Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: July 10, 2021
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Replies Created: 6

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Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)
  • Nancy
    Participant
    Pandion60
    Activity 1: Visited a nearby park in a wetlands area. Many songbirds were present in the grassy area with trees set far back from the water including American Robins, Black-and-white Warbler, Northern Flicker, Golden-crowned Kinglet. These birds were not seen in the tidal mudflat area where other bird species were present including Mallards, Northern Shovelers, a Little Blue Heron, Great Egrets, Great Blue Heron and Herring Gulls. Activity 2: Sevenoaks must have a large pond/waterbody that is frequented by the many geese, swans, various duck species and all the shorebirds listed. There must also be a nearby field and brush area where the ring-necked pheasant lives. There are also songbirds here so there must be trees/forest in the area. At Down House I noticed there are no shorebirds such as ducks and geese, so I assume there is no water body in the area of this hotspot. There are predominantly  songbirds here, so I assume there are trees/a forest to provide their habitats. And perhaps there are fields and open areas that attract raptors such as the Common Buzzard and Eurasian Kestrel.
  • Nancy
    Participant
    Pandion60
    Activity 1: Saw a house sparrow enjoying a bath in a puddle on our pool cover. Bird looked very large and puffy while fluffing its feathers and maneuvering in the water to wash itself. It would dip part of its body in the water then shake and puff the feathers, and used its head to preen, with chirps here and there. This all happened repeatedly over the course of about 2 minutes. Then the bird flew to the top of the nearby fence post. I noticed how small and trim the bird looked sitting on the fence post compared to when it was fluffing and bathing. What fun to watch this! Prior to my newfound interest in birds I would not have paid much attention to what birds were doing. So much to see. A whole new world has opened up! Activity 2: Watched the Cornell Sapsucker Woods Feeder Cam. The European Starlings tend to bully other birds out of their spots on the platform, even if there’s plenty of room for everyone. Mourning Doves tend to coexist with other birds on the platform and move out of the way of other birds. Hairy woodpecker pecks at the hanging feeder and stays awhile, then leaves and comes back. Red-breasted Nuthatch is skittish- flies to a hanging feeder, grabs seed and quickly flies away. Blue Jay flies to the hanging feeder with peanuts, grabs a whole peanut and flies away with it. Activity 3:  Listened to birds outside in my backyard. Dozens of European Starlings perched in 2 trees calling to each other. Heard more than one Blue Jay in a tree calling to others. Heard a Mourning Dove. Also heard chirps, probably a House Sparrow.
  • Nancy
    Participant
    Pandion60
    Activity 1: Northern Cardinal doesn’t migrate that much throughout the year-stays primarily in the U.S. and a few areas in Mexico year round. Blackburnian Warbler travels great distances- wintering primarily in South America and parts of Central America, and migrating to northern U.S. and Canada for breeding season. Scarlet Tanager winters in South America and migrates to central and eastern U.S. and parts of Canada during breeding season. Western Tanager winters along the coasts of Central America and Mexico and migrates to western U.S. and Canada during breeding season. Ruby-throated Hummingbird winters in Mexico and Central America and migrates to central and eastern U.S. and parts of Canada during breeding season-very spread out in those areas. Rufous Hummingbird winters in Mexico and migrates to coastal areas of western U.S. and Canada for spring, then spreads out southward into western U.S. in summer- perhaps following the food/flower supply. Yellow-bellied flycatcher winters in southern Mexico and Central America, and migrates to far northern portions of western, central and eastern Canada as well as New England. Sandhill Crane breaks up into different groups that winter in southern U.S., Mexico, and Florida; they summer in various parts of northern Canada and the U.S.-some birds remain in Florida all year round. Activity 2:  Birds that do not winter in my area that I have seen: Snowy Egret, Osprey, and Great Blue Heron. Birds that are found year-round in my area that I have seen: Peregrine Falcon, American Robin and Northern Cardinal. Activity 3: American Goldfinch in summer is bright yellow with black wings and tail and beak is bright orange; in winter their yellow is muted and blended with beige-their beaks are brown/black. Common Loons in summer have strikingly beautiful white and black stripes and checker pattern on neck and body,  black head/hood with a teal band around the neck, black beak; in winter the dorsal side of bird is a muted brown/black and the underside from beak to tail is white, whitish beak with black blended in part of it. Activity 4: Favorite birding spot is DeKorte Park wetlands. Expect to see now in September but won’t see them in March: Laughing Gull, Semipalmated Sandpiper, Osprey, Snowy Egret, Spotted Sandpiper.
  • Nancy
    Participant
    Pandion60
    Activity 1: Visited wetlands park area nearby. Tide was low. Saw very large Herring Gull pull up a stranded fish from the mudflat- he had difficultly pulling the fish out and then flew away. Saw many groups of Semipalmated Sandpipers- they flew together in synchronized form around the mudflat before landing together in a safe spot on an island- then they began walking around pecking at the mudflat edge foraging for food. Saw many beautiful Great Egrets foraging solo and one Great Blue Heron walking slowly and occasionally standing still before capturing prey from the mudflat. Caught a glimpse only of beautiful black wings with white bars on the dorsal side flying into the marsh trees; later identified this as a Northern Mockingbird. Activity 2:  Likely birds in my area today include American Goldfinch, Ring-billed Gull, Barn Swallow, Hairy Woodpecker, Indigo Bunting. Activity 3: Five birds that pass through my area include Monk Parakeet, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, Brant, Yellow-crowned Night Heron, Green-winged Teal.
  • Nancy
    Participant
    Pandion60
    Activity 1: House Sparrow: small, round body and round head with hardly any visible neck, small but sturdy beak, medium length tail. Blue Jay: medium-sized oval-shaped body, longer but thinner beak than sparrow, visible crest on head, has a short neck. Activity 2: Northern Mockingbird: Gray/brown medium thin body, roundish head, beige under body/belly, thin medium-sized black beak, dorsal side of wings are black with wide white stripes/bars, long tail.  Song Sparrow: small round brown body with black streaks, black bib, small stout black beak, whitish underbelly, round head with white cheeks and gray crown, medium length tail. Red-winged Blackbird: sleek black body and head, pointy black beak, black wings with bright red epaulettes where yellow lower edges are lined with yellow, fan-like black tail. Activity 3: European Starling eating at feeder stays in one place picking up one large seed at a time in its beak, chews and swallows it before picking up another seed; leaves feeder carrying one seed in its beak. Northern Cardinal hangs on the feeder with small seeds, pecks at it then moves to the feeder with large seeds after the starling leaves, picks up one large seed and flies away.  Pileated Woodpecker hangs on the side of bird feeder consistently pecking deep into the feeder for seed, flies away, then comes back and repeats the same pecking behavior. Activity 4: Northern Cardinal: Large oval-shaped red body with long red tail with black blended in, pointy red tuft/crest on red head, head has mask around thick short orange beak, black beard, black blended into the wings, seen in my backyard sitting on a fence post.
  • Nancy
    Participant
    Pandion60
    Activity 1:  Favorites on Bird Wall:  Atlantic Puffins because they are so cute & Przevalski's Rosefinch because of the beautiful plumage color. Activity 2: European Starling (saw in my neighborhood). Semipalmated Sandpiper & Great Egret (saw both in DeKorte Park, Lyndhurst, NJ). Activity 3: House Sparrows because of their persistence in building a nest in the eaves of our house this year, and for successfully raising their young, even though they were quite noisy neighbors throughout the process! They are gone now but won't be forgotten.
Viewing 6 posts - 1 through 6 (of 6 total)