• Valerie P Stevens
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      Maple LeafOak Leaf
      • Janice
        Participant
        Chirps: 9
        These leaves are stunning. The colors are so beautiful. Well done!
      • Sallie
        Participant
        Chirps: 11

        @Janice I agree!  Valerie, are you using colored pencils or watercolors?  Your colors are so vibrant!

    • Julia
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      IMG_4763   I really enjoyed drawing these 2 flowers.  I used a picture that I took back in September.  There was enough information in the picture that I took to record the flowers and the leaves for each plant.  This was really fun.  I will be doing more of these types of studies.  Thank you!
    • Linda
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      I enjoyed this comparison study as it encouraged me to focus on fine details of each leaf. Autumn is the best season to study leaf structures and color changes. This study allowed me to ask very curiously questions, such as why the color changes of each leaf are different and how the cooler temperatures affect this change. After completing each drawing, I found myself returning to add more detail. IMG_1333
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 34
      I am enjoying comparison studies, I have been focusing on patterns and got out my hand lens recently for closer looks.  I found that acorns have more texture to them than is obvious to the naked eye and that pine cones are really hard to draw.EA542C86-9799-4594-B1DA-AD07AF4FF5D8
    • Gayle
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      I think making the comparisons helped me pay more attention to the details. Writing and recording numerical data provide information I am unable to successfully show in my drawings. As my drawing skills improve, I will probably incorporate less writing and data.   IMG_0656
    • Constance
      Participant
      Chirps: 26
      IMG_20321) I compared two plants on my deck. I am a beginner at sketching and it took me a lot of time. I enjoyed it so much but this did make me wonder how I can adapt my work for going out in the field--my goal for my nature journal. I know that practice will help me work more efficiently, but are there other things I can do to capture important points about the subjects in a shorter time period? Birds are not going to sit still for me. I continue to be surprised by just how much more I observe when I draw. Drawing also gives me more time to think about questions I have. I have a biology background, so I think my observational skills are quite good. However, this study showed me just how much more I can grow in this regard. 2)This question of balance is key for me. When I finished drawing, I first thought I was done until I realized I had done no writing! Quantitative data is important, but asking questions led me to go back and do even more observations. I have an additional page or writing I didn't upload. In the earlier video on journal styles, one person had lots of boxes on her pages. I think this might be useful for me to use this more to force me to have a box for quantitative data, one for qualitative observations, one for questions , etc.
      • Susan
        Participant
        Chirps: 30
        These are beautifully rendered. The shading using stippling works really well and you captured the dimensionality and depth in the individual plants. Congrats!
      • Constance
        Participant
        Chirps: 26

        @Susan Thanks so much for the kind words!

    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 34
      Another rainy day comparison.  I used a hand lens to look closely at the two plants. 84348607-7F8C-4C86-BB41-EFCFF6C4951A
    • Patricia
      Participant
      Chirps: 1
      WIN_20191101_13_00_51_ProToday was way to smokey to go outside but I had these pine cones as part of an indoor arrangement.  Watching our instructor draw her comparisons really helped me.  I have very little experience and learned a lot from watching her.
    • Christy
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      I have been putting this off because of rain and then we had a hard freeze last night so there went the flowers.  So I chose the berries.  This assignment is great because it is really helping me to be more observant.  I'm having fun with these challanges. Hnkh1ZCuQM6cYtPpYLuyLA_thumb_6c6c
    • Mary Jo
      Participant
      Chirps: 12
      IMG_6158
    • Seth
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      Comparison 1.) I really enjoyed this study.  These feathers have been on my mantle for six months, but I truly saw them for the first time tonight.  I learned that, although they have the same basic pattern elements, there are big differences in coloration, speckling, and contrast. 2.) I would like to try to add more numerical data because I have never thought to do it before.  It would make it more scientific.  I have only ever noted the presence of birds I hear while journaling so that I can imagine the atmosphere after the fact.  It would be interesting to count plants, flowers, insects etc as well.
    • Jean
      Participant
      Chirps: 4
      I enjoyed this activity. I selected two specimens of Holly from my garden. It was interesting to examine the many differences between the plants. The Winterberry was new to my garden so a fairly immature plant while the English Holly is very large and over 25 years old. I thought the difference in the leaves were especially interesting. I took some additional time to read about both species. I learned a bit about how to distinguish English Holly from native American Holly.IMG_2263
    • Valerie P Stevens
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      mushrooms
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 34
      Comparison study of two different maple leaves, with shadow and palette practice.  The sugar maple is not quite as dark as I expected, but the watercolors are very new for me.  Not much painting experience or even detailed drawing prior to this course. image
      • Charlene
        Participant
        Chirps: 2
        I love that you're experimenting with color. It not only adds more data about the leaves you're comparing, it also really brings the images to life, as if you've invited the readers along on your outing.  I have a watercolor set but I still haven't dipped a brush into it. Seeing your work is really making me want to try adding color to my descriptions. Thanks!
    • Donna
      Participant
      Chirps: 34
      Autumn garden makes for some good comparison of plants at the end of season. image
    • sondra
      Participant
      Chirps: 21
      Colorful leave are falling everywhere and I wondered what determines their colors. I drew an Northern Red Oak leaf which is reddish and a yellow Norway Maple for comparison. Checking on Wikipedia I found there are 2 pigments present after their the chlorophyll has left the leaves because of dropping temperatures and less sunlight. Carotenoids which are already present in the leaf come through as yellow, orange and brown. Anthrocyanins present as reds and purples. Thank you Wikipedia.573D0CEC-E469-4FF8-A40B-BCB1C3432214
    • Lucia
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      I started with the drawings and then added descriptions of the subjects.  I’d like to also use the journal to remember a walk or a special time with family. The comparison study is informative and enjoyable. My second comparison of two very similar flowers, the vinca  and impatiens was rewarding.
    • Lucia
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      imageimage
    • Doris
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Was able to finally go outside and devote some time to this. I was surprised at the differences in the 2 leaves.  I fear my drawings do not reflect that but perhaps in time...I am attempting photography and this course 745EE326-2D4C-46D3-B3B5-978912BE90AB_1_201_awill help me see the small details I have overlooked so far. I think I need to work on ordering the writing so it makes sense when you go back to review. As others have said, writing with a pencil is taking me back...old school!
      • Constance
        Participant
        Chirps: 26
        I am really taken by your close observations on these two seemingly simple objects. Your sketches really give me the "feel" of these two leaves and how different they are.  Your observations are so good and so diverse--exposure to sunlight, leaf and bark texture, leaf margins, vein pattern. This made me realize that I should have narrowed my scope and made better observations on a smaller scale.
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      Simple versus Complex. I challenged myself by choosing a rather complex subject to draw, but liked the comparison of two different kinds of seed carriers, a pine cone containing  multiple seeds and a hickory nut containing only one seed. I wondered why the pine tree produces so many seeds and the hickory relatively few in comparison. I included the leaves because the hickory has a more complex leaf as compared to the pine. IMG_1193
      • Laurie
        Participant
        Chirps: 15
        Karen, your rendering of the pine cone has me smiling, as it seems to perfectly encapsulate not only the object itself but also the smells and evocation of this time of year. Lovely! Cheers, Laurie
      • Claire
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        This is so effective and well drawn.
    • Kevin
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      img20191024_10400468
      • Lisa
        Participant
        Chirps: 13
        I would have never thought to try to draw individual feathers! I am a bird lover so your drawing (as well as the one who did feathers above this post) have inspired me to try some. I don't have anything as exciting as a road runner feather (how lucky to have that) but I guess I could start with the many crow feathers and pigeon feathers I find. Great idea!
    • Erin
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      I decided to work with elements that I found interesting in the lesson.  1) Demo is drawn so fast - I don't trust my skill level so I tend to draw slowly.  2) The details are suggested but not always drawn in detail.   3) ask and muse about answers - I tend to figure someone already has the answer so if I ask, why not look it up... but it could be kind of fun to muse first.   I sat in our front yard a bit away from the trees and tried a rough and quick comparison. Nothing fancy, but I was pleasantly surprised at how curious I became about the tree growth and trying to remember anything I know about leaf types (not much) so it could help to do a little research to remember complex and compound vs other leaf types.). QuickCompare
    • Kieki
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      1. This is the first time I did a comparison study and I found it to be really helpful.  It helped me to observe the differences and similarities and guided some of my observations.  I feel that it helped me study to object in more depth, and will help to grow my observation skills. 2.  I think this is helpful to from time to time include all this information in my journal.  It will help later to identify certain objects and most definitely expand my knowledge of the variety of objects found in nature all around me.
    • Kieki
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      image
    • Bill
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      IMG_1518I It rained most of today so I compared these two oak leaves working inside. One new thing I learned is  that not only each lobe had a vessel, but each sub-lobe had one as well.  I wondered if the branched "veins" only carried sugars away from the leaf or if nutrients also flow back into the leaf.  It seems there are these types of oak species (rounded or pointed lobes), and oaks with no lobes.  The leaves reminded me of my own hand, especially the back. I felt that I need to draw hundreds of leaves before I'll begin to appreciate the structure of leaves, and that's just the leaf!  The whole tree.  It's an endless journey. The other student drawings are so interesting!
      • Claire
        Participant
        Chirps: 29
        I'm hoping to be able to simplify my drawing and subject matter like you have done with your comparison study of these two leaves. They are great drawings and look good on your page.