• Anastasis
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      It helped a lot to measure the proportions with a simple tool like a pencil. I draw my orchid I have at home. I will use it next time for outside. WhatsApp Image 2021-12-09 at 19.23.42
    • Dawn
      Participant
      Chirps: 23
      This is a really valuable tool to use in the field or anywhere.  I have always struggled with getting the proportions right.  This could work well with a still subject, but not so much, for a moving one.  I feel like it is easier to do with plants in general and more difficult with any type of animals (especially humans) since we are so tuned in to how they should be portrayed accurately.  Feels like there is more room with plants and more abstract subjects like landscapes.   IMG_1204IMG_1146
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      Negative space FlamingoSnake plant Using negative space for the colored centers of these leaves was easy. The technique was more difficult to apply, and probably not as successful, when I tried to use it from the "outside in" to create the shape of the bird in the other picture. It was a real challenge to create the fringe of tail feathers by drawing in the background vegetation, for example. But I enjoyed seeing how far I could take it. Crane - negative space
    • Beth
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      IMG_3026
    • Jacqueline
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      Using the technique of pencil and ruler to measure was so helpful. While drawing the praying mantis,I don't think I Would have come close to getting all the parts of the mantis in proportion to each other.  I used the head to base my measurements on for the thorax, abdomen and legs. The praying mantis was very slow moving and climbed right up onto my journaling sketchbook. I was then able to snap a few pictures that helped me use my pencil and ruler for sizing. When doing the sketch of the praying mantis I referred to the picture I took and that helped immensely with negative space.So all in all I think the proportion is fairly close to being accurate but it will certainly take much more practice to become more proficient. so all in all I think the proportion is fairly close to being accurate but it will certainly take much more practice to become more proficient4E3E997B-D58F-4010-8B8E-64E299DC8326
    • Marc
      Participant
      Chirps: 16
      image I actually really enjoyed this assignment, I’ve always had problems with proportions and this helped me build confidence with such a simple method. With fast moving birds or critters I had a much more difficult time but I’m certain that with practice I will be fine. With plants on the other hand a wondrous tool to have available.
    • Claire
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      It has really helped to adjust my quick sketches and to focus more closely on details.
    • Himesha
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      IMG_9097
      • Measuring proportions makes it easier to get the height or length or width of some object when drawing exactly.
      • Though it is hard measuring the proportion in some objects in the field, comparatively it's easy with most.
      • It gives you an idea of how you should draw the subject.
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 74
      I am think am OK with proportions, especially with birds, since I have drawn more birds than anything else. IMG_20210810_174456
    • Carolyn
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      img301 darkened
    • Carolyn
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      Seems to be close to accurate.  However, some objects  and fields are easier to measure using this technique than other. img300 darkened
    • Gerda
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      for some reason I am unable to upload my sketches. I love the negative painting, I also went on a hike the day before this lesson and saw this ladyslipper orchid. they are protected here in the State of Oregon and Washington.
    • Christine
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      IMG_1698
    • Lisa
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Lighting treeI have wanted to sketch this tree ever since I started this course. It was a perfect candidate for the exercise and the "pencil" trick worked beautifully. I should have used a whole sheet of paper so I could have put more of the tree (charred pieces laying about) onto the page as well. I also sketched a ladyslipper from a photo as well.
    • Margaret
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      I made the mistake of starting by trying to draw a clump of multi petalled tulips, which were complex flowers as well as having lots  of leaves.  This was challenging as there was so much detail (maybe I should try not to do everything) but focusing on the negative space and proportions, made it easier.    I also did a simpler clump of narcissi as well.  The pencil technique was useful - I have seen people do this, but never quite understood what they were doing. IMG_1720 IMG_1721
    • Dee
      Participant
      Chirps: 40
      F99A25E0-7EE4-40F3-BF8A-DC36431724CE
      • Dee
        Participant
        Chirps: 40
        I tried using the pencil tip to judge proportion between the flower and the stem and leaf length.   This is a white daffodil and it has some especially interesting texture on the flower .
    • I find it challenging to get the proportions right both horizontally and vertically. It's certainly more easy when it is from a photo or a subject that holds still, like a landscape. I do feel that it helps to use this technique. I saw that Liz used an actual ruler when she drew the plant in the last video and it seems like a helpful tool to try out in the field.
    • Dee
      Participant
      Chirps: 40
      NEGATIVE SPACE 4-14-21
      • Dee
        Participant
        Chirps: 40
        I think that concentrating on negative space is very useful to help you to define and refine shapes and proportions more accurately.  Color or value of background can interfere or complicate identifying neg spaces.
    • May
      Participant
      Chirps: 25
      Drawing in the field is challenging. I'm looking at subjects that I like at the same time I'm trying to capture what I see on 2D sheet. Measuring proportion and thinking about negative space are amazing to depict what I see and manage my drawings. Measuring proportions made my drawing more realistic. Before, I used to produce drawings that looks a bit similar to the object I'm drawing but size varies. Now I can see the relation within the object itself and measure its components. It is making looking and drawing more easy. thinking about negative shapes is amazing when I draw in the field. Measuring proportions is easy when looking at subjects that are not moving. When the subject is moving its challenging. I did not give it a try yet. I'm working on subjects that are not moving for now. I will give it a try when I grasp the concept and becomes easy to draw the exact proportions of subject. Below are two drawings of subject on my porch. It was a beautify day to draw and enjoy both techniques.   IMG_1117IMG_1118
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 17
      Greenhouse Nothing is growing in the greenhouse yet but it's a nice place to sit and draw and an easy place to practice proportion.
    • Emma
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      18A69E6A-0E71-4EF6-9C34-1DD58ECDF30ADF18C184-89F3-4237-9F40-51CC6D980D73E2982E5E-E759-4A6E-AA8D-96AE8959E158I drew my cat and some grackles that were on my porch. The grackle drawings are from photos I took, because it was too wet to draw outside today. I also did a drawing where I zoomed in on my cat's fluffy ear - it has a little tuft on the end!
    • Janine
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      dimensions
    • Janine
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Negative space
    • Barbara
      Participant
      Chirps: 11
      Since it is still winter, I used the animal cams on explore.org to find animals to sketch. In the second sketch, I used the top of the head to the shoulders as my reference. I used that reference for the length of the beak and the vertical proportions of the body. image image With the cat sketch, I used the negative space to define the white fur.
    • Kathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 28
      flamingoPepito.shape I started with a quick sketch for the drawing of my dog. Then, I filled in the negative space and after that, I checked myself for proportions. I decided to just scribble to suggest the curly fur of my poodle and that was fun.
      • Tara Mc
        Participant
        Chirps: 14
        love the use of the scribble technique. It really works. I've used it for a pumice stone first and then to add texture to a toad. It's my favourite shading techniques. Must find other uses for it ;) - always makes me smile. Thanks for your share.