• Tom
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      I liked the lesson/reminder about “negative space.”  I say reminder because I’ve heard of the concept before and even “studied” it a bit while reading and doing exercises from “Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain” about 35 years ago.  I found the concept very helpful applied to this science journal focus.  Recently I was in California (from Wisconsin) and my granddaughter came rushing in from outside and said excitedly, “I found a bug!,” and I “humored her" and went outside to see...HOLEY MOLEY, she was right!  This beautiful praying mantis was just hanging around on their patio and I took a pic, then let it crawl on my hand (I remembered from somewhere they don’t really “bite”--other than maybe decapitating their mates) and it became my subject when back in (now cold and snowy) Wisconsin.  I drew a frame around it for rendering purposes so I could use the concept of negative space to help me with the complex shape.  That also allowed for the insect to "break out of the frame" which I wasn't planning, but really liked the effect. I like using colored watercolor pencils, and this was the first time that I scribbled a bit of pencil pigment on the page and then dipped my water-filled brush into it.  This allowed me to mix dry color a bit. An interesting experience.  I finished the drawing with a few extra strokes of the pencils directly on the drawing to give a stronger accent of color.mantis
      • Amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 22
        Nice! Welcome to CA! The frame helps me too with negative space.
      • Pat
        Participant
        Chirps: 12
        Thanks for the tip, I have a great many insect photos so I will try your techniques
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        Wow, great drawing! Like it coming out of the box, great layout.
      • Tara Mc
        Participant
        Chirps: 14
        nice work!
    • holly
      Participant
      Chirps: 24
      Was anybody in the class a drafts person B-4 he or she became a interested in field sketching and journalism? I was taught about measuring proportions most simply using a pencil at arm's length or holding my thumb on my paintbrush at arm's length to make measurements and count. Another thing my first teacher suggested re: measure, focus & proportion was use two sheets of printer paper folded into perfect rectangles;  from the folded tip , cut a 1"square from the center of one sheet & from the tip of the other cut a perfect 1"circle. This paper tool worked like the 'squint test ' Fuller asks us to use. Scan3
    • Barbara T.
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      2019-11-11 flower
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      The measuring technique helped me with this indoor plant. Being even more aware of the negative space helped with proportions and determining measurements. IMG_1339
    • William
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      I have always liked small landscapes.  FDSC_9462or this lesson I picked a spot I created in the backyard.  Since I made this spot it attracts a lot of the neighborhood wildlife.  I was able to use the tools taught in the lessons to set up the proportions for this quick sketch.
    • holly
      Participant
      Chirps: 24
      I don't remember Prof.Fuller talking about the use of a hand lens B-4 and I'm curious [as I've not had the chance to look it up yet myself], but I can imagine what such a device might be. I think the 'pik glass' [a handheld tool, almost like what a jeweler uses] my dad gave me would serve the purpose. Holly
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 34
      A comparison study that I tried to keep to the right proportions, I did use a ruler because the piece of plant was in my hand inside by the time I finished.  Using a hand lens helped for some of the tiny details proportion at the tiny scale is a challenge too.   CE26441A-421B-4121-9209-C8DAD88DCAA0
    • Joannie
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      I found that measuring proportions in the field has helped me a lot.  Not so much on moving objects though.  But I now can get a pretty good idea on moving objects since I think about it now.
    • Kati
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      i wasn't able to get outside, but my cat proved to be a great source for getting proportions right. For the most part she sat still long enough to get good measurements. Proportion has been a struggle so I'm glad to have had this practice!
    • Montecito
      Participant
      Chirps: 22
      This measuring technique worked better for me when drawing landscape, not to the smaller subjects. For smaller works better the other technique taught on the video. This measuring techniques are great, they really help to get a good proportion.
    • Sandy
      Participant
      Chirps: 32
      IMG_2608
      • Amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 22
        Verbena?
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      It really did help to have a reference point to start. I'd noticed in my turkey drawings that I didn't have the proportions correct for each area of the bird. They have very small heads leading to a very large intricate body so I will draw them again and get closer to the actual dimensions. What I've drawn is a hibiscus plant while it's blooming. They normally only last 2 days at most so was glad to capture it and will redo in color as we get to that area. Hibiscus-proportion
      • Laurie
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        Susan, the hibiscus is so lovely and accurate that in my mind I am seeing it in color! My mother-in-law loved these plants and for years I had one of them in our bedroom. I see those flowers in your drawing. Cheers, Laurie
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 34
      FD87EDC0-6C64-4CF9-8491-2F64BC415B85 Some samples from our walk today. Working on observing and recording when I don’t have my notebook.  Fall tree nuts are interesting and we found some branches of oaks too.  Brought them home with us to draw and some from memory too.  Using some texture and shading new skills and trying to get the proportions better represented.  I like the challenging exercises.