesting observation: I always think of tigers as being orange and black, even though I spent almost 2 weeks photographing them in the wild last year. Now, when I started adding color, I realized how much white they have. tiger
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        Wow, beautiful! I drew a tiger face last year, but it took me 3 hours! Cats have incredible eyes!!!
    • Madeleine
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      seashell drawing This is more challenging than I thought it would be. Using my eraser a lot!
      • Madeleine
        Participant
        Chirps: 13
        The vertical photo doesn't seem to work, sorry
      • Madeleine
        Participant
        Chirps: 13
        seashell drawing Better
    • Constance
      Participant
      Chirps: 26
      IMG_2050The use of proportions really helped in that I tend to get so interested in one aspect of the subject and make that aspect too big!. This forced me to keep that tendency under control. I focused first on relative proportions and then started using negative space, too. It was rewarding that they worked together. I was able to use the proportion techniques on a still plant, but it takes me a long time. It will take a lot of practice before I can do this with a moving subject.
    • sondra
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      5C437A32-2964-4967-9F17-90630282B490
    • Martha Davis
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      IMG_4926 I've been working on proportion with landscapes, too, but I've continued to work with leaves a little. This upside down maple leaf was on the library walkway across the street from me. The iconic maple leaf shape is not so obvious because the points of the leaf are largely curled under.
      • Timothy
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        I really like the way the high contrast shading brings out the veins in this leaf. You wouldn't see them so much from the top.
      • Pat
        Participant
        Chirps: 12
        Nice contrast
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 22
      F3805605-4295-465F-AA0C-F6F8BEE8C155 I think this class is working! I looked at this eggplant and thought how pretty it is, but expected the drawing to be mush. The actual eggplant is prettier and the shadows need something, but I was pleased with how it came out. It turns out that my middle-aged eyes can see either the pencil point or the distant object but not both, so I’ll need to experiment with checking proportions. Negative space helped for getting the leaf shapes right. Gesture drawing frequently also helps: it makes me decide what’s essential.