• Steve
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      I have a lot to learn, including how to manipulate this program and insert my thoughts and drawings. Taking the time to really observe, count, see the various shapes and colors, all very important and a real challenge.
    • Steve
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Comparison of two different things
    • Natalie
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      image
    • Robin
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      I was doing a Sit Spot at my local lake when I noticed that the wild grapes were dangling right next to the ripe blackberries and I thought that would be a fun pair of things to compare. I enjoyed this exercise and found that the more things I found to compare, the more things I found to compare. IMG_3346
    • Jacqueline
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      This comparison lesson was helpful in focusing and noticing details.  I compared two different pepper plants.  The obvious differences were how they grew (one up, one down), size (one very small, one much larger).  Some similarities were leaves (both smooth), shape (both elongated oval; however different sizes).  Some less obvious details were the flower on the red pepper plant. At first I didn’t even see the tiny flower as it was covered by a leaf.  With a closer look at the flower, I noticed one taller white carpel in the center surrounded by 5 green stamen. Also how the leaves, although same shape, attached differently to the plant.3228D642-CD47-4451-977A-54DA384F3981
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      I compared the pine tree and the arborvitae tree in my backyard.  These evergreens are similar having seed pods/cones, drop their leaves and have scented leaves when rubbed.  They supply food for animals and parts of the trees are used to benefit people.  Differences are their leaves one pokey and pointy and the other rounded and flat.  The bark on the pine tree is rough and bumpy and the arborvitae is smoother with vertical lines.  I learned a lot about each tree just my making a comparison.A66EFD24-84F1-4A07-958B-9A0DAF9908DF
    • V L
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      1. I did a comparison study on 2 different firebushes I have in my yard.  One had yellow flowers and one had red flowers, but I've noticed before there are differences in the 2 bushes.  I was very surprised to observe that the red blooming firebush had 3 leaves around the stem and the yellow blooming one had 4 leaves.  Then I had to do more research to be sure they actually were the same kind of plant. 2. I am still better at writing than drawing, but enjoyed the drawing experience.  Adding numbers made a big difference in my observations. Hamelia Comparison
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      IComparison -anthuriumI  compared  Comparison - pelargoniumI compared two tropical houseplants the both have exaggerated forms - the anthurium (extremely long, pointed leaves, waxy flowers with prominent spathes) and the pelargonium (tough, ruffled leaves, hairy stems). In my house they share a site and growing conditions. But their origins differ widely (South Africa and South America). I wondered what purpose these characteristics may have had in their native habitats, and whether they still serve any purpose in their new habitats.
    • Kelly
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      My comparison study was done between two plants that have very different overall structure but similar looking flowers. I found myself noticing several distinct features of each species through drawing. Representing the smaller detailed parts of the plant was easier for me but I struggled with representing the overall shape of the plants. I'm going to find a small ruler and tape it to the inside of my nature journal so I have it in the future. For this study the measurements were approximations. The overall balance of drawing, writing, and data I was happy with but I'd like to find a way to better separate out the parts of the comparison.PXL_20210730_184826917
    • Catherine
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      I walked to a local park, where there was a section of native plant species. I was attracted to the wildly blooming flowers on two neighboring plants and used iNaturalist to try to identify them. Interestingly, iNaturalist indicated they were both in the oenothera family, even though they looked incredibly different. As I observed and sketched, I found myself looking for the similarities amidst the differences, to see how these two plants could be related, and thanks to doing direct comparisons - looking at the same features on each of the plants - I was able to see the subtle similarities. I found that comparison encouraged a balance of sketching, writing, and numerical data, simply because I was taking care to be precise. I'm not sure I used the space on the page well, and might wish to use boxes to separate the various perspectives I try in future observations. Oenothera
    • Marc
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      I found that with comparative drawing each time I looked for a further detail when switching back and forth more details popped out. It’s seemed as I was going back and forth I was in a trance and very into the moment. I seemed to find my style here to with my drawings and information I presented. I want to find a way to sharpen the transition of info to picture maybe a box? I really enjoyed this assignment and am looking forward to getting out there and doing more. I think my next one I want to make a separate information column just for measurements. We will see! I feel I am definitely getting my confidence at this point!22A14763-1766-4B02-A629-A2C0689BC9036CCE62E9-2F28-421F-9ED2-524B5808DB1691AD0BE1-EE10-4010-BEE4-07AA72B6CEA3
    • Janet
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I chose to compare two flowering plants in my backyard garden, a penstemon and a larkspur. In the process I learned a lot about the structure of both plants including their leaves, stems, and flowers. I also thought about the organisms that pollinated both plants and realized they were mostly the same for both plants. I'm finding I need to block out the drawing spaces first and then add the writing and numerical data. If not I tend to fill all the space with writing details.IMG_0694
      • Arleene
        Participant
        Chirps: 20
        Yes I found the same thing happened to me so I blocked the writing as well. The facts and observations are so interesting to read though. I enjoyed your comparison study page!
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 74
      I chose to perform a comparison study of several echinoderms: a round sand dollar, an arrowhead sand dollar, a sea biscuit and sea urchin. All the organisms exhibit pentaradial symmetry. The comparisons help to focus on details. I had wanted to know what purpose the lunules served with the sand dollars and explore the observation of the sea urchin with the hats (shells) on top of its spines. I had trouble with image file sizeIMG_20210711_192624 (1)
      • Kathleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 74
        I left the date off of my drawing: July 11, 2021 but it was a combination of several observations. The sea urchin was observed several months ago.
      • Arleene
        Participant
        Chirps: 20

        @Kathleen Oh nice drawing. Coming from the prairies in Canada I rarely see anything that comes from the ocean.

    • Anna
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      EF4C7D33-FC11-45C0-94CC-D5B9F8E4ED1DI am trying to figure out what to add to my pages for facts.  I think maybe some measurements, or what is in the environment.
    • Jill
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      unnamed
    • Gerda
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      720AC671-16C0-483E-BEE4-12E73758AC02_1_105_c I hiked in the Hopkins Demonstration Forest in Beavercreek Oregon. The terrain is steep, beautiful hiking path with many birdsongs. This is a managed forest by the county on land donated by a family. Last winter we had a tremendous ice storm that damaged many trees, so many that just the trails have been cleared, the forest is still damaged and it will take years to get it back to the way it was. I had come here in the past with the mycological society to learn about mushrooms. I sat on a stump, closed my eyes, listened and was amazed how soothing this little bit of meditation was. The flowers were not as plentiful and varied as other parts of the Cascade mountains, but this was peaceful on a holiday weekend.            
    • Carolyn
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      img277 editedimg278 edited
    • Claire
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      IMG_3127 (3)
    • Carolyn
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      I visited a local garden, found a quiet spot to sit, and compared two nearby plants - a dawn redwood tree and an overgrown boxwood shrub.  I found that the comparison sparked more questions, encouraging me to look up more information.  Not having a scientific background, I find it difficult to understand the natural functions of what I'm observing, but the process is encouraging me to learn more. IMG_6460 IMG_6461
    • Sara Alice
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I compared a wild grape vine leaf from my back yard with a sea grape leaf from my sister's yard. Sea grapes are trees and not grapes but their fruit grows in long clusters. They're used in similar ways - juice, jelly etc. The grapes have jagged leaves with loose clusters hiding under leaves. Sea grapes are oval with long visible clusters.  The leaves are much larger. In Fall the grape leaves are yellow, and sea grape leaves are orange or red with yellow veins. Both have a main vein that starts at the stem and goes to the other side of the leaf. I learned that there is a plant with leaves similar to wild grape that is toxic. Open the "grape" and if the seed is like a crecent moon, don't eat it. I think I could organize my data to see that it's a comparison by listing similar things side by side instead of randomly .  Like -  then scientific names,  then colors, then how they grow on the stem, then other observations etc. This was fun. I wanted to compare the tassel weed flowers in the yard, the neighbor's chickens, the trees blooming along the street.
    • Sara
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      comparison trees
    • Beth
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I don't have lots of experience drawing outdoors. So, it was little blinding to look at white paper while sitting in the sun.  first lesson - maybe a hat or find some shade. it helps to be able to see. lol.  Drew in my garden, a fuscia and ?? very different plants. IMG_0024
    • Ingrid
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      5943C137-1499-4BC0-88AC-EBCB22D8370A
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      This was a great exercise. I sketched a mayapple and liverwort plant. Each has very different leaf and flower structure, texture, and color. Except for the black flies harassing me, and the bird that pooped on my hand, this was lots of fun. I used my watercolor pencils for a little color.Comparison exercise
    • Barb
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
      Rain/Snow yesterday in Denver, but today when I went for my walk I saw some weeds in the open space along the walking trail.  So I brought a couple of pieces to the house and was able to determine what they were by contacting Larimer County Weed Service.  Then I drew them along with their names and descriptions textures.  I also found out one was non-invasive (Rabbitbrush) and Native American's had used as yellow dye and to make medicinal tea and chewing gum.  The other (Common Mullein) is invasive.  In spring/summer flowers and leaves are edible and can be used in salad or to make tea.  I have lived here 70 years and never even noticed the weeds before.  So fun experience.  IMG_2551