Viewing 56 reply threads
    • Bird Academy
      Bird Academy
      Bird_Academy
      1. Which of the new watercolor techniques have you tried? What have you discovered using them? Any tips or experiences you’d like to share? 2. Thinking of your own journaling projects, how might you incorporate any of the new watercolor techniques in this topic to achieve your goals?
      You must be enrolled in the course to reply to this topic.
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      LindaWorden
      Watercolor lesson This is what I did to try out the different techniques.  Very difficult to regulate the amount of water on the brush.  Took a while to get the hang of it.  Still need practice but feel a little better about it
    • Beverly
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      BeverlyEvans
      <p style="text-align: left;">I have used acrylics to paint birds but have never used water color.  I found water color much more difficult.  I tend to over paint trying to get everything perfect and therefore the paper got beaded.  I could not get a bright yellow.  I tried adding white but it just lightened the yellow.  Does anyone have any ideas for me.  I used dry on wet for the bird along with some dry on dry trying to get a feather effect.  I used wet on wet for the back ground.  Here I had to keep mixing the colors because I would run out of paint and could not get the same color again.  I will keep practicing.  I love to paint.Scan_0006</p>
    • Isabel
      Participant
      Chirps: 30
      IsabelTroyo
      Ejercicio 2 Momoto coroniazulI used the wet on dry technique on the bird and many paint layers.  I tried the  wet on wet technique on the sky and grass but it is very difficult.
      • amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        amykarst
        I find the end effect very beautiful!
    • diana
      Participant
      Chirps: 49
      ittybittyart
      Used wet on dry on the Jay 2B752738-57A2-4013-B43D-972E95CAD48Band then wet on wet with the golden light behind.   Also I layered many various colors in the feathers, especially back of neck area.
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      patofvta
      I tried all three techniques.  I was interested in how far I could push the brush and paper with these techniques.  I did three small painting using only one technique at a time.  Wet on wet is very loose, can be a little out of control, and I had to let the paper dry between areas when I did not want the paint to blend.  Also found that if I did a large painting the paper buckled a bit.  Wet on dry was the easiest way to paint with the sketch book and the nylon brushes.  I personally love dry brush but found it difficult because the amount of water on the brush or wet paint on the picture resulted in a combo.  Next I decided to use all three on one painting.  Had a false start as the watercolor paper was hard to get wet enough with the nylon brushes, it began to form little particles of loose paper from rubbing the surface.  I then started over using 140 lb. paper and was afraid I would ruin the nylon brushes so I switched to real watercolor brushes to complete the same picture.  My conclusion is to use the nylon brushes in the field for quick sketches and perhaps when creating a journal page.  This is an excellent match of all the tools.  However, if I want to create artwork to frame in a larger format, I will stick to the heavy paper and natural hair brushes.  I really like the palette and the transparency of these colors.  Also it pleases me that it is possible to incorporate these techniques into the journal.  Since most of the paintings will be on a smaller scale, it is always good to know it is possible to use whatever is needed to complete the sketch. PatTech x 3Yosemite turnout
    • William
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      RaptorFalconFinch5
      I’m still getting used to water color in general: like not using too much water etc... However, this lesson was very cool.  I experimented with all three and attempted to use them in a picture. I found that the techniques fit in exactly how Liz said they would. Wet on dry for detail, wet on wet for large spaces, and dry brush for rough surfaces.  The proportions are way off, but I was not really focusing on them for this exercise. E39B990F-1B1D-446B-BEAD-47D283A4481CEDBBDE43-3652-4A9F-8746-463FC0BD00A1
    • Victoria
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      mvrestre
      I haven't finished my toucan yet, but I am using the different techniques in it. IMG_3157
      • William
        Participant
        Chirps: 12
        RaptorFalconFinch5
        Woah! That’s amazing!
      • amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        amykarst
        I can't believe you are using water color on this! 'How many layers have you done for this effect?
    • Kimmai
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      KimmaiNunnery
      IMG_4091IMG_4090IMG_4089 I have tried all 3 techniques. Dry brush as you can see on the abalone seem to come off to harsh or too bold. I found patience is key and waiting for the paint to dry before muddling up the painting. I love water and lightness of pigment  in creating skies.
      • diana
        Participant
        Chirps: 49
        ittybittyart
        Like how you played with the color and line I’m smaller images
    • Jill
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      JFeldkamp
      Wet on Wet, Wet on Dry The sky, water, and trees were first wet on wet with some wet brush on top once the paper had dried. The fence was from a dry brush. The grass was wet on dry.
    • Jill
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      JFeldkamp
      I had previously tried only wet on dry. I thought wet on wet was the most interesting. I need much more experience with each to learn what works and what doesn’t and how I could use them in my journals.
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      NancyChew
      I have tried all the watercolor techniques in the past but I rely heavily on wet on dry because of the control it gives. I have used wet on wet for sky or water and I have used dry on dry for grasses. In the watercolor sketch of the sky and water below I was practicing my color-mixing but also used wet on wet for the sky. I realize now that I used wet on wet for the water too. After I laid down the initial layer of the water I went back and added some more color (wet on wet) to show the ripples in the water. In the watercolor sketch of the trees below I used mostly the wet on dry technique. But I used wet on wet for the sky at the top and the water on the bottom. I used wet on dry for the sky near the trees because I didn't want the colors to run into each other. I'm going to go back to the same spot and try and improve my techniques. Here's what I plan to try next time: 1) use more water (wet on wet) in the water so that there is no white; 2) do a wash of the sky and then paint the trees and leaves over the wash; 3) practice some techniques to show the texture of the leaves of the deciduous trees better;  4) continue to use dry on dry for the tree trunks and branches but include more of them in the sketch and 5) spend more time to keep a record of the colors I mixed. My plan is to go to the same spot periodically to practice various techniques. Also, I'm going to go back in the various seasons to capture those differences. That will also allow me to practice the techniques I will need for the different seasons. Spruce Lane WaterHickory Trail Lookout
    • Avery
      Participant
      Chirps: 28
      boxturtlestudio
      Hi, I could not find a discussion section after Applying Watercolor to Paper, so I will put my painting here.  I used wet in wet for the landscape and some wet on dry. The maple seeds were done with glazing. The vultures used glazing, rocks, sand, dirt, wet on dry, water wet in wet. I recorded my observations in tiny words wrapped around the boxes. This project took several days. But I learned a lot.20200628_090458
    • اليازية
      Participant
      Chirps: 27
      Alyazia
      EA496C5F-701B-4A4E-949C-5C05281C5474 While working on this entry, I was convinced with one thing: watercolour needs patience. To tame my urgency within myself, I have decided to sketch three sketches at the same time and paint them using watercolours only. By doing so, I was able to create layers for each sketch. After finishing a layer, I moved to the other sketch and do the same. This give me enough time to let the layer dry and experiment as well. This is my first sketch: 464B7EB9-9750-48DB-8381-1BD4E2868B0A 1. The pencil used for the outline sketch was a B6 pencil, I decided to erase it and use a watercolour grey pencil instead. The reason to do so was to avoid erasing any pencil marks after colouring the piece. I was afraid that the eraser would ruin the colours and the sheet. 2. I sticked with the main colours: red, yellow, & blue as well as the white and black. For the base, I mixed the colours on the palette. used a dry on wet for all the sketches. 3. As soon as I felt that the base is dry , I added a bit of lining with the tip of the brush to give an overall colour scheme for the background. 4. After that I waited until it dried fully. Then I used the dry brush to add the details to the texture. 5. I decided to use the white paste with no water at all on a semi-wet brush tip to add a depth to the texture. 6. I tried to add some shades & tones wherever needed as a final step. This is the second piece: 0D58EFA5-D226-4514-9FC0-02550BEB9E4D I can’t upload the third one. I did one deadly mistake - I was lazy to mix and find the colour I want for the final detail lining - I ruin it with a blue instead of a dark/grey-purple. (I lost my patience at the last minute! >.> )
      • amy
        Participant
        Chirps: 17
        amykarst
        Nice job with the shells. though you expected perhaps a different outcome, they are beautiful to me!
    • Matt
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      mgoldberg
      watercolor techniques I typically use the wet on dry technique, and sometimes wet on wet (usually accidentally after having gotten the paper too wet and adding additional colors). I find the dry brush difficult to control.
    • Stefania
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      Stefiex22
      1. I have tried to use all the techniques. I have discovered that the wet-on-wet it my favourite. It is easier to use the wet-on-dry and I found difficult to do the dry brush techniques 2. I might incorporate the new watercolor techniques. Watercolors relax me very much. Male MallardWet On Dry
    • Colleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 43
      CBMac7
      EEDCC65F-C145-4316-BCF5-30E5D5312F03 Did some more practice & I am much more comfortable and confident now.
      • Christine
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        seadahl80
        I like the way you used wet-on-wet for the shadows and light on the mallard's head!
    • Les
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      Lesbrandt
      I experimented with all three techniques on this page of:  "Ok, what will I try next?" and with delight!                                  One of the important things I have learned is that life is too short to use cheap watercolor paper, or not even watercolor paper, and I still use stuff that makes good work all but impossible.  This is a page of Strathmore 400 Series Watercolor paper; it is not cotton base, but it is better than the note books I have been trying to use for watercolor.   IMG_0752
    • Colleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 43
      CBMac7
      1B048486-0C0B-4F24-8F9D-2E5CCA4F1AAE 1. Well without knowing anything about watercolors before this course, I have been using all 3 of them without knowing it. I use the Wet on Dry more than the others, but using Wet on Wet is more comfortable with the water brush. I also feel that I have more control of the amount of water released. As for some tips, I’ve found that I need to work in sections so that some of my drawing can dry to make layers. Also if I put down a very neutral base wash of color first then building upon that it gives my drawings a bit more depth. 2. Knowing the actual meaning of the terms I now know how to make sharp details or blending colors for different textures, sky, & water.
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      nstevick
      I'm developing a little more control with my brush strokes. Used wet on wet for the body, then wet on dry for the facial features and a combination of wet on dry and dry brush on the tree.IMG_20200525_095343682
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      Lindabeekeeper
      Had a bit of a time controlling the amount of water on my brush.  I seemed to have better success with a combination of techniques.  Need to practice more!paint techniques
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      nstevick
      I thought this emerald toucanet would be a good subject to try wet on wet, a technique I have never used. I know that Liz said to let the watercolors do their own thing, but I couldn't stop tinkering. Liz is correct, I did not improve my painting. I used wet on dry for the facial features and tried to use dry brush on the branch. I need to work on this technique, as I either put too much paint and water on the paper, or none! Adding color is helping me to look more carefully at what I am painting. Who knew one bird could have so many colors?!? The rainy season has just begun in Costa Rica, so I will be using these watercolor techniques when I paint from a photo or when I birdwatch from my porch!IMG_20200523_151947882
    • Kirsten
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      kirstenlissa
      I did a very quick practice of a feather using all three methods. This is not watercolor paper, and you can really tell on the wet on wet version. image
      • Iva
        Participant
        Chirps: 3
        iemoore
        cool
    • Avery
      Participant
      Chirps: 28
      boxturtlestudio
      I used wet in wet and wet on dry for these Koi fish. Technical question for Liz: how do you paint fish in water? How do do make the water darker, keep the fish colors and make them look underwater and not have a muddled mess?   Any help you can offer will be appreciated. Avery20200523_115817
    • LeslieAnne
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      lasanford
      555E9441-7CB6-4B90-8D94-1365B472B520I had some fun experimenting with all three techniques, and tried some quick gesture-type sketches with the aquabrush and watercolors. I found that keeping the brush extra dry helped with the finer lines, deeper color tones and necklaces of the warblers; a wetter brush helped soften the gray tones..I definitely need more practice, but it was lots of fun..I think all of these techniques will be very helpful in my journaling projects. I definitely will use the dry brush for tree branches and trunks; the wet on wet for skies and water scenes and the wet on dry will be helpful for getting colors on the paper, to refine with added details
    • Wendy
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      wave24
      I haven’t touched water colour since grade school so I’m still having trouble forming details and outlines.my feathers look more like blobs than feathers. But I am enjoying the colour and I love the water brush!
    • Suzy
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      slyttle
      I tried all three on this Mourning dove. The wing and the back was wet on dry, the head, chest, and bottom were wet on wet and the branch was dry on dry. I discovered I like wet on wet and letting the colors do their thing. I find I still add too much water. I also am trying to figure out wing textures. My dry on dry didn't super work. Again the amount of water is really hard for me! But I like the idea of that technique making certain textures.3WatercolorTech
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio
        • I love your sweet morning dove. Nice blending  of the colors and feather detail. 
    • Ranae
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      Puzzle Peace
      P1030080Have used all of the techniques but I found the simplified way of presenting and demonstrating helpful.  After referring to some Wyeth works for dry brush ex.'s, found bone on a wood table presented opportunity for all 3 methods.  Plan to utilize dry brush method more in the future.
    • Nancy
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      Nancr
      My first attempt is to use the dry on dry technique, or nearly dry.  I did this due to the small areas I was coloring.  I used by comparison drawing of the hornets and honey bee and added color to it.  I think the Asian hornet and the honey bee came out the best.  I found it was difficult to get the brush dry enough not to be runny, but I got the hang of it, I think.  I really enjoy working with color. Hornets and Honey Bee  04-25-20
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio
        Nice bees and wasps. Cool journal pages. I have been studying, photographing, and painting native bees this spring. I work at a nature center in Virginia. It's nice to see the work of another insect artist. Your Asian giant Hornet is amazing.
      • Nancy
        Participant
        Chirps: 19
        Nancr

        @Avery Thanks Avery.  I was a little surprised at it too.  I think the suggestion of the hand really is what makes it stand out.  I guess one has been found in eastern Washington so I hope this hornet can be stopped.

    • Tanis
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      tanislynn
      DSC02336 I have tried all three techniques but feel most comfortable with wet on dry. Wet-on-wet worked really well for doing the clouds in the Wasatch mountain picture. Wet-on-wet is still a challenge. Sometimes the brush is too dry and I pick up very little colour, other times it is too wet. In this picture of the Common Goldeneye I was able to apply a variety of techniques and felt more comfortable with how I was using the brush. The head of the duck is supposed to be iridescent green (looks black in the field) but that has been hard to achieve. Having fun trying though!
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio
        I love your Goldeneye. You captured the feathers and body nicely. Lovely cold sky and water. And your reflection is great, something I struggle with. Which came first, the reflection or the water, or. Did you do them together? Avery
    • amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      ajgwinters
      B965C3B3-6A98-4833-A6FD-32F908213C74Gah, wet-on-wet: too wet, colors too muted, etc.
      • Colleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 43
        CBMac7
        Hi Amy.  I love the way you captured the wonderful blended colors of the head & exquisite shadow of the bill. The details of the eye is great too.
    • Koen
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Nahtur
           There was no space to  post my experience with 3D painting of the next topic.  So I post it here.  I (carefully) put an egg  on the table.  I noticed it casted a double concentric shadow, so I tried to copy it. I had to move fast, because my paint was drying rapidly. This make the contours a little bit wobbly   making  the egg more look like a potato ;). Nevertheless, I am happy with this first attempt. Egg
    • Koen
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      Nahtur
      >   I tried several variations on the techniques and I watched various Youtube videos.  The  video of Makoccino on how to paint a simple feather in watercolor inspired me to repeat this exercise with the other techniques as well. It gave a first impression about their possibilities and limitations of the various techniques. Wet on wet creates the most wonderful color effects.  Challenges were controlling the amount of water, applying the paint at the right speed and matching the contours exactly. Dry on dry  is much easier to control . It looks more like a pencil drawing. Wet on dry turned out to be darker than anticipated, but it is a nice technique to use as an overlay on wet on wet, as shown on the left feather. feathers
      • Colleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 43
        CBMac7
        Hello Koen. Gorgeous looking feathers and the specific details of each technique are definitely easier to see in your drawings. Thanks for sharing this.
    • Leah
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      imchickadee
      I have tried doing wet on dry mostly. I like that technique because it is easy to do fine lines and it gives a clear color unlike some of the other techniques. Wet on wet has been a bit difficult for me though because it is a bit messy. Dry on dry is okay, but it doesn't give a clear color for me, so I prefer wet on dry overall. I think for my journaling projects, I think that I would use wet on wet for big spaces, dry on dry for items that have lots of texture, but I would typically use wet on dry.
    • Leslie
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      lesliehthomas
      fullsizeoutput_147b
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      Pamfooh2
      I never could have done this before this course.  Here is a red squirrel eating a bird seed.  This is an example of glazing.Screen Shot 2020-04-05 at 10.43.53 AM
      • Colleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 43
        CBMac7
        Gorgeous looking details. Very realistic. I like how your drawing gives a sense of soft fur. Thanks for sharing this drawing.
    • David
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      David Santos
      My exercises took me time. I'm not full adjusted to the dry-on-dry with the waterbrush. I must keep doing it. At some point I used the old style brushes to finish the painting. Maybe doing it in a small scale doesn't help too. These techniques for sure will be used while I'm doing nature journaling. For more satisfing results I need practice and practice more and more to give me better results. 91270993_1289293541461365_7744153942556147712_n91210989_2524867417782296_6934456614741082112_n91138977_248823976290011_7250680990727667712_n
      • Jenny
        Participant
        Chirps: 4
        JennyChapman
        These are just glorious, David!  You have such subtle and yet strong contrast , great shadows  and colors, and beautiful drawings 👏🏽👏🏽
      • Scott
        Participant
        Chirps: 11
        ScottA010
        David, you mentioned you not fully adjusted with the dry on dry with the water brush; I think the wren is wonderful painting, beautiful is the correct word. The other two are great also.
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      whipporwheel
      sketchbookHere are two pages from my sketchbook showing use of wash, glazing, blending, wet-on-wet, wet-on-dry, and dry-on-dry.  I looked back at some of my watercolors painted before I started this course, and wow!  What a difference.  Also, my sketchbook paper wasn't great for watercolor, so I found some old watercolor paper, cut it to size, and am painting on it and taping it into my sketchbook...
      • Stefania
        Participant
        Chirps: 19
        Stefiex22
        I like how you have used them Patricia, it reminds me to put together all the techniques I have been learning in this course
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      whipporwheel
      watercolor techniquesI've tried all three of these techniques.  It's difficult to do dry brush with a water brush...I'll just have to keep trying.  I hadn't thought about using wet on wet in my journal...great idea!
    • Seth
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      sfb28806
      Hello all,  I am a teacher learning how to distance teach for a rollout next Monday.  I have been taking breaks from he stress with a deep dive into Journaling.  I am really enjoying the watercolors and appreciate the instruction in this course. Bloodroot jpg RSHA jpg
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio
        Very nice journal pages, painting, lettering, info.
    • Heidi
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      HeidiTas
      Value in WatercolourPatience and practice!  I also think that my paper is a bit light weight, so maybe I shouldn't try too many layers.  Lots of fun things to keep trying.
      • Patricia
        Participant
        Chirps: 23
        whipporwheel
        I had the same problem, Heidi.  I found some old watercolor paper in my studio, cut it to size, and taped it into my sketchbook.  I like the weight of my sketchbook paper for drawing, but watercolor really needs thicker, textured paper to make the medium as effective as possible.
    • BJORN
      Participant
      Chirps: 37
      suzukiawd13
      IMG_20200314_165042~2Mixed Medium. Almost all Watercolors, some pen, pencil foundation, and metallics. R-Y-B-G-BL
    • Juan
      Participant
      Chirps: 18
      Juan Jo
      I tried all the techniques. Are for certainthings your going to do. IMG_9575
    • Geminis
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      geminis
      20200305_165340
      • Colleen
        Participant
        Chirps: 43
        CBMac7
        Hi Geminis. Great looking details on the hummingbird & flowers. Thanks for sharing this.
    • Christi-June
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      christijune
      Previously I have only used wet on dry. Dry on dry was tricky and I would like to incorporate that and wet on wet in my own journal. I'd like to see more of both in application. 20200215_101436
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      jalexaphotography
      I tried all three. I think the wet-on-wet would work better on a stretched paper. The journal buckled too much and the colors pooled in the indented warp. However, I think wet-on-wet showcases the uniqueness of watercolor paints so I'd very much like to find a way to incorporate it into my journaling.
    • Denise
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      dchaffner
      I love the iridescent quality of wet on wet paint technique. This was my first attempt. I think I will use it more often.image
    • Belinda
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      beekeev
      IMG_0440IMG_0439
    • Carrie
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Carlin70
      1.  Will be trying these in the field hopefully.  I find it hard to control the amount of water. 2.  I am just beginning journaling, so I don't have any great thoughts other than to add colors to my drawings to help round out my journaling.
    • David
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      yabking
      Ice Cave I am relatively new to watercolor, and had only done a little wet-on-dry before.  For this drawing, I used all three techniques: wet-on-wet for sky and open water, wet-on-dry for snow drift contours and cave water, and dry-on-dry for snow texture.  I really like the dry-on-dry results.  It took a bit of practice, and I also found that different water brushes yielded different results.  The Sakura brush was easiest to use, for me.  I'm certain I'll be using all three techniques from here on out.  This was a great lesson!
      • Constance
        Participant
        Chirps: 26
        constancekel
        Great work! The sky is so dramatic. I also am impressed by how you showed the texture on the ice. I struggle with planning ahead to leave white where I need it This is so nice.
      • Avery
        Participant
        Chirps: 28
        boxturtlestudio
        Very dramatic and an unusual subject. Nice use of watercolor,.!
    • Amy
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      amy_jay_bee
      When I was younger I was taught wet-on-wet but not the others. It was frustrating. This time I enjoyed it because I was curious what the paint would do. I like paintings that explore color, and wet on wet is a fun way to do it. I grew up in a watery area, and wet-on-wet is perfect for the play of light and color on water, or in the sky, or for fuzzy things in the distance. Wet on dry comes easiest. I like the possibility of detail. I’m still working on getting the right balance of pigment to water so I’m not getting that splodge at the end of the stroke. I had to really work at it to get the brush dry enough for dry on dry, but I like it for rough textures or stuttered white. It would be interesting to put a dry color over a lighter color so the light one shows through. I was thinking of sharing a wet on wet landscape sketch, but picked up the paper before it was dry and smudged it. Learn from my my mistake, y’all.
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      LindaMizzell
      I used the wet on dry technique with the purple pansy and the wet on wet with the mallard. I would also like to learn how to paint the detail and catch the light colors in the flower or leaves. This was challenging with matching colors and adding details. I need practice with the dry brush technique. This is a first for me. image
    • Christy
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      ChristyMorrow
      I tried some pansies with the wet on dry technique. (Didn't know that was what I was doing when I painted this>)  I was mainly trying to match the colors. This is the first thing I have ever painted.  I'm not sure how to work in all of the details using water colors. I would like to use water colors in my journal, especially when coloring the birds I see.  Also leaves and plants. IMG_4343
    • Sandy
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      SRMelton
      I tried to incorporate each of the techniques, wet on wet, wet on dry, and dry brush. I had an hour outside, and finished with an hour or so inside. I was wishing I'd taken a photo to remind me of the color and light details. The dry brush technique will take some IMG_0012practice!
      • William
        Participant
        Chirps: 12
        RaptorFalconFinch5
        Hi Sandy, this is absolutely amazing! Are you able to share any tips on how you did it?
    • Elizabeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      Ek2012
      I like the control of wet on dry technique. I can see use for other methods though. Dry brush for details and textures, wet on wet for wash areas. it’ll be fun to try out in the field, but it’s pouring rain lately and it’d be all wet on wet if I went out now! Journaling in the Pacific Northwest isn’t easy.
    • Montecito
      Participant
      Chirps: 22
      favelasco
      I used wet on dry,  think is better to detail the plants. it dries quicker. It is important to have a good paper, mine is not good quality and does not work with many layers and gets bad with a lot of water. I would like to try wet on wet, but it seems a bit difficult. To apply this on my journal, a would like to start with simple specimens, such as a leaf or a flower, not a complete landscape. Because that way, i can find a compact palette and work on less details at a time.
    • Sarah
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Smyrna38
      My biggest question is how do you keep the paper from 'buckling' using too wet of a brush? This is all new to me, and the control is going to take some time. The hint of having a test paper handy for both color matching and now this brush technique, esp dry on dry, is quite handy. I'll be using these in the field next time out. I took a pic of a stream going under a bridge because I was too frightened to try sketching it...I think I'm ready! I loved seeing how some leaves caught on the edges of the rocks while others kept floating downstream. The light playing off the stream as it came through the trees also caught my eye. I'm going to take all the time I need to sketch, then paint, this scene!
      • Lee Ann van Leer
        Bird Academy
        LilacRoller
        Hello to Sarah and anyone wondering about "buckling" of paper.   Liz Fuller has this reply on the topic: This is a good question - using appropriately thick mixed-media or watercolor paper is the first step for sure. If you use thin paper it will buckle right away. My next piece of advice is to be strategic about how much water you use - try to control it and only use what you need! This comes with practice and comfort using your brush. Lastly - always let the paper dry between your layers of watercolor. There is a certain amount of buckling that will happen no matter what, but these steps should minimize the buckle!--Liz Fuller ===================== Holly, one of the featured Nature Journalers in our journal styles video has this advice:   This is a problem I have too. I solve it by using less water and more paint, and making sure I don't add too much water at a time. That's not always possible depending what you're painting though - I've heard stretching the watercolor paper before you start can help in these cases. I've never tried it, but have always wanted to, and I know there's tons of YouTube videos on techniques! Basically, it's submerging the whole sheet in water for ~20mins or so. --Holly   ================ We'd love to have other journalers give feedback on what methods they have tried or had success with to reduce this buckling issue.
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