• Tyler
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      1. I felt like everything I needed was in the photo but that the challenge would be in my translation into the drawing. I felt like my drawing did not capture the proper scale. I made my branch too big so some of the leaves did not make it on the paper. I also had a really hard time drawing the leaves. When it came to the bird, I didn't get the eye correct. My bird was also not fat enough. Overall, I struggled with what I should start drawing first. I thought I should have started drawing the bird first because that is the focal point of the exercise, but I started with the branch first (working left to right). 2. There were a lot of things I would not have noticed had I not been asked to draw it. Perhaps the biggest thing is that I wouldn't have noticed the impact of the focus of the picture. Clearly, the bird is the focal point, but that also manifests itself in the rest of the picture. Some of the leaves are in focus and some are not, etc. I think this does make a difference when journaling. I think this exercise taught me that I should be focusing on the subject first and the background second. When I drew my picture, I started methodically - left to right drawing the picture - because I was trying to make sure I drew the entire picture and not just the bird.   Tg0h74x5nsugvmtcml9jaad90k7jg0alc
    • Kimberly
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      yellow warbler Fun!  I prefer using colors.  Keeping it simple worked for me!
    • Jenny
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I feel more confident drawing from a photo because the subject doesn't move.  I also felt less pressure because I know this is a pre-test of sorts. I wouldn't have noticed all the cool lichens growing on the branch, the small bill of the bird, the way the foot grasps the branch. Differences in nature journaling would be noticing not just a single subject, but all around that subject too
    • Janelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      yellow warbleI think I noticed a lot more detail by drawing it. I also realized that I couldn't quite capture the way the bird was standing on the branch.  The yellow warble that I drew looked awkward. The color of the lichen was also challenging for me.  I feel it would be easier to draw something that was standing still, though, than if it had been moving.  So the photo exercise worked for me!
    • Elizabeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Drawing from the photo I could take my time. Easy for me were the legs and feet on the branch.  Having the negative space between the legs was very helpful.Challenging was getting the shape of the bird, particularly the head and the breast. Noticing the streaks on the breast I might not have noticed if I wasn't drawing.  Yes, I think you see much more detail when nature journaling.
    • Wanda
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      lesson11. Overall, I enjoyed drawing from a photo. However, sometimes I noticed tensing up trying to capture details. The detail of primary and secondary feathers was particularly challenging. I also struggled with the position of the warbler; as it turned out, I drew it more upright than it was in photo. 2. I think I would not have noticed shadows; the more I looked, the more I noticed shadows and they were fun and easy to draw and they make a big difference in making the bird look more alive.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      It felt a little sterile drawing from a photo that I did not take or experience first hand. The photo was a size that I could draw to size in my sketch book, so it was easy to take measurements. I didn't like the pencil I was working with and all the smudging I created, but I decided to not worry about it. If I weren't asked to draw it, I may not have noticed the different lichens and the texture of the leaves. It's those kinds of details I like to notice when in the field.   day one draw from photo yellow bird  
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      It felt easier after watching the evolution of other people's journals in the video.  I put up such a high bar for myself that I don't even want to start drawing but this made it more approachable.  I was surprised the bird I drew actually looked like a bird! I wouldn't have noticed how black the eye was along with the wing bars and even the branch his foot was on.  Black seems blacker.  In a photo I don't see the contrast.
    • Ashley
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I notice many more details when drawing compared to simply taking a photo.  The difficulty lies in controlling my pencil.  The good thing is this bird will not move and I can take my time.
    • Tom
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I felt self conscious working, a little too aware of myself trying to draw! The whole effort was pretty challenging, the self critic hanging around most of the time. All pretty challenging; maybe it was easy to "stay with it, the project." I was drawn to the texture of the tree limbs. The invitation of nature journalling: look at the details. yRUTPohlTAKxHgchelLqUQ
    • Carmen
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      PXL_20201231_015746533.MP1. I like drawing from a photo because I have time to pay attention to the details. I can redo something if I feel it doesn't quite lol like the photo I have plenty of time to make mistakes and to try to improve the picture. It was easy  but I don't give much detail not adding colors. 2. When I drew the bird i did notice the different kind of textures of the feathers that i might not have noticed, I also noticed the lichens on the branch and the ring around the bird's eye. I think when nature journaling I will be able to pay attention to details that otherwise I would overlook. Just looking at a picture of a bird I get the general idea but don't pay attention to those details as much.
      • Jessica
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        I love how you captured the feathers on its back- I struggled with those!
    • linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      image
    • Pam
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      birdsketch1
    • Judy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      The first drawing I have attempted since school (and I am now retired). I chose not to do the surrounding branches which I now think would have framed the picture better. I liked drawing from the picture as I could zoom in a bit. The claws were fascinating and I wouldn’t have noticed them without studying the photo. I struggled to replicate the beak and to show the tilt of the head. 3381C9BC-6CA1-47C7-B29D-170EEEF3CD1F
    • Janine
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      I had some trouble with proportions and with soft, fluffy areas   Exercise 1
    • Evangelyn
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      BC276698-30DF-4F38-A9EE-2B50A5811CFA I liked drawing from the photo because I had all the time in the world.  I could focus in and out.  My first attempt was with pencil.  I did another with watercolor. I like painting better.  It is easier to deal with the textures - I think.  It also forces journaling because you are waiting for the paint to dry.  I liked having to really think about the shape and perspective.  It was challenging to capture the fine detail - black edges of feathers, the twig.  There was so much in this simple picture so I can imagine focus on just one thing instead of trying to detail everything - or an impression of everything with focus on one.  There was so much I noticed because I was trying to draw.  The shape of the breast and belly.  The color variation around the eye.  The lichen and spots on the leaves.
    • Miriam
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      IMG-2646 I enjoyed this exercise because I would love to see my progress by the end of this class. Drawing from a photo is easier than drawing from life, because there is no movement, and you can copy exactly without worrying about any changes during the drawing process. If I had not been asked to draw this, I wouldn't have noticed how the bird's claws wrapped around the branch. This would definitely make a difference in nature journaling because observation is extremely important.
    • worker33
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      yellow warbler wk It was a good first exercise, drawing from a photograph was much simpler than a live study, since no creature would give me that much time. The detail I wouldn't have noticed was how the feet clutched the branch, an it was until the end that I realized that there was a bit of a tilt in the warbler's head that I tried to add after drawing the head and really struggling with the beak!
    • Derrick
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
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    • Lisa K
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Details.  Paying close attention to the shapes- head shape, where the eye sits.  I had trouble making (him?) look like his head is cocked like the photo.  And patience- drawing the lines and exact colors.  The feet were so interesting to draw, and difficult.  Drawing from the photo also helped force me to look at the negative space more.  Excited for the next lesson where Liz shows us her tricks. IMG_6414
    • Sue
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Drawing from a photo means I can take time to practice observing and capturing the shape and color. On the other hand, with all the details on the photo, it is challenging when trying to prioritize what to focus on and what to leave out.   Yellow Warbler 1
    • mike
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
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    • sharon
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Sketching a bird is much more detailed than taking a photo.  The detail is very difficult and there is a point tool let go ... 68CFEB8C-58AD-44A5-BC15-2003B1FC0320
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      D26F8C97-E026-4A84-BB65-C78EF9DB854FI was happier with my sketch until I added the watercolours. I am still learning how they work. Having the photo definitely lets you see the subtle colours in the bird and in the branch. Replicating them is a whole other thing for me.
    • Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      IMG_3806