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    • Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      Bird_Academy
      1. Have you tried a comparison study? Tell us about it, and upload an image of your journal page if you choose to. What did you learn from this very focused journaling experience? 2. How do you think you might balance drawing, writing, and recording numerical data in your journal?
      You must be enrolled in the course to reply to this topic.
    • Blanca
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      BlancaManzanilla
      Comparing two snakes that crossed my path today. comparing snakes
    • Tiffany
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      ainwena
      imageI decided to compare two yard plants that I thought would share some similar characteristics.  Turns out that they don’t!  When comparing them, I wasn’t really excited about it.  But in my observations I did notice that the bunnies use the fountain grass as a place to hide out and hang out, so that made it a bit more interesting.
    • Becky
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      rfranks420
      I'm having so much fun with this - and I see so many ways to use comparison studies.  I began with a comparison of two oak leaves.  Honestly, I'd never really thought much about the fact that there are so many different kinds of oak trees.  To start, I randomly picked two different leaves and used them for my first comparison study.  This made me curious to know more about the trees in my area - and I've been learning more about them each day. Oak leaves
    • John
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Wildvoices
      I choose late-season wild Snowberry and Rose fruits for my comparison. What I really enjoyed about this exercise is how it made me look for detail and to appreciate the beauty that can be found in natural objects as they start to disintegrate at the end of the season. I especially liked the shape of the curved rose thorns when you look very closely. While snowberries appear white from a distance, when I held them against a the snow, they are actually a light, creamy white. For fun, I tried out the watercolours to add another dimension to the page. It is very hard to make something look white (or creamy white) on a white journal page! John 2020_11_13
    • kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      kattykort
      NJC Comparison This fall we have had a flock of Clarks Nutcrackers and several Stellar Blue Jays co-habitating in our canyon. At one point we had over 50 Nutcrackers, but the majority of them moved on and about a dozen have stayed and the Jays are staying too. In the four years that we have been here (Salmon Idaho) we have not had Nutcrackers in our canyon so this is very interesting. There are differences and similarities between the two species. Physically they are similar in size.  Socially the Jay is much more aggressive, but the Nutcrackers are very verbal if you invade their space. The Jays seem to be solitary where the Nutcrackers are in a large group, but are paired up. They are both feeding on the Douglas Fir pine cones but the Jays are always looking for a handout at the feeders. A very interesting note; this past spring we planted fifty White Pine seedlings, along with Ponderosa, Lodgepole and Western Cedars. We did this to bring diversity to our DF woodlots but also to attract Nutcrackers (their main source of food is WP seeds).  The seedlings are not producing seeds yet and will not for quite some time, but whenever I tend to the WP seedlings the NC's put up quite a ruckus. Is it possible they were drawn to the canyon by the presence of the seedlings?
    • Candy
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Candy.schrank
      20201111_201306
      • kathleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        kattykort
        There are Ninebark bushes all over our property, they are native to the area. I wonder if I can collect the seeds and start them myself? I love the button bush but I don't believe they are native here. Thanks for the comparison I will look around to see if we have any Button bushes around here.
    • Pat
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Pat.Martin
      IMG_2157(1)  My leaves were not similar but I found the differences interesting.  I enjoyed just really taking tie to look at objects.
    • Heather
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      hollidog
      A753A256-228A-4804-A59A-8769D3B56B20I notices different sizes of the shrubs. The configuration of the branches, the relative lightness of the potintella versus the nine bark. It’s the the first perennial garden we created and it will be fun to see how it survives.
    • amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      amykarst
      MockObeautyBI chose two bushes that grow in my yard. I was interested in them because it is now late October and  they are very different. The Mock Orange shows no sign of fall, really. Still green and strong with dark berries. The Burning Bush has turned a gorgeous magenta/red color and has begun to shed its leaves and has bright pink/orange berries. I enjoyed forcing myself to look closer and notice the similarities and differences beyond their obvious colors.
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      LindaWorden
      Comparison drawing I liked this exercise.  It really helped me concentrate on the details.  Amazing how things look so similar from a distance and then when looking closely how different they really are.
    • Cindy
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      cduffy
      This spring I planted Salvia Victoria Blue and Salvia Red Hot Sally. Although both are salvia the do not look much alike. I did my comparison between the two and found even more differences than I noticed through casual observation. I'm still unsure how they can both be called Salvia other than that they both seem to be in the mint family.IMG_7308 I don't have a system yet for recording drawing, writing and numerical data so they are organized for comparison.
    • Liliana
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Liliana Ponce
      image
      • amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        amykarst
        I love your feathers! They look so real!
      • Alisha
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        alishabirdie
        Beautiful feathers, what a great idea!  I have some from the same bird, and will give it a go!
    • Marta
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      MartaOli
      The power of comparison_Marta_5.10.2020 I choose two "mates", that stand in the park for as long I remember. They are: a Gingko biloba tree and a Hibiscus bush, with light pink flowers. But... I wasn't sure about the name of the flowers (!). Then I checked: hibiscus. It's autumn and the flowers are blossoming, in a beautiful pink and green composition; I could see fully blossomed flowers and about-to-blossom ones. I had never looked at these flowers with such a detail. I was marveled by the delicate petals and the five dark pink dots, every flower has. I am curious to search for more scientific information, about hibiscus. I had searched for Gingko biloba, in the past. Yet, comparing it's leafs with the hibiscus petals was an interesting exercise. Also, it allowed me to look closer at the colors of the leafs, texture and how smooth they are. Balancing drawing and writing is something I'm still learning; I don't think I have found my style yet, although I usually prefer to draw in one page and write on the adjacent one, if possible. In this exercise, I draw and wrote notes on the same page. I haven't used colors yet, as I's like to know more, before I use them.
    • Deb
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      AZGal01
      I focused on two plants in my back yard...but in drawing them and making my observations, I was taken back on a journey to my high school biology class. I needed to research, and then added to my comparison study, the reproductive parts of a plant.  It was a wonderful journey.   IMG_4938
    • May
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      May-A-A
      I learned to look closer. I've always had those flowers around but never noticed the inner of the flower nor how the color blends smoothly. I would always try to draw, write and notice numerical data because it clarifies so much about the flower. Comparison-Study
    • Beverly
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      BeverlyEvans
      I liked doing the comparison study.   It made me really look at each flower and each leaf.  I am searching for my style and decided to try the boxes and I like them.  Scan_0002
    • Kim
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      kimmie06
      58C3D575-8479-44D0-B1D9-856DCC05AE23Making comparisons allowed me to hone in on observations I may have overlooked.
    • Sandra
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      sjessop
      First, it's October and still in the 100's, so my garden is hot and tired, much like I am.  I found two flowers to compare and my dogs encouraged me to clip them and finish the work inside.  I didn't have a plan, but words formed around my image in a cluster, much the same as the flowers grew.  It was fun to look closely and see the similarities and differences.  Shape and color stood out the most.  Most plants good for Arizona have tiny leaves, so I'm guessing this vine has grown so well because it has shade. 7kc9qs78RfWC6o8Ux3si2w_thumb_773eUNADJUSTEDNONRAW_thumb_773d
      • Deb
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        AZGal01
        Sandra - I love your note about your garden, the temps and you! Like you, I found my flowers, took photos and came inside; despite a cooler day at 88. I live in Arizona as well - and like you - I am ready for cooler temps. I love the Bird of Paradise Bush and your observations.  ;-)
    • Adrienne
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Adrienne291
      Comparison Study I chose 2 flowers to compare. It's fall now, but I was surprised to find there were flowers out still. I did enjoy doing a comparison study, because I think I noticed details that I wouldn't have otherwise, and it allowed me to think about the purpose of flowers. That is, to attract pollinators so the plants can produce seeds. The first frost is probably coming soon, so these late bloomers will need to make seeds soon if they want to have offspring next spring. I don't know too much about plants, so perhaps there is a strategy here that I'm not aware of. Anyway, I would have liked to do a comparison study with some kind of animals, but unfortunately they move too much and I think I wouldn't notice a whole lot unless I spent hours observing. I think this exercise will equip me for the next observations going forward. They certainly reminded me how to think like a scientist!
    • Jean
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      jigoe2
      Enjoyed doing this. The exercise of posing questions from what you are looking at was good and will be really helpful away from home.IMG_5755 Even sitting in my backyard, comparing herbs that I use in cooking was enlightening.
    • Janice
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      JaniceMcDll
      48920916-C043-4EBC-AD06-BF6E98FD3294
    • Caroline
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      benjaminboies
      IMG_7910 1. I went outside and picked 2 branches with different leaves from my backyard. It was cold and my son wanted to stay inside, so the compromise was that we would stay in, but that I would draw while he played. I learned going back and forth between my 2 examples. Whenever I noticed a detail on one, I would check for a similar element on the other, and so on. I ended up observing much more than what I anticipated. I also picked a maple branch with leaves that were pretty much dead. I was surprised by my own choice... and how much beauty I found in something that was past its prime.  2 - I realize that drawing first and writing around the drawing flows better for me. I might just keep a page for writing and another for my drawings and light notes.
    • Richard
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      rflora5709
      Just spending time in my backyard, comparing flowering annuals. Trying to get better at drawing what I see.comparison drawing 4B
    • Ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      asimmons
      I have done three comparisons - in my garden, two flowering plants which are difficult for me to identify until they flower - scarlet lynchnis and four o'clocks; kayaking up Little River in Washington County, Maine, two finely divided leafy submersed plants which I later identified as water marigold and large purple bladderwort; and walking through Moosehorn Wildlife Refuge in Washington County, Maine, two ferns, interrupted fern and Christmas fern.  The exercise has been very helpful for me in looking closely at the parts of plants and learning the proper vocabulary for describing them as well as thinking about form and function.
    • Paula
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      EatingOnTwoWheels
      Observation! Becoming better at observing was one of the main reasons I wanted to take this course. I find identifying plants in nature so difficult - I hope this will help. To that end, I compared twig cuttings of two different species of mesquite in my yard.  And I absolutely noticed so much more than I would have, using the comparison method! My written comparisons are on another page, and I have already added more questions and possible answers as they pop into my head. I hope when I start using a different notebook, my pages will become more pleasing to the eye, overall. I am trying to cram too much on one page, I think. It was a lot of effort, drawing all those leaflets!  By the time I was done with the overall sketch of each, I was nearly out of steam to do proper secondary drawings.   Mesquite Comparison Study Drawings
    • Bridget
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      rimuridge
      1. It's not quite spring here so I couldn't find anything in flower. Mine is a small shrub comparison. This exercise made me really curious about why there is so much difference in the leaf type of two plants in the same environment. 2. I like the mix of multiple drawings, notes and measures. I appreciate the idea of having the full subject rough sketch to go alongside the more focused sketches. Adding the questions, not just the observations and data is really powerful to me. IMG_20200906_081838
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      LinElin
      unnamed (4)Enjoyed this exercise, found I noticed more details about each plant.
    • Martha
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Mswearin
      D1440C23-E176-4075-960D-18700A9D8CF4Really an intimate way to intersect art and discovery. This slow introspection allowed me to see the wonder and beauty of something I was quite fearful of prior to the study. As Hurricane Laura was not far from my area, I ventured inside and retrieved a matchbox with specimens from my yard. Originally meant for my grandchildren, I found myself the student! I have a greater appreciation for this noisy summer cicada.
    • Lumi
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      lumifox
      1.I tried a Venn diagram with the butterfly bush and hydrangea, and saw many similarities and differences, like how butterfly bush has a bit of red on it. 2. I did a lot of small drawings to give a visual, then lots of observations. image
    • Fabiola
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      fabiola22
      ADEE018B-F0FE-430E-91B0-8558C57809B4_1_201_a
      • Caroline
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        benjaminboies
        this is really lovely! It's like you adapted your handwriting to the shape of each tree. Even more awesome if you didn't do it on purpose :)
    • dgolson
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      dgolson
      I compared butterfly bush and black-eyed susan in my garden. Either my sketchbook is too small or I tried to cram too much information in--I suspect this would be a problem with a larger notebook because there is so much to compare. I may try and think more ahead of time about whether I making a general comparison to identify something or if there is something I specifically want to compare. I didn't leave enough room to write down questions. dgolson observation exercise 081320
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Jennyfee1970
      IMG_20200808_143546 I compared two plants in my garden that I see every day but was looking at their details for the first time.
      • Connor
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        Connor Bowhay
        Those are awesome drawings, what a creative way of organizing you page
    • Kim
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      KimMeyer
      IMG_20200730_175205 I compared two flowering plants in Parc Micaud, Besançon (FR). This comparative exercise is so useful for probing into questions of form. I would have liked to have a magnifying glass at hand to learn more; it was quite difficult to see some of the finer details with the naked eye but I had the feeling there was much more to learn!
    • Victoria
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      mvrestre
      I did with two garden plants, I think that when you compare , you pay much attention to details. IMG_2780
    • Beth
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      BDaleoArt
      imageI selected a familiar wild flower and then one I was not familiar with.  I was a little overwhelmed by the second one   (Right side) . I think the Queen Anne’s lace was closer, easier to see and observe. The second one was more complicated but did make me think of a lot of questions about the flower portion, and leaves.  Great exercise!
      • dgolson
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        dgolson
        Good idea to select a flower you are familiar with and one you are not. I didn't think of that.
    • Denise
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      dennymeyer
      red berry shrubyellow flower shrub Such fun. I found tiny flowers where I thought there were only berries and flowers that seemed to grow from the base of leaves. The leaves were so different. Hard shiny plastic for the red berry and  rough as a fine sandpaper for the second, although they looked so soft. Both weeds I suspect, next to a road. I could not find anything similar when I searched for names.
    • Adella
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      adellamarie
      I compared two Florida flowering shrubs: the Firebush and the Golden Dewdrop.  The Firebush has orange tubular flowers growing in clusters with medium sized continuous leaves.  After the flowers bloom, they form dark red berries at the base of the flower.  The Golden Dewdrop has tiny purple flowers growing downward in clusters.  I noticed before the flowers bloom a tiny stem forms, then buds and then the tiny purple flowers bloom.  It reminds me of a dewdrop and hence the name. Both bushes have similar leaves but they are not exactly the same. One is more elongated than the other.  I learned that both flowers attract insects including butterflies. I believe the Firebush also attracts hummingbirds because of the flower's tubular shape.   I learned that every flower has its unique qualities, but can attract similar insects.  I can balance my drawings by using different sized plants, trees. colors.  I discovered so many details on the bushes that I wouldn't have normally noticed until I  started to sketch them.
    • Adella
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      adellamarie
      2020-07-20 - Power of Comparison
    • Amie
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      windflower3
      I wouldn't have noticed how the plains coreopsis' younger shoots of leaves only have 2 segments where the fully mature and ones towards the base of the plant have 5 segments, with the 2 lower ones being forked. Also the black eyed Susan has the slightest blush of deeper yellow at the base of the petals (which I found even more noticeable when doing the squint test).20200716_090133
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      patofvta
      20200714_110647 (1) I have tried the comparison study,  I compared two trees in a barranca park, I started with the bark, tree, structure, color, leaves, and needles.  I had about 30 minutes to complete the assignment.  I did experience a bit of trouble with my spacing in my sketch book.  Also need to sketch darker and with a better plan, will need more practice. I wondered why these trees were planted in this park.  I noticed that there were a wide variety of very tall trees and many species of birds.  I think that bird diversity for habitat played a key role with the many choices of trees planted.  And the needles seem to draw small bug eating birds to the ground under the conifer pine trees.
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      lindaloubird
      Doing a comparison study was a great learning experience.  I did a study between a flight feather and a down feather - which with further study I realized was actually a semi-plume feather.  The flight feather is a wing rather than a tail feather, I think.  It has bands of faded light and dark browns.  So, since it is faded, I believe it is an old, molted feather.  It is 9 1/2 "  and looks to be the feather of a red-tailed hawk.  The semi-plume feather is quite beautiful with a striking spotted pattern.  I plan to redraw it once my drawing skills improve! Also, I need to figure out how to identify this feather.  The spots are probably a good clue.DSCN1092
      • Paula
        Participant
        Chirps: 19
        EatingOnTwoWheels
        I LOVE that you compared feathers!
    • Jill
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      JFeldkamp
      I did a comparison study on two volunteer trees in my backyard. What I learned is that despite thinking that I pay attention to nature, I don't. I missed so many details. This exercise caused me to look so much more closely. I didn't know what one of the trees was. My tree key was of no help, which was extremely frustrating. My son-in-law identified it with his tree key as a White Mulberry. It turns out the White Mulberry was not in my key, only the Red Mulberry and only with mature leaves. Apparently the leaves change shape as the tree ages. Why? The other tree we confirmed was a White Poplar. I had never even noticed the unusual diamond pattern of its bark! The trees came to my yard via their underground system of root suckers from a tree in a neighbor's yard. This study led me down a path to find more information online, which lead me back to look at the trees, which led me back to more study and drawing, and on and on. Comparison Study
      • Paula
        Participant
        Chirps: 19
        EatingOnTwoWheels
        I remember becoming frustrated trying to identify a type of mulberry. Who knew the same tree could have so many different shaped leaves????
    • اليازية
      Participant
      Chirps: 27
      Alyazia
      I’ve compared between the sand bubbler crabs and the black stone crabs. The sand bubblers crabs: light colour that resumable the sand, with redish tips. Have popping long eyes. And live under the sand (I’ve never noticed them eating! They are hard workers while the tide is low!) The black stone crabs: black with a hint of dark green colour. Have half round shapes eyes fixed to their body. And live between the rocks and walls by the shore. (Yes, I saw one eating from a green floating weed that got placed by the rocks due to the low tide - they can be spotted even at the high tide time between the rocks and walls) I need to sketch that in details :)
    • Pauline
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      PaulineDavis
      For years I have not been able to reliably tell the difference between two species of blue camas that grow in the Victoria area, common camas and great camas. Both species have blue flowers with six petals and bothDSCN2909 plants vary in size and colour. So, I decided this would be a good time to really look at both flowers to find some subtle differences.
    • Les
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      Lesbrandt
      This comparison of two plants brings more attention to detail and how the same part of two different plants can be so vastly different. The question of pollinators, who does it ... probably hummingbirds or specialized moths on the columbine but what about the tiny blossoms on the unidentified flower. Using words, numbers and drawings intensifies concentration.     IMG_0670
      • Suzanne
        Participant
        Chirps: 22
        Suzy64
        Love the details and colors. Both plants are delicate, but so different.
    • Terry
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      livingsystems
      I tried another comparison that looked at different stages of development of an Amaryllis over time. I used to study Goethean Science which uses drawing to understand the dynamic form of natural organisms, so it was fun to draw on those old skills.IMG_0471
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      archr1
      A nice exercise. Really increases capacity for detailed observation. 7B8C08C4-E427-41E8-8CBB-9CA1C6475C2D
    • Terry
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      livingsystems
      I really like the comparison lesson. It's amazing how toggling back and forth between two leaves reveals things you wouldn't notice were you drawing them individually. I'm still overworking the medium to try and get the colors and values correct, but hope I'll improve over time. coleus and potatoe vine
      • Suzanne
        Participant
        Chirps: 22
        Suzy64
        Your choice of leaves is a nice departure from the more dramatic flowers, yet they are so pretty and offer a wonderful comparison. City life offers possibilities, too. Bravo.
    • adriana
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      adrisnchz
      Living in NYC I don't feel comfortable taking a bus/train to get to the nearest park so I've been googling images for references. I couldn't get as much detailed as I wanted but I enjoyed the process. I can't wait to be able to do this in the real world. Screen Shot 2020-05-25 at 3.42.45 PM
    • ann
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      abirdkidd
      I am enjoying this course and finding that sitting, listening and observing the small things in detail amid the larger surroundings quite absorbing and calming.  Sketching does make one take the time to really observe and think further. This has been a wonderful way to observe the arrival of spring and see connections in nature that I have not noticed before. I am so impressed by everyones submissions!  I hope to add color to my attempts before long.  imageThe black flies and ticks are currently limiting my time sitting outside (and the yard work that needs attention)
      • Suzanne
        Participant
        Chirps: 22
        Suzy64
        I love this black and white drawing and the detail, too. I have both in my yard. I am tempted to try these, as well, or perhaps couple the bleeding heart with an azalea nearby.
    • Ruth
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      ruthdrawsgonzalez
      Columbine and coreopsis comparison nature journal ruth gonzalez These were definitely two very different flowers. The columbine flower fell apart before I could finish drawing it, but it had very unusual petals (see top of picture for the real petals). Drawing these flowers has made me want to restudy the parts of a plant because each of the recent flowers I have drawn in this journal had me looking up flower parts and I still feel a little unclear about what was what. I would have called the sepals on the columbine petals...I found myself pondering the pollinators who would prefer these two plants - one with a very flat landing pad and one where you would need to approach the flower from underneath. Because the flower fell apart I was better able to discern its separate parts. If you had enough flowers to do this, I can see the advantage of taking a flower apart to better understand its components. I like to have plenty of room for the image so I sometimes have additional notes on another page.
      • Leonora
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        noniebird
        Wow, your colors are so rich and full of life! That Columbine is a beauty . . .  unique in elegance and mystery. I never realized how fascinating Columbine is; you have really captured the loveliness of that flower. I also know what you mean about sepals and tepals and petals - so much to learn.  Your pages look so effortless, but yet detailed. It seems like you are having fun! Thanks for sharing.
      • Suzanne
        Participant
        Chirps: 22
        Suzy64
        These drawings are gorgeous and so detailed. They leap off the page, and it is so artistically arranged. Inspiring.
    • Leonora
      Participant
      Chirps: 29
      noniebird
      12F399E3-E745-40E7-B0AA-0710B44D0A8E
      • Colleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 43
        CBMac7
        Your drawings & writing information continues to just leap off the page and grab my attention. Thanks for sharing.
      • Ruth
        Participant
        Chirps: 18
        ruthdrawsgonzalez
        I agree with Colleen. I love the drawings themselves...they are just gorgeous. The way you have put the page together is so well done - the drawings, the information, the writing, the titles, and the placement of all of the elements holds the page together beautifully and makes me want to learn all about it.
      • Suzanne
        Participant
        Chirps: 22
        Suzy64
        Your drawings are stunning, as though ready for a magazine. The detail and color inspires me to try this, too. I often color in Johanna Basford books. This is far more beautiful; its real.
    • Kathy
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Great Kills Park
      2nd nature sketch 2020 flower comparison
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Gags will
      Enjoyed this exercise!  It helps watching the video and seeing how everyone else is doing it.  It helps get past the, “oh no, it’s a blank page” in front of me!image1 (1)
    • Colleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 43
      CBMac7
      2F51C798-599F-4652-8EB1-A3DC5DE0FF6E 1: Yes, I tried a comparison study & learned that I really need to do more of them. It brings out the child-like wonder, awe, & curiosity of learning & exploration that I miss. I did my study on 3 different types of Irises in my front yard & gardens. I noticed that Irises have lots of differences in color, shape, size, quantity, function, & systems. They also share similarities. The “why” questions of color, shape, size, quantity, function & systems all expanded into further study ideas & more questions to ask. 2: To balance my journal pages, I need to add more writing details & get use to adding numerical data to the drawings. I have been focused on the drawings & making them detailed & life-like, and by leaving off the information of who, what, where, when, why, & how that tells the whole story, was the important missing pieces to complete the pages. Everything is equally important.
      • Leonora
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        noniebird
        Hi, Colleen. Your irises are beautiful. You’ve captured the small details and rich colors of each flower. I really like the way you organized your information. It makes your page easy to read and understand. I wish I had irises in my yard!
      • Colleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 43
        CBMac7

        @Leonora Thanks so much for the comment. I am still working on adding more information to my journal pages like you have done so beautifully on yours during this course.

    • Jane
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      jirwinromo
      I decided to compare these two plants in my back yard. It’s an unmanicured bluff overlooking Lake Michigan. Some of the vegetation was intentionally planted by the prior owner, but most is native happenstance. I think these two plants are natural inhabitants of the land. I have no idea what either one is, but am now curious to find out. The comparison study caused me to think about qualities that I might not have noticed if I were just looking at one plant by itself. 32D8EA73-E38C-43A6-B491-B1CD54FAF1EE
    • Stefania
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      Stefiex22
      I have tried a comparison study. Since I have seen the video I have started to notice things differently in the nature. I decided to compare two herbs and I have noticed different colors, texture, and leaves. By observing them during a comparison study I have noticed that parsley has got big leaves with a triad of leaves together while a thyme has got many leaves in a more symmetric shape. It was difficult to draw them, but the comparison observation made me thinking how many times I have not noticed things that are there. I do not like eating parsley, but after the comparison study I have to admit that I like its colors very much. It brings me happiness and light. Parsley vs Thyme
      • Paula
        Participant
        Chirps: 19
        EatingOnTwoWheels
        I've always thought that parsley TASTES happy!
    • candice
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      winchester
      I'm so far behind on this course I think I'm in front.  Yesterday I went out to do my comparison study, our first decent day weather-wise in two weeks.  Either freezing to death or drowning in rain!  Some Virginia spring!  I compared two common weeds, common cinquefoil and what is called Indian mock-strawberry.  Both have tiny yellow flowers.  Both have palmate leaves.  Both are growing abundantly with all the rain.  My sit spot is in our "bird garden," a mulched patch with old-growth trees, holly shrubs, about ten feeders of different kinds (viewable from our breakfast nook window), bird bath, and the fattest squirrels who live in condos in the big trees.  The feeders attract the usual suspects: cardinals, house finches, downies, red-bellies, nuthatches, tufted titmice, chickadees, mourning doves, "snowbirds" that have just left, blue jays, bluebirds, robins, catbirds (who knew they eat suet?), and northern flickers.  sketchbook1
      • Colleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 43
        CBMac7
        Thanks for sharing your Comparison study. I am having the same issue with the rain and the growth of both these weeds that I have just learned the name of. Love the details of your drawings.
      • Paula
        Participant
        Chirps: 19
        EatingOnTwoWheels

        @Colleen Three months of triple digit heat has gotten me behind, too! Yesterday I took some cuttings and drew them indoors!

    • Kirsten
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      kirstenlissa
      Our state parks reopened this week, so my husband and I headed to Enchanted Rock to hike the Echo Canyon Trail. I’m an official interpretive guide for the park but haven’t been able to lead any hikes since the pandemic. Only a few visitors are allowed at the park, must wear masks and social distance, so it was very peaceful with a lot less visitors than normal. It’s my favorite time of year at Enchanted Rock with all the gorgeous wildflowers blooming. I did an observation of two yellow flowers in bloom, the prickly pear cactus and a brown bitter weed. I loved the experience of detailing what I saw in the journal. I need a bigger journal for sure. I have much more I would have liked to write down if there was space.43C4205F-8973-4AA4-913C-A1DB0758E520
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      Nancr
      I did my comparison on a dangerous situation involving an invasive species threatening another species brought to the Americas in the 1800s, the honey bee.  A single Asian Giant Hornet can decimate a honey bee hive in about 3 hours.  If you see one of these hornet contact your state agriculture department. 15876910252449024793425789600751
      • Ann
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        abodkhe
        Hi Nancy, Thank you so much for posting this important page.  I admired your notes and your drawings, and now I’ll be able to identify that hornet.  Thanks. Ann
      • Leonora
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        noniebird

        @Ann Hi, Nancy. Wow, 2 inches long - that really is a giant hornet! AND it decapitates the poor honey bees - yikes. I don’t have any bee boxes, but have family/friends who do; they must be concerned. I’m so glad I read your journal pages, well done and topical. Many thanks.

    • Shir
      Participant
      Chirps: 29
      BirdShir
      Sketch Nature Journaling and Field Sketching Flower Comparison
    • Ramona
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      RLBrorson
      8507F1F8-951B-4044-9B98-0E049C72AC1D
    • Giuliana
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      giulianacpferrari
      It was quite fun to do a comparison study. Especially once you realise there's so many details you don't take in unless you are actively looking for diferences. As a field biologist I have no problems balancing drawing, writing and numbers and actually wonder how did it take me so long to start sketching the things I was seeing!   WhatsApp Image 2020-04-21 at 16.23.57
    • Mike
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      N8RGUY
      I wanted to do a comparison of some interesting birds but, with cool outdoor temperatures still (and limited access to parks due to the current COVID-19 lockdown), I used a postcard someone had sent me years ago showing six different owl heads. I chose two that I have personally seen and sketched them below, then looked in my bird guides for information on each one. 1) I learned there are many differences in colour, size, shape, and behaviour between the two species although they have common features, such as no ear tufts and large facial disks to gather light while hunting at night. 2) I think it's possible to combine drawings, written comments, and measurements or other numeriacal data on the journal page as they come to you (or as you find things in research material). This somewhat cluttered look appeals to me as it makes you study the finished page more carefully later when you want to review all the facts and features of the observations.     Comparison Study
    • Andrew
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      ajsibb
      I noticed the bend in the cedar branch and how they are related to the greenery, and how loose the twigs are. I took more time studying the underside of the hemlock needle, and how dense they are. So... more detail seen and investigated. Balancing data, text and drawings will take practice. Need to investigate more before drawings to determine what is needed, them lay out, leaving space for additional discoveries.image
    • Carol
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      carolrasowsky
      I found my first comparison study very difficult ... choosing to sketch two orchids was way too ambitious. It was challenging to get proportions right, to indicate texture and shading, and it was especially hard to capture the tiny details, but it was a great exercise in observing closely! I’m hoping the future lessons will help me improve my drawing skills.  As for a balance on my journal pages, I’ve followed Jack Laws’ videos for several months, and I have his book on Nature Journaling, so I had started developing a style, but got away from it when I started the course. I think it’s time to return to some of that now, in terms of how I lay out each page, and what I include. I love this course and am learning so much! Thank you, Liz!52F203EB-C40F-45B4-B014-A284134564D0
    • Mariana
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      marianabotero
      IMG_9930 I found it to be a useful exercise but once in the middle of it I realized choosing two more contrasting examples would have been better, since the two plants might just have been the same with different color and growth stages. Still useful as a practice tool. Also taught me to better organize comparison criteria: height, color, type of plant, leaf and petal dimensions and characteristics, etc... I went about it a little haphazardly. Great practice, nonetheless. Anything that sharpens the eye and trains you to observe and note, is good!
    • Dorothy D
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      DAnna_Dorothy
      IMG_0201 2 I sat outside for a short period on a chilly April day trying to sketch in between online classes I had to teach. I almost resented going back inside. I was in the edge of the woods so the Mayapples are already here and the invasive Garlic Mustard plants. As I walked through the woods I looked down and saw these as a  top down viewpoint. Of course the Garlic Mustard is taller than the parasol like Mayapples(no "apple" yet) and has already begun to flower with a 4 petal white flower and has ridged leaves versus the Mayapple with the symmetrical lobed leaves.
    • toni
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      toni787
      This was my first effort at field journal comparison journal. I had fun sitting on a stool in a small garden in my backyard during the “stay at home” order. I found so many interesting things to follow up on like the iridescent blue green fly that kept me company. I found out later that he is called a “long legged” fly and he is a decomposed. So fit right in with our lesson. I compared a gerbra daisy with a salvia. Here is my journal page, which really spilled over to another page because it was so interesting, I had to follow up on the internet with some questions.0BDEA2DE-59AB-495B-8A0F-D045E84857E4
    • Matt
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      mgoldberg
      I compared andromeda and leucothoe, both planted in my yard. I chose these because of some superficial similarities: general leaf shape, presence of dried flowers from last season, new spring flowers forming, overall shape and size of the shrub. By looking more closely, I could see that the form and branching was quite different. The arrangement of leaves (alternate on both) showed some observable differences, too. The andromeda appears from a distance has a rosette of leaves at the end of each branch. The leucothoe has alternating leaves at each node, and the stem itself zig-zags at each node, whereas the andromeda's stem remains straight at the nodes. IMG_5988
    • Ranae
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Puzzle Peace
      It's spring, so there's new growth in our yard.  I compared the new growth of an evergreen and a perennial.  Enlightening! When writing and recording as descriptive, the location/placement of info.  seems self-evident.  Artful?  A goal for sure, as is figuring out how to insert image.< ;DSCN0789
    • Jon
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Jonv54
      I did a comparison of two flowering plants that are forming mattes in my currently fallow garden area.  It really did help to focus attention on various details doing the comparison.  The two form very dense mattes, and appears there is some type of competition going on between them.  Putting two items on the same page is a great technique!20200405_Compare
    • Montana
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      mvasquezgrinnell
      I compared two plants in my house. It's been a bit tricky to get outside to do it while hiking with two kids and my husband (also I've been birding! Working on learning the sound!) Just as in the above video, the longer I looked at the plants, the more that I noticed and started off seeing their differences, but after a bit of time started to note some similarities that weren't readily obvious. I enjoyed the focused study! I think adding a lot of different type of information - measurements, height, shape, etc. gives a greater picture of something and in the future can help with identification or with recalling the moment. comparison study
    • Lora
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      lorarey
      Comparison Drawing 4 4 2020
    • Suzy
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      slyttle
      At first I didn't think that many details was that important on my first mushroom. Then when I started the second mushrooms I started to realize the differences. Some where very obvious but I wouldn't think it record the texture of the stalk on the first one if I didn't see how textured and complex the second one was. I started to compare everything: colors, shapes, where it grew, etc. It seems like that would come naturally but this activity really did forces me to pull out those details that we may take for granted on first glance. Compare
    • Jenny
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Jenny
      IMG-4816These are two conifers.  I first noticed their different shapes.  I continued to draw after I wrote my notes.  Maybe next time I'l take my notes on the side and add them to the page after the drawings are done.  I wanted to sketch the cones on the page but there is no room for that.
    • Avery
      Participant
      Chirps: 28
      boxturtlestudio
      20200402_122602I decided to compare 2 beetles. They had more differences than similarities. I made a table with some info about them. 20200402_12292320200402_122602
      • Isabel
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        IsabelTroyo
        I like your study and table very much
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio

        @Isabel Thank you so much. It took a long time to complete, but I learned a lot .  I really enjoy reading and seeing other student posts! Avery    

      • Deborah
        Participant
        Chirps: 9
        dtfoise
        The beetle study is just sooo pretty and I don't like beetles!  Did you use watercolor or watercolor pencils?
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio

        @Deborah Hi, thanks so much. I mostly used watercolor and some thin marker in tight dark places.

    • Leah
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      imchickadee
      I haven't done many comparison studies, but I have done some. I thought the comparison study helped me focus better on the unique characteristics of the black-capped and the chestnut-back chickadees that I was comparing, and the similarities between them. I learned that creating a comparison study can help you distinguish different and similar characteristics about two different things. When balancing drawing and writing in my journal, I think I will balance them depending on what I want to do that day, and what I want to write/draw about.
    • Isabel
      Participant
      Chirps: 30
      IsabelTroyo
      Estudio comparativo I have been observing this two different bird species for three months. Both are black and nest in the bougainvillea in front of my house. When I made this comparison study I notice that the Great-tailed Grackle  (left) has yellow eyes, is bigger with longer tail and beak than the Cowbird (right). Maybe he has a stronger beak so he can eat anything, he can eat from the garbage bags. The Cowbird is chubby, has red eyes and is not aggresive as the Great tailed Grackle.
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio
        Very nice watercolors and study!
      • Leonora
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        noniebird
        Beautiful bird renderings!
      • Alisha
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        alishabirdie
        I'm captivated!  Beautiful!
    • sherry
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      sherlee00
      We were in Florida back in February and we were camping at Devil’s Den in Williston .  The days were warm and I sat at a picnic table and drew these two items.  They have totally different textures and I was trying to use the hatching, contour hatching, and some scribbling in this exercise.   I learned that these techniques help to convey depth and texture like whether something is smooth or rough.image
    • Suzanne
      Participant
      Chirps: 22
      Suzy64
      IMG_7024I compared the leaves of three backyard plants. The rhododendron and the laurel were very similar and symmetrical while the azalea was quite different with a rather random, but connected series of paths, suggesting that the laurel and rhododendron might be related. The actual rhodie and laurel plants themselves are quite different though and the laurel shape is more closely related to the azalea in shape with multiple stems coming from the ground rather than one or two stems rising with multiple off shoots like the rhodie.
    • John
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Peckalot
      Great toi have a chance to record and define what I see.IMG_0913
    • Wendy
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      wave24
      Just exactly that..I need to focus to even see the differences. It’s a discipline thing. Drawing , writing, recording come naturally if you are concentrating on only one or two items. the short notation with a dot before it works for me interspersed with the drawings.The research that follows, the questions asked are equally important to me.
    • Mudito
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      Mudito
      imageI finally completed my comparison of the Junco and Chickadee both of which frequent our feeder.  I am still not drawing from the real thing - this is from the Sibley Field Guide but it did allow me to really see the differences in their form and to focus on differences in behaviour.  No modelling in the drawings but maybe I will do that later.  Scribbling is useful.
    • Koen
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Nahtur
      I have a small grove in my garden is covered with Lesser Prewinkle.  Only two yards from it,  Balkan Anemones have been conquering the gravel path. The flowers of both plants  have a very similar purple violet color and the plants are also similar in height. ( a few inches) .  But all the rest is quite different: I noticed different shapes of the leaves (shiny and single /opposite  and smooth edged  versus  mat and composite/ dented). Flower stem were bold versus hairy.  The five  petals of the Prewinkle merge into a tube shape at the base of the flower with five sepals. The Anemone has about fourteen petals, but I couldn’t find any sepals! This triggered my curiosity and after  consulting some botanical websites, the mystery was solved:  The ‘petals’  seem to be false and are actually colored sepals! This was a true eye opener. Without this drawing excercise, it would never come to my mind that I was looking at a flower chalice..NJ 3 Observation comaprison
    • Adrienne
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      mystierodan
      Finally getting back to the class after a longer hiatus during the holidays that expected. For this exercise I studied two nests, it was a good way to make more focused observations than just looking at one object.IMG_4444
      • Leonora
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        noniebird
        Your nest drawings are wonderful. I find drawing nests very challenging, because even though they appear messy, they actually have organization and symmetry. You did a great job! 👍🏻
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      Lindabeekeeper
      This exercise helped me really observe the different attributes of the two types of tree flowers.  I think it will help me identify species. comparison
    • Colleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      colleencc
      It is still too cold to do anything outside here, where I live. I collected a group of tiny coniferous cones that were all attached together on a branch (group of branches) on the ground where they had fallen, and used these in a comparison with a larger pine cone. The pine cone was a little smaller than fist sized and the group of 9 small cones were similar or just a little smaller than the pine cone.  I wish I knew what kind of tree the tiny cones were from (they are not hemlock, as I do know what those are like). I honestly can't say what I learned from this, aside from careful observation of details which I think I would have done just from the fact of drawing them anyway.
    • David
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      David Santos
      This exercise was not too dificult to do. Focus in the subjects allow me to think more about real structure. I think I made 2 attempts before I was happy with what I saw. Using what is taught, helped me to catch the volume of the birds (at least I think so). I made a list of the birds that will be add in the reply. I don't think I missed any bird.90028727_1293887660794510_2404200345862406144_n (1)
      • David
        Participant
        Chirps: 21
        David Santos
        89941274_199360571395320_5828356459888377856_n The list of birds observed
    • TJ
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      T__jay
      IMG_3235 1. A deeper level of detail was observed on each plant during the comparison study. Working back and forth between each plant/sketch provided specific items to look at on each. 2. I like an equal balance of writing/data and drawing in my journal. I feel all provide valuable observation cues and information for reference later.
    • Kimbrell
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      sks.frazier
      2020 03 08 Comparison
    • Kimbrell
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      sks.frazier
      I went walking on the nearby riverwalk without know what to compare. There were 2-3 dozen mallards in one area so I thought I'd just observe them but as I did, I began to notice differences. My pare was not laid out as a comparison study because I thought I'd just be observing them! IMG_1220IMG_1220
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      whipporwheel
      Holly HemlockThis is my comparison study, holly and hemlock.  I did see many differences that I might not have otherwise noted.
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio
        • Really nice study!
    • Student Birder
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      trudy10024
      Oak comparisonM:F oak flowers
    • Kimbrell
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      sks.frazier
      I went for a walk on the riverwalk nearby without knowing what I was going to see or compare. I found an area with 2-3 dozen ducks and as I watched them and took notes I started seeing differences in them. My comparison is not separated like the one in the lesson, because it started out as observations, only. I really enjoyed my time watching the ducks and would never have noticed many of the details if I had just taken photos. IMG_1220IMG_1221
    • Geminis
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      geminis
      20200305_174339
    • Student Birder
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      trudy10024
      I compared male and female flowers of the oak tree and found that the male flowers with their long pollen-filled clusters of flowers can lead to early spring allergies.  I also compared the acorns and leaves of the northern red oak and pin oak trees.comparison oak acornscomparison M & F oak flowers
    • Student Birder
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      trudy10024
            Oak comparisonM:F oak flowersI sent two comparison studies--one of the two acorns and leaf types in the northern red oak and the pin oak. The second is a comparison of the male and female flowers on a single oak tree.  Oaks are monoecious and so have both male and female reproductive flowers on the same tree.  It was interesting to read about this and realize that some spring allergies come from the pollen from the male flowers that will open up very soon. -- Trudy I am not sure you got the drawings.  I will add them again to this submission.  
    • Kim
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      kheiss
      297B68CE-BA42-4D91-8C47-67CACC843AFA
    • Janet
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Jafodal
      IMG_5387
      • Janet
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        Jafodal
        I chose to compare leaves, samara, and buds from a sugar maple and red maple.  I had laminated the leaves in the fall for a children's activity so they were in good condition.   I knew they were different but had not spent focused time on the ways in which they were.  I noticed many differences: the larger size of the sugar maple, the smooth edges of the sugar vs the serrated edges of the red maple, the darker color of the sugar's petiole, the rounder shape of the red's buds and the spacing between each side of the samaras.  Questions that were raised for me included why one leaf would have smooth edges and one toothed.  Is there an advantage for photosynthesis?  Does it provide a greater surface area to receive CO2?  Why is one leaf smaller than the other?  Does it correlate to the size of the tree?  I did note the shapes of the trees in small drawing to the lower left of each leaf.  The sugar maple is clearly larger in both width and height than the red maple.  The sugar maple can grow to about 66' while the red maple has a maximum height of about 49'.  I appreciated the focus this activity offered and the observations I was able to make.   I definitely prefer to draw to help me hone my observations with writing coming in second and counting at third.
      • Leonora
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        noniebird

        @Janet Hi Janet, Your leaf study is wonderful. You took something so simple and really captured the tiny details. Now I want to draw leaves!

    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      thechubbywoman
      I did my comparison study on the feet of American Coots and Mallard ducks.  Coots have lobed toes and very sharp toenails; Mallards have webbed feet and somewhat flat toenails.  Coots legs and feet are a mix of blue gray, green, and yellow; Mallard feet and legs are various shades of orange and umber.  The toe formation, webbing variance and different colors made me wonder why the birds were put together like that. 20200301_105614 The Coots are more or less confined to marsh lands.  Their lobed toes give them traction in the water when they’re swimming, but the separation between the toes also allows for more flexibility on land and walking through and over matts of marsh plants.  The Coots also use their feet in dominance battles. I would assume that the light color of their legs and feet make it less likely that predators under the water could see them, and might mistake them for wafting plant frond.  On land, they WALK rather than WADDLE. I know that Mallards are the ancestors of all of the domestic duck (except the Muscovy) and they can thrive in a variety of habitats.  Although they nest on ground, they spend a lot of time in the water feeding and displaying to one another. Obviously, their webbed feet make it easier to maneuver in the water while still allowing them to travel on land.  The orange color, though, is suddenly interesting to me.  Why such a bright and obvious color on their feet?  I did a little more research on them and discovered that the color of their feet can vary depending on their age and hormone levels. The feet turn bright orange in the breeding season, signaling to others that they’re old enough and healthy enough to breed. On land, the ducks WADDLE rather than WALK.
      • Sarah
        Participant
        Chirps: 10
        Sarah46
        Bravo to a wonderful comparison of the feet and follow-up to the question it evoked!   It is really too cold where I live to get out and do a comparison study but cannot wait to try my hand at it.
    • Juan
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      Juan Jo
      I learn to see the little things in nature and some details. It's a matter of the things you like, for example I like more drawing than writting and numerical data, 70% drawing, 20% writting and 10% numerrical data. image0 (2)
    • Curt & Jeanne
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      heuersthree
      sketch3 Two orchids , one tiny , one very large.  Leaves the same on both. Though the flowers differ in size their structure is very similar with larger "elephant ear" petals and tiny beards at the end of the front of the flower. I need to pay more attention to note-taking.
    • Deanna
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      whobblet
      IMG_4719I 1. I choose to draw two regular visitors to my patio for my comparison study. The dark-eyed juncos are year round visitors while the chestnut backed chickadees have only appeared this fall/winter. It's made me wonder why they aren't here year round (at my feeder, anyway) and if there is competition for nesting sites and food with their cousins, the black-capped chickadees which are more numerous.  The chickadees prefer the peanuts I leave out for them and the nuthatches while the juncos are content to hop around on the patio and in the planters feasting on the suet crumbs that other birds with messy eating habits (such as the flickers) fling around when they  hang and feast from the suet block.
    • Betty
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Bee Kay
      I'm including my comparison drawing and remarks about the Downy Woodpecker and the Hairy Woodpeckers that I see at my feeders this winter.  Screen Shot 2020-02-17 at 2.09.33 PM
    • Daniel
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      sphawk74
      IMG_8647
    • Karla
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Pikagirl
      IMG_7044 I have two cats -  a large gray striped cat and a fat black cat.  Odin, the striped cat, realized I was drawing him and left.  Data, stayed put longer.
    • Crystal
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Crystalbco
      20AE7A4D-72F2-48AD-AF81-B7A5380E7A0E I did a comparison of two tree next to each other, one was a giant cottonwood tree all twisted and rough bark, the other was a smaller tree with several small trunks, finer bark and narrow leaves.  It was enjoyable to spend a long time just observing two different trees.  I noticed when I was walking back to my car, that I was observing all the different trees and how the bark and tree trunks looked.
    • Heidi
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      HeidiTas
      Comparison Study I compared two species of gum trees in an area of forest that had a prescribed fuel-reduction burn about 12 months ago.  These gums almost always survive fire and it was interesting to look at the differences in the post-burn growth of two trees side-by-side. I felt that the exercise was incomplete until I went home to look up which species these were.  (There are 29 species of Eucalypt in Tasmania where I live.)  Knowing which species I was comparing somehow made the observation seem more satisfying for me. I thought about comparing a third species, but it wasn't a gum, it was Banksia, which I decided was too different for this comparison.  But I started to look at the tree more closely anyways as they were all dead, none survived the fire. They need fire to open the large hard seed cones, which had me ready to start drawing again and making different observations.  So this very focused, close-up exercise was interesting for me.
    • Christine N.
      Participant
      Chirps: 38
      cnykwest
      This is where I stalled b/c life got in the way! Moving on...
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Saliog
      I compared 2 plants growing next to each other at the root of a tree. Ferns grew out of mulch of oak leaves in the valley of roots. Moss grew on tree itself. The different growth areas may influence the characteristics. Fern: 5-8” stems with several dozen upturned flat blue-green elongated oval leaves growing alternately and tapering from narrower at both ends to wider in the middle. Growing out of soil....nutrients available from rich mulch. Fern did not grow where moss was. Moss: carpet-like 1/2” thick layer spread over square foot of bark with many varied shades of yellow green shoots tangled together...more surface area to trap water, etc. since it is growing out of bark? Moss did not grow where fern was. function...shape and number of leaves related to how plants collect nutrients, water, and light? change...these plants remained bright green in the winter forest...processing light energy all year long? scale...they are small plants compared to the trees around them. Do they thrive with more sun when tree leaves are down? quantity...small in size and number, but persist throughout the forest system...fern grew from rotting oak leaves, moss on the living tree trunk...what do they offer tree in return? Plants did not overlap into each other’s s territory. No moss under fern, no fern on moss. The plants all grew in one nook of tree root systems...what was the direction? Comparison made me look and think harder, and therefore observe more. 64D31530-2759-4408-848A-BC1B6902F35FI enjoy the sketching to focus my attention. I need to leave more room for notes, which I added after the sketch...maybe leave bigger area to do that as I think of things while I draw so I don’t forget. Quantitative data was all estimated...take a little tape measure. I think a big rough, kind of minimalist sketch with expanded views of interesting areas would work better than a detailed overall sketch. Use a slightly bigger sketch book. Add color to sketches.
    • Tanis
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      tanislynn
      This was a very interesting exercise. Comparing really helped me focus on the differences where before I just noticed the similarities. I decided to do a balsam fir and spruce because while I can recognize them from a distance I continually confuse them when walking through the woods. Sitting down and drawing the bark and noting the growth pattern of the needles has helped fix it in my mind. Since it was cool sitting outside for an extended time I brought the spruce bough inside to sketch and did the fir from memory. However then I began to question the accuracy of the fir drawing. Bringing in a branch helped me look closely and more deeply at it. This is an exercise that I will continue to do. After looking at some of the other work I see how my records need more numerical data.
    • Phyllis
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      pcarterjack
      The comparison project fit perfectly with my desire to identify the center seedling. (For assurance about its ID I will wait until spring!) I needed to confirm the ID of the other two plants, also. This area of my front yard is recovering from damage during the Harvey storm in 2017 so I am observing those changes, doing a comparative study, and sketching.
    • Phyllis
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      pcarterjack
      image
    • BJORN
      Participant
      Chirps: 37
      suzukiawd13
      20200127_181421-1-1
      • BJORN
        Participant
        Chirps: 37
        suzukiawd13
        I chose an ornamental fruit vine, and an evergreen, in a pot. Both contrasting in seasonal value, and value. One being fruit, the other fruitless. And one being relatively unchanging (evergreen) and one being a bloomer of fruit, to having no fruit (tangerine.) thx. bk. "THE ORANGE BOWL VS. THE EVERGREEN GAME."
    • Claire
      Participant
      Chirps: 29
      Cwknapp5440
      I was very encouraged when I looked at the pages of my fellow students to try the colors and got very excited by the Koi Watercolors. I then added color to my last pages and what a difference it makes. I am also adding another attempt at the comparison study. I used two types of onions. the first is a sweet onion and the second is a yellow onion. I'm getting used to the colors and realize that the journal I am using doesn't have the greatest paper for watercolor. It is not a pure white page for one thing, and it doesn't release paint or blend like Archers which has been my favorite for years. I will try the ringed notebook that you recommended. IMG_0029 crop This is my second comparison described above drawn January 27, 2020 at 2:00 inside on a very snowy day here in CO. IMG_0028 crop  
    • Claire
      Participant
      Chirps: 29
      Cwknapp5440
      The date is January, 26, 2020. I began drawing at 1:45 and finished at 2:25. It is a sunny, cold day with the wind blowing the light snow off the buildings so I stayed inside looking out the door to the balcony to our condo in Breckenridge, CO. I compared two evergreen trees: No. 1 is a Lodge pole pine, No. 2 is a Colorado blue spruce. The foliage is spare on the pine and my summation is that because it was formerly a forest the sunlight was restricted to the trees and so the foliage is always at the top third of the tree. The Spruce is denser and the needles as shorter than the pine, probably no more than an inch long on the longest, and the frond is probably anywhere from 3 inches to 10 with these needles coming out all sides of the frond. The branches start out sloping slightly down but then make a graceful turn upwards with continuous fronds of needles diminishing in length as the branch gets longer. The needles of the Pine are probably about three inches long and seem to stem from the end of a small twig which is attached to the larger branch. These larger branches slope down from the trunk of the tree and then make a graceful curve upward and are very wavy when the wind blows. The trunk of the pine is more warm brown, very rough with little holes in it probably form birds like the Cross Bills we saw pecking on the trees last fall. I think it is also Downy Woodpeckers who might make those holes. The bark of the Blue spruce seems to have small scale like flakes that are closely attached to the trunk. These seem to reflect the light when it falls on them through the dense branches. My drawing of the branches of the blue spruce doesn't give the effect of the denseness of the foliage, because I stopped with the detail and only drew the slope of the branches going out from the tree. Imagine the whole tree going to the ground with the density of the detail I drew in the top half of the picture. There were clumps of snow on occasional branches which held more than the smaller more individual foliage of the Lodge pole pine. This was a fun exercise to do and I will look forward to doing more when there are flower again in Colorado, or when I get home to Denver and my bird feeders. IMG_0025
    • Belinda
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      beekeev
      IMG_0345
    • Gail
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Gcoffeywriter
      I really enjoyed this journal practice.  I spent almost an hour observing and illustrating the bark of an American beech and White Pine bark.  The bark was strikingly different.  The beech bark had lots of lichens and I noticed that the majority of its lichens were black, spider-web like strands that branched out like club moss in different directions.  There were more lichens on the north side of the tree due to the moisture and coolness on that side.  The white pine had very thick, plate-like strips of bark that were very rough and had no lichens on it.  It was located next to the beech so even though they were in the same location, there were no lichens on it.  Very interesting to look so closely at the bark of two trees and to see the amazing colors and shapes. I like the idea of having more illustrations with some observations rather than writing.  I will probably continue my nature poetry and illustrations as part of my journal work as it brings in a spiritual aspect that does not occur when being more scientific about my journal and observations.   Comparison of Tree Bark
    • Leslie
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      lesliehthomas
      KWDGanJvSUqSF54D+z80kQ_thumb_1a33
    • Leslie
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      lesliehthomas
      sCynPuzjT8KWa4YPRQ1OUA_thumb_1a34I studied two kinds of hummingbirds at the feeders in Barbados. It took me a while to discover that there were really two types, and then I became more aware of their difference in size and in their beak shape. One kind that comes rarely has a crest- but only on the male- so then I realized that for some varieties I could differentiate not only their type but sex.
    • Sallie
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      salliebarker
      IMG_1280 I made this comparison study of two October seeds, one is invasive and one is very necessary to our region.  I appreciated the time I spent counting the seeds inside the milkweed pod - and I do hope that those 30+ seeds will work their magic in my yard next spring.
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio
        Nice job!
    • LeslieAnne
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      lasanford
      I decided to draw from a couple of botanical prints since the weather outside is quite frightful, and thoughts of flowers give me hope through long winter evenings. The comparison study really helped me to focus on the details of the flower petals and stems, and then to wonder about how the differences worked to attract pollinators. Do the larger, flashier iris flowers attract larger pollinators than the delicate petals of myosotis? Why do  the smaller flowers grow in clumps of larger numbers of flowers than the more dramatic iris? The study definitely lead to lots of questions about form and function. I need to work on better organizing the written and drawn parts on the page.6CB09CD6-9D6D-46D4-A712-FB46278BC260
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 30
      susangreta
      Here is my comparison study. It's very cold here (on Cape Cod) and so I needed to run in and out of the house to check details. I am fascinated by lichens so I chose two different types growing on the same tree. I found pieces of the lichens (fluffy shrubby oneComparison_exercise is Usnea "old man's beard" and the flat, lobular is a Parmontrema) in the leaf litter on the ground and brought them inside, as it was impossible to sit outside in the freezing weather. Ended up using a magnifying glass to see exactly what was going on in detail. Challenges were the meticulous tiny details in which the different shading techniques we've learned came in very handy. But also I wanted to indicate the color and couldn't quite capture the chalky quality of their color.
      • Claire
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Cwknapp5440
        I love your drawings. Did you use ink? Adding the limited color as you did is very effective
      • Susan
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        susangreta

        @Claire Hi Claire, thanks for the comment. I didn't use ink, I usedthe twisty erase pencil that we bought for the class. It's pretty dark on the paper and easy to draw with and build up the dark areas. I also used water over the pencil to soften it and smudge. I limited colors because I think we were supposed to be focusing on drawing... and it's easy to get carried away with the watercolors (ok and 1 tube of white gouache to try to get the chalky effect!). I'm way behind on classes, my work has gotten away with me!

      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio
        • Interesting subject, great job!
    • Chris
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      HeartBirds
      Sketching forced me to look at the differences in detail of shape, color texture, etc.  Those differences made me wonder if they were a function of environment, eg, did they blend in better where they lived with those differences? Did they prefer different places? For example, the Box Crab prefers rocks & muddy bottoms, the Kelp Crab is found in the intertidal zone, the Red Rock Crab is found on jetties, intertidal pools & under & around rocks. CrabCompareSketch
    • margaret
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      pegganne
      comparison
    • Casside
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      casside.blake
      imageimageimage
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      jenajacobs
      IMG_7102
    • Edith
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      eharte
      From Nov 15-25 I worked on a comparison study of 2 main species of duck- American black ducks and hooded mergansers  that have arrived to a local marsh over the past 2-3 weeks. I started taking the journal outside with the "sit spot" observation, then took it to several marsh area ponds where I found the ducks over several succeeding days. I learned a lot about how ducks feed and behave. Am. Blacks are rather sedentary and feed on the shorelines by ducking their heads or tipping up. They have broad flatish beaks. The hooded mergansers are 1/2-2/3 the size, are much more active, swimming extremely fast and diving for food further from shore frequently staying down 10-20 seconds and maybe more. Their beaks are small, long and narrow- maybe more functional for diving, catching and eating fish. They are more difficult to observe, seldom seen still, rarely sit on land,  generally stay further away more often feeding in the middle of water bodies. I did most of the writing and outline drawing outside  which makes the journal pages seem messy and unbalanced. Inside, I painted successively closer views of the ducks to try to capture some of the differences in form, function and behavior. I have never painted landscapes, when I tried,  I had no place to write. I will work on page balance. I will upload 3 images if it works: the sit spot; the duck comparison done outside, and the inside page done on 3 successive days.   'IMG_0691IMG_0692IMG_0696 I can't imagine dealing with the watercolor set outside. Maybe with a little luck and experimentation I will figure it out by spring. I am very much enjoying this course and seeing all of the beautiful and interesting work that the students are doing in their journals. It is eye-opening! Edith
    • Arien
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      adwidrick
      Really enjoyed this exercise! I thought it would be interesting, but hadn't realized how many small details I never would've noticed otherwise. Especially on these two rather small plants that I wouldn't have studied otherwise. Can't wait to do more comparisons. My dad and I both drew the same plants and were able to compare what we noticed (he's enrolled in the course too). Super fun!IMG_0863
      • Claire
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Cwknapp5440
        What beautiful fine drawing. Mine get so messy. I'm hoping to develop the ability to get it right the first time.
    • Craig
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      cmflyer
      I tried out the watercolor with this comparison of two anemone species in my reef tank. Not a huge amount of detail described here on my page, but I think it was a worthwhile comparison. I could get more balance with the numerical data perhaps by making a data table. IIMG_1449
    • Madeleine
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      mlenagh
      Too cold and damp to sit outside, so I brought two autumn leaves in. My first thoughts were, "Of course I know the difference between Walnut and Beech. But as I continued to study them, more and more details popped up, and with them, more and more questions. Some not noted on the page, for instance: Why is one stem long and the other short? Does that have to do with the leaf staying on the tree longer? journal
    • S
      Participant
      Chirps: 32
      twistybear
      IMG_20191126_084232407IMG_20191126_092119934Comparison of our two cats:  Catherine et Tile Both were adopted from the SPA 3 years ago now. Catherine is round with short legs.  She has an amazing coat with swirls, dots, spots, and stripes. Apparently, swirls are a more recent adaptation in cat coats. Her legs are short and her tail is too thick and she chirps instead of meowing.  She's obsessed with her food. She is very social and she's quite entertaining.  She likes to live indoors, even though she has acess to outdoors when she wants through the cat door.  Her coat is smooth with almost a lanolin like feeling.  Hunting is not her idea of time well spent.  She goes outside only when absolutely necessary or to be with us when we are out there.  In the summer she enjoys survying her royaume from the wheelbarrow where she is off the ground and protected from all the scary things outside.   She does chase insects and one year nearly destroyed my daphne by jumping into it to catch the butterflies that were visiting its flowers. Tile is an outdoor cat.  He has very long legs.  When he runs; it's like watching a feather skipping along the ground.  In the summer he only comes in to eat.  He's a serious hunter.  He often brings me the mice he's caught, his loud voice annoucing his prize before I see him.  He has very long claws that are very sharpe.  He defends our yard from other cats.  He's very brave except when it comes to men.  He does not trust them, and perfers to hide rather than meet them.  When he first arrived he was very suspicious of everyone.  Now he's much better.  His coat is very soft with very fine hair that are longer than Catherine's.  His markings are like ticking, more like a wild cat.  His tail ends abruptly like it's been cut off.  It is often bent at the end as if it has been broken. I hope you can see in the sketches that they have very different morphology.
      • Becky
        Participant
        Chirps: 1
        Avid Reader
        your drawings are  very well done! I could clearly see the differences between the two cats faces and eyes. You descriptive text had me chuckling...as a fellow cat lover...I could visualize the personalities of your two pets. You have to live with a cat to really know it's preferences, fears, activity level, and how affectionate it is. You have caught the nuances in your cats behavior and caught the feelings that may have caused the behavior. I have 3 daughters, who each have 2 rescue cats, and I marvel at their different personalities. Endlessly fascinating. Terrific comparison study!
      • S
        Participant
        Chirps: 32
        twistybear

        @Becky Thanks very much for taking the time to read.

    • holly
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      hollysnuts
      1. For years I've unknowingly been doing comparison studies [without having the terms to describe and enhanced knowledge of how to more properly sketch comparatively]. It was simply my curiosity to test the little I'd learned & my desire to make things better on my sketch pad. Using anchor points, her reminder to use what she already taught us about negative space and her willingness to use her ERASURE [as I made smudgy left-handed sketches] when we worked or were trying to clean things up on the pad will be always useful. 2, I've studied language & fancied myself a writer more than an artist, but after this class at Cornell I'm going to enjoy being both. With my memory problems [because of my epilepsy] Fuller's reminder to record dates, times & places my own sketch pad would make me a better  secretary that the writer & artist could use. IMG_2719IMG_2721
    • David
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      yabking
      WinterbudsI did a comparison of winter buds from three different trees: oak, cottonwood, and sweetgum.  I was actually surprised with the differences I observed, and am starting to get into the habit of asking questions about nature differences in general.  For my journal, I actually prefer drawings over words, but did find the process of thinking about questions helped me to differentiate the buds in the drawings.
      • Claire
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Cwknapp5440
        That is a great idea for me in cold Colorado right now, and you did a great job capturing the real thing.
    • patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      paakre
      November 22, 2019 Central Park
    • Jennifer
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Beegirl
      For my comparison sketch I tried comparing two very similar objects - Oak Leaves.  I was amazed at the differences between two objects that one might think are so similar.  I really enjoyed it, and will probably use this technique more often. My journal tends to be a mix of writing, drawing, and data.  It tends to vary depending on what I am observing.  This one was more drawing than writing.NatJournalComparison
    • Kim
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      kmitc210
      I wasn't too excited about this exercise because it's dark and cold outside (Minnesota in November), but I found some seedheads in my little prairie. And, typical of this class, found that once I got started I loved it and am excited to do this again tomorrow.  Amazed at what I see when I take the time to slow down and look. I can see how this will help me improve my identifications. seedhead comparison2_20191118
    • Pat
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      ptfojut
      WIN_20191117_13_03_45_Scan WIN_20191117_13_03_12_Scan I enjoy the comparison technique, need to go outside when the sun comes out. WIN_20191117_13_02_39_Pro
    • Martha Davis
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      pattonmd
      IMG_4895-1 Here I'm comparing the bark of three trees--an oak (about 15" in diameter), a young maple (about 9" in diameter), and a Ponderosa pine (also about 9-10" in diameter but older than the maple and much, much more deeply fissured).  Surprising to me was that the vertical-ish lines of the oak and pine had much more horizonal-ish hatching up close and the almost horizontal rings of the maple had much more vertical and web-like lines (very light, almost white) upon closer look. The oak bark reminded me of an Escher drawing--as if each "leg" of various "chromosome-shaped X's" blended into the next "X." This beautiful bark was much more challenging than I expected to draw! A process aside: I'm going to have to shift from pencil--all my pages are getting uniformly smudy!
      • Claire
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Cwknapp5440
        What a beautiful journal page. I love the way you interwove your comments with your pictures. It isn't messy and looks planned. I have trouble with that.
    • Mary
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Ravon43
      This exercise made for way more questions. I took two samples from our yard of pine trees. They were very different and provided lots of points of comparisons. When I went to identify them, it was not so easy. As it turns out there are a lot of pine trees in the state of Colorado. I identified them as Blue Spruce and Ponderosa Pine, but there were also other pines they might have been i.e. Scotch Pine. When I googled Ponderosa Pine it mentioned that the bark might smell like vanilla or butterscotch. Sure enough when I scrapped the bark it smelled like vanilla. (Power of suggestion?) The Blue Spruce did have a distinctive smell. Did that come from the needles or sap? I do enjoy trying to render these exercises in watercolor. I think my blue spruce needles could have used a little more blue in the green. I also enjoyed learning the names for the different parts of the pinecones and needles. IMG_0676
      • Craig
        Participant
        Chirps: 20
        cmflyer
        Beautiful comparison page! I'm looking forward to graduating to watercolor soon, but I'm still in the pencil phase. Curious, how did you do the date? Completely by hand?
      • Claire
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Cwknapp5440
        When I did my tree shapes I never thought of just focusing on just the needles and cones. I love it. Maybe I should break off a twig and cone and work inside to finish off my journal page of Lodge pole pine and Blue spruce comparison
    • Christi-June
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      christijune
      20191110_212619I set out to do a comparison study not knowing what I would find. Comparing these two similar birds got me thinking why the markings around their eyes are similar and how it is beneficial to them. I think when it comes to balancing writing, drawing and recording numerical data, my particular style will develop over time. As for now, I concentrate on the illustration and make comments and markings as I go.
    • Denise
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      dchaffner
      It is snowing in TN, so my comparison is with house plant and cut flower. This is a perfect exercise on comparison. I found a plant that grows in clumps and then a single strong stem supporting a clump flower head. I really enjoyed the comparison. image
    • Karen O
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      KarenOlgaz
      FF1D5472-CC0B-41A6-A2F1-FDF25C2F1599
    • Helen
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Helen B
      Fun exercise for a cold, snowy day! 860E44F0-F95C-4FD2-B20A-1B71D109787F
      • Susan
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        susangreta
        I like the bark technique! The texture looks so real. I was daunted by the bark on which my lichens were growing so did not focus on it. Now I'll try these techniques next time.
    • Janet
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      riversedgemn
      Looking at two different items with the intent to draw them to show their differences certainly does slow me down and fine tune my observation skills. And while I was able to basically sketch the differences in color and anatomy, I just don’t have the artistic skills to make the images more interesting and three dimensional and lifelike, so that frustrates me. The act of trying to draw each set of flowers and leaves does help imprint on my mind the differences between the two, but if I waited a while before using a key to key them out, I wonder if the drawings would be sufficient to prompt my memory about the details. A647DC68-E29C-42DD-9FA0-E424FE9FC702
    • Chloe
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      ChloeMB
      Since most plants are dead here, I chose to compare two rocks. I thought that it would be hard to find a lot of information on them, but when I dove deeper, there were lots of hidden details. This was a very meaningful exercise. I think that we go by so many beautiful things each day, that we don't take enough time to look at the details. This got me in the headspace to become more motivated, and it was also quite relaxing.
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      amy_jay_bee
      There’s so much information I want to get in that it’s hard to get it on the page, and between my lack of drawing practice and a certain rush to do the work, the art is literally sketchy. Even working as quickly as I could, this took me about an hour and a half. But I really enjoy the chance to observe. I spend a lot of time grubbing up Bermuda grass and crab grass, so this was a “know thy enemy” exercise. By the time I was done I at least appreciated the structure of both grasses and understood a bit better how they spread. And I’d never noticed the pretty purple on some of the Bermuda grass stems before. Now I’m curious why some are purple and some aren’t. 7B29A5C5-2AB4-4456-8F0E-F421C1342871
    • Isabelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Isaduvernois
      I have been waiting for my weekend to do this. Finally, it is Saturday but it was 12 degrees this morning! So I went to pick up some freshly fallen leaves in my yard. I picked up 2 very different leaves fallen from one of my purple Smoke bushes. They are quite distinct, which really intrigues me since they come from the same tree. The mise-en-page is quite improvised, a bit messy, I had a lot of descriptions to record and not enough room on my small pad. I’ve got to think of that next time. Anyway, here they are. Nice seeing everyone’s work. Thanks for sharing y’all. Isabelle C816C69E-A0B6-4C69-90A7-44FA2DAC7F30
    • Laurie
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      BartelsBirders
      GrassComparisonThis was my first comparison study and I enjoyed the experience. No doubt, even though my fingers felt warm upon starting, had they not cooled off 30 minutes later then I would still be outdoors sketching and observing. This comparison study of grasses reminded me that comparing and contrasting can be a highly effective way to learn about something. The questions that arose are mainly based around the labeling of parts - flowers, stalks, stems, leaves, grass - I do not know what to properly name each part of the grasses. Had my fingers not gotten cold, I would have mustered the umph to draw a close up of each grass's flowers. They have similarities but are not the same. I like sketching what I see, labeling parts and then using the drawing and my observations to prompt my words. This lets me practice the skill - drawing - that I'm trying to learn. I incorporated numerical data, which likely would not have happened if this exercise had been done without seeing Liz's modeling it in her example. Certainly, the use of numerical data adds credence to a scientific observation, while also enhancing the descriptiveness of what is being viewed. FYI I am thoroughly enjoying myself in this course! I set aside time each weekend to do one or two parts of a chapter, not wanting to rush on any given day and hoping to make this class last well into December. Thank you Liz and Bird Academy!
    • Viki
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      VikiLawrence
      I guess I like to work big!  I compared 3 seed heads / pods as it's winter and NO flowers, even the leaves are all gone.  This was very fun and I did get to wonder about prickles, opposite vs. alternate leaves (I could tell by the attachment points that remained) and stem striations.  I liked having all the information, drawing, writing, as well as a little bit about size.  This lesson was very useful for me to think about all the things that can vary from subject to subject.   MilkweedsunflowerTeasel
      • Robin
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        CamilleFuille
        These are great. I was working on a milkweed pod, too, and I noticed that the seeds, which I always "knew" were a flat ellipse/teardrop shape with a seed in the middle and a skrim of "wing" on the perimeter, are actually curved like a human spine when observed from the side. Perhaps this allows them to catch a lighter breeze or travel further?
      • Martha Davis
        Participant
        Chirps: 18
        pattonmd
        You've inspiring! You model close observation of a variety of issues on your seed pods--and pose questions.
      • Claire
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Cwknapp5440
        Very nice composition of your page and beautiful drawings.
    • Valerie P Stevens
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      valeriepstevens
      Flower comparisons
    • Valerie P Stevens
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      valeriepstevens
      I have really enjoyed the comparison drawings.  It has created a deeper layer of observation and patience.  I found this beautiful Maple leaf on a hike and brought it home to draw; then, a few days later found the Oak leaf.  Both leaves were inspiring in different ways.  Thank you for this exercise!
    • Valerie P Stevens
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      valeriepstevens
      Maple LeafOak Leaf
      • Janice
        Participant
        Chirps: 9
        janlan
        These leaves are stunning. The colors are so beautiful. Well done!
      • Sallie
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        salliebarker

        @Janice I agree!  Valerie, are you using colored pencils or watercolors?  Your colors are so vibrant!

    • Julia
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      JKelly1963
      IMG_4763   I really enjoyed drawing these 2 flowers.  I used a picture that I took back in September.  There was enough information in the picture that I took to record the flowers and the leaves for each plant.  This was really fun.  I will be doing more of these types of studies.  Thank you!
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      LindaMizzell
      I enjoyed this comparison study as it encouraged me to focus on fine details of each leaf. Autumn is the best season to study leaf structures and color changes. This study allowed me to ask very curiously questions, such as why the color changes of each leaf are different and how the cooler temperatures affect this change. After completing each drawing, I found myself returning to add more detail. IMG_1333
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 32
      donnacnh
      I am enjoying comparison studies, I have been focusing on patterns and got out my hand lens recently for closer looks.  I found that acorns have more texture to them than is obvious to the naked eye and that pine cones are really hard to draw.EA542C86-9799-4594-B1DA-AD07AF4FF5D8
    • Gayle
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      GPerrine
      I think making the comparisons helped me pay more attention to the details. Writing and recording numerical data provide information I am unable to successfully show in my drawings. As my drawing skills improve, I will probably incorporate less writing and data.   IMG_0656
    • Constance
      Participant
      Chirps: 26
      constancekel
      IMG_20321) I compared two plants on my deck. I am a beginner at sketching and it took me a lot of time. I enjoyed it so much but this did make me wonder how I can adapt my work for going out in the field--my goal for my nature journal. I know that practice will help me work more efficiently, but are there other things I can do to capture important points about the subjects in a shorter time period? Birds are not going to sit still for me. I continue to be surprised by just how much more I observe when I draw. Drawing also gives me more time to think about questions I have. I have a biology background, so I think my observational skills are quite good. However, this study showed me just how much more I can grow in this regard. 2)This question of balance is key for me. When I finished drawing, I first thought I was done until I realized I had done no writing! Quantitative data is important, but asking questions led me to go back and do even more observations. I have an additional page or writing I didn't upload. In the earlier video on journal styles, one person had lots of boxes on her pages. I think this might be useful for me to use this more to force me to have a box for quantitative data, one for qualitative observations, one for questions , etc.
      • Susan
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        susangreta
        These are beautifully rendered. The shading using stippling works really well and you captured the dimensionality and depth in the individual plants. Congrats!
      • Constance
        Participant
        Chirps: 26
        constancekel

        @Susan Thanks so much for the kind words!

    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 32
      donnacnh
      Another rainy day comparison.  I used a hand lens to look closely at the two plants. 84348607-7F8C-4C86-BB41-EFCFF6C4951A
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      PatriciaKramer
      WIN_20191101_13_00_51_ProToday was way to smokey to go outside but I had these pine cones as part of an indoor arrangement.  Watching our instructor draw her comparisons really helped me.  I have very little experience and learned a lot from watching her.
    • Christy
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      ChristyMorrow
      I have been putting this off because of rain and then we had a hard freeze last night so there went the flowers.  So I chose the berries.  This assignment is great because it is really helping me to be more observant.  I'm having fun with these challanges. Hnkh1ZCuQM6cYtPpYLuyLA_thumb_6c6c
    • Mary Jo
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      mp2162
      IMG_6158
    • Seth
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      sfb28806
      Comparison 1.) I really enjoyed this study.  These feathers have been on my mantle for six months, but I truly saw them for the first time tonight.  I learned that, although they have the same basic pattern elements, there are big differences in coloration, speckling, and contrast. 2.) I would like to try to add more numerical data because I have never thought to do it before.  It would make it more scientific.  I have only ever noted the presence of birds I hear while journaling so that I can imagine the atmosphere after the fact.  It would be interesting to count plants, flowers, insects etc as well.
    • Jean
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      jean skolnik
      I enjoyed this activity. I selected two specimens of Holly from my garden. It was interesting to examine the many differences between the plants. The Winterberry was new to my garden so a fairly immature plant while the English Holly is very large and over 25 years old. I thought the difference in the leaves were especially interesting. I took some additional time to read about both species. I learned a bit about how to distinguish English Holly from native American Holly.IMG_2263
    • Valerie P Stevens
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      valeriepstevens
      mushrooms
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 32
      donnacnh
      Comparison study of two different maple leaves, with shadow and palette practice.  The sugar maple is not quite as dark as I expected, but the watercolors are very new for me.  Not much painting experience or even detailed drawing prior to this course. image
      • Charlene
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        cbrusso
        I love that you're experimenting with color. It not only adds more data about the leaves you're comparing, it also really brings the images to life, as if you've invited the readers along on your outing.  I have a watercolor set but I still haven't dipped a brush into it. Seeing your work is really making me want to try adding color to my descriptions. Thanks!
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 32
      donnacnh
      Autumn garden makes for some good comparison of plants at the end of season. image
    • sondra
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      sondralynne
      Colorful leave are falling everywhere and I wondered what determines their colors. I drew an Northern Red Oak leaf which is reddish and a yellow Norway Maple for comparison. Checking on Wikipedia I found there are 2 pigments present after their the chlorophyll has left the leaves because of dropping temperatures and less sunlight. Carotenoids which are already present in the leaf come through as yellow, orange and brown. Anthrocyanins present as reds and purples. Thank you Wikipedia.573D0CEC-E469-4FF8-A40B-BCB1C3432214
    • Lucia
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      wolflu
      I started with the drawings and then added descriptions of the subjects.  I’d like to also use the journal to remember a walk or a special time with family. The comparison study is informative and enjoyable. My second comparison of two very similar flowers, the vinca  and impatiens was rewarding.
    • Lucia
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      wolflu
      imageimage
    • Doris
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      peacefuldb
      Was able to finally go outside and devote some time to this. I was surprised at the differences in the 2 leaves.  I fear my drawings do not reflect that but perhaps in time...I am attempting photography and this course 745EE326-2D4C-46D3-B3B5-978912BE90AB_1_201_awill help me see the small details I have overlooked so far. I think I need to work on ordering the writing so it makes sense when you go back to review. As others have said, writing with a pencil is taking me back...old school!
      • Constance
        Participant
        Chirps: 26
        constancekel
        I am really taken by your close observations on these two seemingly simple objects. Your sketches really give me the "feel" of these two leaves and how different they are.  Your observations are so good and so diverse--exposure to sunlight, leaf and bark texture, leaf margins, vein pattern. This made me realize that I should have narrowed my scope and made better observations on a smaller scale.
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      KST113
      Simple versus Complex. I challenged myself by choosing a rather complex subject to draw, but liked the comparison of two different kinds of seed carriers, a pine cone containing  multiple seeds and a hickory nut containing only one seed. I wondered why the pine tree produces so many seeds and the hickory relatively few in comparison. I included the leaves because the hickory has a more complex leaf as compared to the pine. IMG_1193
      • Laurie
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        BartelsBirders
        Karen, your rendering of the pine cone has me smiling, as it seems to perfectly encapsulate not only the object itself but also the smells and evocation of this time of year. Lovely! Cheers, Laurie
      • Claire
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Cwknapp5440
        This is so effective and well drawn.
    • Kevin
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      IthacaKev
      img20191024_10400468
      • Lisa
        Participant
        Chirps: 13
        Lucylocket
        I would have never thought to try to draw individual feathers! I am a bird lover so your drawing (as well as the one who did feathers above this post) have inspired me to try some. I don't have anything as exciting as a road runner feather (how lucky to have that) but I guess I could start with the many crow feathers and pigeon feathers I find. Great idea!
    • Erin
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Erin Eliza
      I decided to work with elements that I found interesting in the lesson.  1) Demo is drawn so fast - I don't trust my skill level so I tend to draw slowly.  2) The details are suggested but not always drawn in detail.   3) ask and muse about answers - I tend to figure someone already has the answer so if I ask, why not look it up... but it could be kind of fun to muse first.   I sat in our front yard a bit away from the trees and tried a rough and quick comparison. Nothing fancy, but I was pleasantly surprised at how curious I became about the tree growth and trying to remember anything I know about leaf types (not much) so it could help to do a little research to remember complex and compound vs other leaf types.). QuickCompare
    • Kieki
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      kiekidup
      1. This is the first time I did a comparison study and I found it to be really helpful.  It helped me to observe the differences and similarities and guided some of my observations.  I feel that it helped me study to object in more depth, and will help to grow my observation skills. 2.  I think this is helpful to from time to time include all this information in my journal.  It will help later to identify certain objects and most definitely expand my knowledge of the variety of objects found in nature all around me.
    • Kieki
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      kiekidup
      image
    • Bill
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      wbeers
      IMG_1518I It rained most of today so I compared these two oak leaves working inside. One new thing I learned is  that not only each lobe had a vessel, but each sub-lobe had one as well.  I wondered if the branched "veins" only carried sugars away from the leaf or if nutrients also flow back into the leaf.  It seems there are these types of oak species (rounded or pointed lobes), and oaks with no lobes.  The leaves reminded me of my own hand, especially the back. I felt that I need to draw hundreds of leaves before I'll begin to appreciate the structure of leaves, and that's just the leaf!  The whole tree.  It's an endless journey. The other student drawings are so interesting!
      • Claire
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Cwknapp5440
        I'm hoping to be able to simplify my drawing and subject matter like you have done with your comparison study of these two leaves. They are great drawings and look good on your page.
    • Joannie
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      galjag
      Cornell class-comparison study
    • Tom
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      ebirdtgill
      Inspired by the "lecture" and all the wonderful shared comments and pages by fellow students, I still gave it a few days before doing the exercise. I did several hikes the past week and came to realize that even a short walk in my city has me passing dozens of different types of trees and I'm woefully unable to identify more than a few very obvious specimens.  Long intro to: I chose trees.  Two oaks which are growing across the street from me and are beginning their fall color transition. I never knew their names until today, and the comparison of the leaves, trunk and fruit (nuts) upped my appreciation for the Gift of Nature so close to my very small corner lot backyard.  Taking the time to study the leaves, make the comparisons, then draw them and list observations has me feeling like I "got to know my neighbors."  A walk around the block was stimulating and challenging.  I located one tree ID book I had, and ordered another one right away.  Looking forward to the process of learning to ID trees using the methods presented in this course.  Hurrah! Tree ID leaf compare
      • Tom
        Participant
        Chirps: 20
        ebirdtgill
        I keep going back to look at others' work when new entries are posted...came across mine again, and since I received the book on trees (National Wildlife Federation's Field Guide to Trees of North America) I learned I had incorrectly ID'd the oak on the left. It is "just" a White Oak, discerned by comparing the leaves to the Swamp Oak in the book. Since we weren't in a swamp, that should have been another clue!
    • William
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      mickelboro
      I have lived in the same house since 1976 and watched the pines and the oaks grow in the front yard.  Many times we have had to cut low hanging branches off and two years ago had to hire a company to have a major tree trimming for all the trees in the front yard.  I have watched these trees grow and change over the years,DSC_9455 so I picked to do a comparison of the bark in the trunk area of a pine and oak .
    • Mike
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Buffalo72
      Comparison Study The weather has been too wet to go outside, so I collected these two seed-heads, and brought them inside. My handwriting doesn't make it easy... I suppose I need to remember how to print.
    • Sandy
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      SRMelton
      IMG_2605
      • Claire
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Cwknapp5440
        I love the way you included all aspects of each tree but didn't feel you had to draw the entire tree. I have a lot to learn.
    • Monika
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      monikawood
      The comparison study helped me to look more closely and to use senses such as touch and smell. I'm still not sure how to balance drawing, writing, and numerical data. Hopefully I will  develop a style as a keep practicing. I still get "stuck" when drawing and it's hard to know how to imrove my drawings that are very sketchy. It was pitch dark this morning when I had time to journal, so I just went outside and brought in a couple of branches from trees in my yard. I agree it would be better to journal outside. IMG_2762
      • Constance
        Participant
        Chirps: 26
        constancekel
        I really like how you zoomed in on your subjects; there 's so much to learn, even from a single yew needle! Your sketch really gives me a feel for how different the two types of needles are in texture. Your observations are great--I always forget to make comments on scent.  Thank you for this!
    • Peggy
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      pegs-birder
      F5968784-D4D1-44B6-8779-3348DDB8832DMy plan when I went out this morning was to go to an area where I normally see a lot of songbirds and to compare the behavior of two species.  Unfortunately just as I sat down, it got very windy and the birds all went wherever they go to get out of the wind. While sitting there I noticed a stand of three Aspen trees but one of the trees looked very different than the other two. Aspens usually do better at higher altitudes so it wasn’t surprising that one of them was diseased.
    • Aimee
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      aimee_lusty
      IMG_5037 I did this exercise indoors because the weather was very bad today, I think my observation would have benefitted from being outdoors and also comparing leaves, branch and bark of the two trees. Now looking at other submissions I'd like to include scale measurements in upcoming drawings as well.
    • Elizabeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      Ek2012
      Not a great time to be drawing outdoors, so I collected two flowers from my garden and did my comparison inside where it was dry and warm.  I know the Hummingbirds and Bumblebees enjoy the red flower. Not 100% sure about the white one.  I’ll have to make note next spring in my nature journal. AEE90E5D-F83A-4FA8-BEB3-DC83F11BCC2E
      • Susan
        Participant
        Chirps: 13
        Sustra
        I love your printing and how you've placed things on the pages. Will need to work on that since I don't have a decision about how I'll journal and draw.
      • Laurie
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        BartelsBirders
        Hi Elizabeth, your journal page resonates! I appreciate the layout you used, wrapping your beautiful printing around the images, and I can sense the water in the vase. Your use of shading, darker and lighter lines, and mark making reminds me to not be shy in the pressure I apply to the pencil. Thank you for sharing your page. Cheers, Laurie
      • Claire
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        Cwknapp5440
        Your page is so beautiful it could be printed in a botany book. I'm jealous.
    • Montecito
      Participant
      Chirps: 22
      favelasco
      I enjoyed a lot this exercise because observing better each plant you find many different features in each specimen that you did not notice before. After drawing the first specimen, I could find more features in the second one and started finding new ones in the first one too. Seeing things in one plant, makes you realize that the other does not have it. I forgot to measure my specimens, but in order to write the measurements, we can start with measures and then with characteristics and after that drawing. After drawing we can notice more new characteristics we found during the drawing process. .IMG_4576
    • Christina
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      Chris2019
      IMG_6195 (it WAS sunny earlier today! By the time I finished work, and cooking dinner, it was dark, so I used the acorn and Halesia seed I had collected a few weeks ago. The side by side comparison appeals to me, and urged me on to research the trees further. Didn't realized that Halesia seeds aren't a food source for wildlife, but did know that acorns are an important food source for turkeys and deer. Have found no explanation for the wings of the Halesia's seed pods, made a note of my question for further research.
    • Kati
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      KatiJackson
      i had trouble with this at first, but i'm so glad i did it. I have both Goldenrod and Mugwort in the same part of my yard. when the goldenrod is done blooming, it can be very hard to tell them apart.  but taking time to note the small details, helped me see the differences. Surprisingly, i also noticed a lot of similarities, especially in the flower buds. they have very similar height, and spacing where they grow, and very similar colors. Oh and the smell of mugwort. so lovely! Although my first focus was on drawing and painting in this course, i'm starting to really like taking notes. I hardly ever write with a pencil anymore, it's tough, but good to keep the skill alive! (i say as I type).. :) IMG_8735
    • holly
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      hollysnuts
      A comparison study is a very interesting way to manage and maintain my small garden properties. As October settles in central MA the plants and trees in my West Garden [almost all perennials] have gone to seed. Today I attempted to use Fuller's idea to contrast the one plant of Silvermound Wormwood I purchased and planted and the enormous quantity of 'Hens & Chicks' I received from a favorite aunt. They both seem to be spreading plants [I know the Hens & Chicks is]. I could see green, healthy looking portion of the Wormwood & on it's strongest stems there appeared to be bits of smaller , green. Before graying the leave, still feathery, turn yellow and start to curl. Hens & Chicks are VERY sturdy. The most tender of leaves remain green. The outer leaves are clearly seed hulls that release to open up the green within. I never saw it bloom, except except in my own garden. I have to look up whether a plant can be biennial. One can clearly see the flower stems all gray,brown then topple and reproduce spread & grow. Both plants have mounding ways of growing and make them pretty at the garden's edge. It's really difficult sketching as a left handed artisan. I use my eraser [and thankfully] keep a draftsman's brush in my basket. Without a doubt recording date, # of day and numerical data would help spark visions and make memories clearer Reply         t
    • Cheryl
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      BirderCheryl
      I went ALL the way to my front courtyard to compare two orange flowers: lantana and marigolds. It was interesting to really look at the structure of their flowers, buds, and leaves. I had to try a Venn diagram to compare and contrast - I was surprised that I needed more in the "both have" central area than the outer areas, but I ran out of room in both sections and went to making notes next to the sketches. I had never noticed the pattern on the lantana of growing two flowers for each pair of leaves or that the marigold leaves were four or five matched pairs with a larger central leaf at the top. I found the flower structure on the lantana to be especially interesting. I enjoyed the activity and will do it again!Comparison - 10-14-19
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Smyrna38
      61CCAE34-96FA-4740-8F21-9140C02AF359 I compared these 3 discovered feathers. I know the Blue Jay and Downy Woodpecker, and not the middle, which was a very uniform gray with a white edge. It was about the same size as the jay, but more slender. The uniformity of color has me confused, Mockingbirds and Mourning Doves have patterns. This comparison study helped me to focus on feather length and detail. Another few questions I have is why do some birds appear to have more ‘fluff’ at the attachment end than others. Is the fluff related to their ability to keep warm in winter, thus not having to migrate?
      • Cheryl
        Participant
        Chirps: 12
        BirderCheryl
        Great idea for a subject! I'll try it!
      • sondra
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        sondralynne
        Very nice drawing! I found this great website for feather identification called the feather atlas,  I’ve used it several times.   fws.gov
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 32
      donnacnh
      923CF540-E778-4EFB-8690-686FE7BCAF16My comparative study is of a zinnia and another purple flower in my garden.  The zinnias died back in the frost last weekend and the purple flower that I waited all summer to see blossom, popped into bloom with the frost. I am now wondering what pollinates this flower and how it propagates itself, the flowers are in clusters at the top of the stem whereas the zinnia has a single flower at the end of the stem. The stink bugs and Asian lady beetles were buzzing us the whole time we were out drawing...ahhh... Autum in New Hampshire,  the foliage is awesome this year.
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Sustra
      Noticing the variety of tubular flowers that still attract all sizes of birds and insects. Two I've noted in my journal are a Tropical Mandeville with large tubular flowers and Blue Salvia that have tall stalks with clusters of smaller tubular flowers. I would have expected Hummingbirds to be more attracted to the larger flower, but there may be a difference in the quality, quantity or accessibility of the nectar since birds, bees and butterflies are all attracted to the Salvia more consistently. Flowers are smaller, but many more of them and they bloom over a long period from beginning of summer through early freezes. As soon as the temp warmed up even slightly today the bees and Painted Lady butterflies were back. Painted Ladies used to drive each other, and bees/hummingbirds off the plant, but now they are cooperating and just working their own corners of the plant. Will make a chart of the flowering plants in my yard to record what blooms attracted which wildlife.SAM_1451
      • Janice
        Participant
        Chirps: 9
        janlan
        Your drawings are lovely. What tools do you use for the color? Pencils? Markers? Watercolors? Thank you.
      • Susan
        Participant
        Chirps: 13
        Sustra

        @Janice Thank you for the kind words. I used both watercolor pencil and the larger areas were the Koi 24 color travel set I'd gotten from Amazon. I haven't done much with watercolor pencil so this is a learning experience and really want to work on getting shading on the leaves. Many shades of green, but I'd read about using Gouache for lighter highlights so will try it.

    • laurel
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      LaurelSharp
      BDED66C8-8B07-465E-8F6D-AFA5F580194AI couldn’t find 2 lovely flowers, so I used 2 trees that were side by side—an oak and a cottonwood. It was almost like they were living in two different forests—the cottonwood was very flexible, blowing in the wind, with many of its leaves blown off. The oak barely moved in the wind, and still had most of its leaves. I found it challenging to suggest the texture of the two different trees without drawing individual leaves. I like having the inset single leaves; they make each of the trees more present to me. The structure of the trees really varied. The oak had sturdy branches that reached up, and was dense with leaves. The cottonwood had fewer, more fluttery leaves, very responsive to the wind. Its branches drooped and swayed. I thought its wood is probably softer than the oak’s.
    • Barbara T.
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      btyczkowski
      seashell comparison, 10-13-2019
    • Jean
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Jean_Smith
      9D3599EE-D74D-4817-BD92-1E742907BCA4I decided to continue with my Franklinia. I had real trouble with the water drops on white flowers and and shading the flowers and leaves. I learned that I need a lot of time. I forgot to take a ruler with me to show scale.
    • Ellen
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Canucky
      I went to a local wetland park, Corktown Common. I walked around the wetland and found a brown rabbit eating grass in the sunshine. I managed a quick sketch of the bunny before they were scared by skateboarders.  I continued to the wetland area and did a comparison of three plants which all had seeds that blow away. The Common Milkweed, A Bulrush and Sweet Joe-Pye. As it is fall, the seeds were blowing, the leaves were no longer bright green and the signs of decay were all around. I really enjoyed doing this and was surprised by how many people stopped and asked questions of me about my drawing and the park. IMG_20191012_174405
    • Mary-Louise
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Snowy Bluebird
      This one was hard.  I went into my back yard and had a hard time finding something to compare.  A lot of the plants are fading and going to seed.  I chose two small wild flowers.  The were very similar and I think that is what made  it.  I was frustrated toward the end. \challenging.  IMG_1634
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