• Brandii
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I love drawing from photos because you have time to really study every aspect - the light brown in the feathers, the pattern of black in the wings...Drawing from nature wont allow the luxury of unhurried studySketch 1
      • Joan
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        I love how you got the little nod of its head.  Not sure what you did to do so?  Bill profile definitely, but still, I can't see what you did beyond that (and bill profile is subtle!)  Also love the shading you did on the head and back.  Branch detail is great too!  Joan
    • MARY JANE
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I have no idea how to insert a photo of my bird AND insert my reply to the questions.  Sorry for, perhaps, creating a little mess.  If any one can give me a few clues how to streamline inserting photo and replying I'd appreciate it.   How'd I feel about drawing from photo?  It was fine with me.  I had very little time to devote to the drawing so I just dived in and did it without recommended pencil or drawing pad.  Quick sketch wasn't too hard.  If I had tried for accuracy/details etc I may have become discouraged AND color would have been a nightmare!  I drew so fast that I didn't have time to notice details other than color of beak, feet, and reddish lines on chest.  All things I would have "seen" as a long time birder.  I was happy that I just jumped in and sketched quickly because FEAR always 1st Drawing Quick Dec 4 2020holds me back from drawing.  Drawing YES would help me see more!
    • Florence
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      Sorry about that. I goofed when sending. This was challenging. Birds are difficult to draw so they look correct and not cartoon like.  I draw from photos most of the time to keep as a record and go back to it later.  Probably several things I missed in the photo.  I tend to only see the basics and going back several times I notice more.
    • Florence
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      0781663A-EFF6-4A32-9F28-F0E75B0CF5CD
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      DFAB6200-46A5-45E2-8313-4E07913563C8 I found it some what daunting to draw the image . I wasn’t sure my drawing would actually take the proper shape  I also had trouble with perspective I noticed more of the details on the birds feathers and also the coloring  it isn’t just a ‘yellow bird’ it has other coloring and markings yes I would be more observant than when I would have been taking a photo
    • Adrienne
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      8D497766-BCF9-43F4-9B5D-FD7753CE3B41I found the process to challenging but enjoyable. A couple of months ago I would have found it to be a bit more challenging, but I have been practicing drawing birds here and there using a great nature journaling resource by John Muir Laws. It’s been both relaxing and rejuvenating to spend some time practicing while my young girls are resting. The sketching portion is definitely easier for me, although I find getting proper proportions and small details to be a challenge. Painting is even more of a challenge for me, but I am loving it! Sketching and painting definitely allow me to pay better attention to the subject and feel more intimate with it than I would by simply studying the photo. I love putting than finishing dot on the eye and feeling as though the bird has come to life in front of me.
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      5AE89C2B-C71F-432F-87B5-A59A6B7B47AA_1_105_cintimidating but helpful to look at how others approach the challenge!
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      MORITA WARBLER I found the exercise challenging as I haven't drawn in years and I did not excel in drawing years ago.  While trying to draw the bird, I noticed how fluffy the birds feathers were and how cute he was.  I normally don't have a chance to really look over a bird I see in real life.  I found it hard to draw the tree branch he is perched on and make it look realistic.  I have a tendency to want to draw either straight lines or smooth curves.
    • Tracy
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I was intimidated to start, but it got easier once I began. Drawing the warbler came more easily than the branch and leaves. I have to fight my perfectionism, and often it feels better if I just approach it a bit more intuitively. If I hadn't have drawn it, I don't think I'd have noticed so much contrast in the leaves and branches. 20201202_220049
    • Sherrie
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      It's been a couple of years since my last art class. Looking forward to using my water colors again.20201201_122830
    • Clare
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      I felt a little nervous about drawing from the photo, jumping right in as it were.  The most challenging part was just putting pencil to paper.  Once I got the pencil moving, making short strokes that formed shapes, I could feel things relaxing a bit.  The more I relaxed and looked at the photo, the more I was able to notice little details.  There were little holes in the leaves from bugs.  The warbler's feathers were tufted and soft looking near its legs, whereas the feathers on its back were sharp, layered precisely on top of one another.  When I first looked at the photo, all I saw was yellow, but as I drew and looked more, I noticed little fine colorations such as the brown streaks on its breast, black layers in its folded up wings. I also was able to notice how large its eye was compared to the size of its head!  Drawing the details makes such a huge difference because it can help with identifying whatever it is you are drawing.yellow warbler
    • Martha
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
        The bird was easy to draw. The challenging was to draw the logs, because of the shape, textura and that different kinds of lichen.
        I didn’t drawn the logs and leaves
        I consider write some characteristics of the bird, log and lichen
    • Martha
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      0727D312-C79D-419B-A7AE-8FFA73D19E27
    • Maggie
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      1. I have to admit that I was nervous to draw without any instruction as I do not know how to draw. So the entire exercise proved to be a challenge, including overcoming the challenge to just dive in and try to capture the bird's form and expression. I had difficulties capturing its shape and hope to learn how to do this as we make our way through the course but I kept at it. I really want to try and sketch what I felt looked like a smile or smirk on its face. Yes, I'm likely anthropomorphizing but I felt like there was a real liveliness to the bird. I felt more comfortable trying to sketch the branches and leaves but wanted to fully capture those details like the lichen and bends of the branches. The subtleties of the whole photo--from the way the warbler's feet curled around the branches to the vibrant green pouf of lichen--commanded my attention. Now if only my I could gain the artistic skill to render all of it on the page. 2. I likely would have overlooked the way the warbler's feet grasped the branch and the intricacies of its claws. Another detail was the branch itself -- I was really "drawn" (excuse the pun) to its shape and various textures. YWarblerFirstExercise
    • Patti
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      Photos capture the scene in a millisecond! Birds don’t stand still typically, so I can snap off dozens of shots while they flit through the bushes or trees, or hop on the ground. My focus while photographing is on the lighting, focus, and peering through the aperture to frame the subject. While photographing I’m not focused on the feel of the air, or gregarious sounds of the birds, or smell of the woods. And I’m in constant motion. When sketching my ears and nose as well as eyes are activated. I am taking note of scale and position of the bird; its stance, its shape, and noticing detail such as the alignment of the eye to the beak. Could this have an effect on how the bird is able to feed? Yes, sketching opens my mind to ask other questions beyond creating a photo that captures light, color and composition. 83B5F4D9-1B1F-44E4-89F3-4E46746F8AFB
    • Erin
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      nature journaling pre-assessment E Foxmann
    • BARBARA
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Bird acad warbler Nov272020
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I have usually sketched from photos, so I have a little more comfort there with a still image, and a pencil. The beak was a surprising little challenge - as it was initially wider than the little pincer-like warbler feature I was first going for. I think the thing I really enjoy about journaling over photographs is the labeling of other things - like the lichens, and the tree species (even if unknown). Adding features like time/date/weather, maybe the trail etc. I am most nervous about the real-life drawing in situ - the figure/motion drawings is something I've never done.warb1
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      I liked drawing from the photo as it gave me lots of time without movement of the bird.  I felt happy tackling this subject.  Appreciating the little feet wrapped around the branch. Getting the proportions of the body-head-wings was challenging but taking the idea that the bird structure is geometric -various forms of circles and ovals helped. In particular it was challenging  was achieving that slight gesture of the head to the right and the relation of beak to the eye and the eye was the hardest to enliven.
      • What drawing helped me notice was the way the wing is buried in the shape of the body.  And the neat little toes on the branch.imageimage
    • Margaret
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      I felt fine about drawing from the photo. It took a long time to get the dimensions of the bird right and I don't have it right yet but I stopped after making 2 copies of it. I noticed the wing structure more and where the wing starts and ends at. I noticed how far back the legs are situated on the warbler. I noticed the placement of the eye in relation to the bill. I tried to notice the relationships in the anatomy of the bird. I find the feathers in the wing difficult and want to simplify it. In a photo I think it's harder to simplify than if I had been copying a  drawing. Would it make a difference when nature journaling? Well, good question. That's why I'm taking the course. I want to be more exact in the drawings I make of birds. Wings and feather structures have defeated me and I simplify as much as possible. It doesn't make a difference to my nature journaling in so far as I'm usually trying to tell a story, something that happened and is of interest to me, some behaviour or event I want to capture. Still, I would like to have a better idea of how to draw the bird more accurately. IMG_1192IMG_1193
    • Suzanne
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      20201123-IMG_7255
    • Audrey
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      20201120_223701_Burst01I love drawing from photos because you can take as long as you want! I had a little trouble getting the body shape right at first, but once I got it filling in the details was fairly easy. I don't think I would have noticed that some of the leaves have bug bites in them if I had not taken the time to draw it.
    • Blanca
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      Photos are quicker to take although if you want a nice high res photo, it takes time. Drawings - details! Nov 19/20 - My first yellow warbler drawing. Yellow Warbler #1 - course
    • Carol
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      It is easier to draw than a real bird because it doesn't move. If I am going to paint or draw something, I often snap a picture with my I phone. I don't think I would have noticed the moss or fungi if drawing in the moment for the journal WIN_20201119_14_50_42_Pro
    • David
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      DSCN4249
      • David
        Participant
        Chirps: 8
        I thought that I had submitted this earlier, but could not find it. I did not mean to submit it twice though.  How do I delete one?
      • David
        Participant
        Chirps: 8

        @David I changed journals after this drawing as I did not totally like the course paper I had in this journal.