• Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 20
      April 12th, 2023, Connecticut. I noticed a little Sanguinaria blooming, and had to sketch it - and then I compared it to another, growing in different corner of the yard. Your prompt questions are super-pertinent to my effort - Balance is the key word. My writing took over the page. Next time I'll try those boxes! and write neatly, and perhaps make my observations more precise. Part of the problem may have stemmed from the fact that when I started the left half of the page, I hadn't chosen a subject for the right half yet (oops) and didn't really have a plan... IMG_1982
    • Maribeth
      Participant
      Chirps: 43
      Finished copy 2
    • Razgirl
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      DD4CA146-2BD1-4643-8EF6-4AD8F23F774FI collected a pine cone on my walk today. I planned on getting another one form a different pine tree to compare them. I then realized we only have that type of pine tree in our neighborhood. I decided to improvise, and just use the one pinecone and compare the side view versus the top view since they do look a lot different. The top of the pinecone really had a pretty pattern, but I couldn’t really replicate the swirl of the pattern like the real thing.A9324812-BE8E-48B6-9CFD-3E21B8F84FA7433A6C61-A9CB-4BF0-A848-C67CB041CA01
    • Kim
      Participant
      Chirps: 9
      IMG_1903IMG_1904I did two comparison studies, one indoors (left) and one outdoors (right).  I need to work on my outdoor sketching.  It seems that the sun and wind moving the objects around made it more difficult for me to focus on drawing.  I feel my outdoor sketch was more of a gesture drawing.  Maybe the idea would be to take a photo of the outdoor items and refine when back indoors.  I was able to take color notes and to make comparisons between the leaves, petals, etc.
    • Jessie
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
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    • It does make me notice more details as in smoothness and stiffness of leaves, which can't be determined in a drawing or you wouldn't notice when looking at one plant at a time.  If a detail is hard to draw then more writing is required.  Dimensions would help if you can't draw each item to scale because of a size difference.Comparison
    • James
      Participant
      Chirps: 19
      IMG_4820
    • Carole
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      Journal compare Great project. Really delved into the nitty gritty of anatomy and saw so many things I never noticed before.  I find I am too verbal!  I write too much even though I try to draw in detail,  I need to find a balance.
    • Michelle
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      I was working indoors today (mobility issues) and realized that, despite seeing these house plants daily, there was so much I never really noticed prior to this study! I had never really paid attention to the tiny details, or asked questions about the plants beyond "do they need water," and, "is this good light for them?" I definitely wonder how to balance drawing and recording numerical data- I think the subject matter might aid that, though. Or maybe the questions that arise. IMG_7666
    • Cheryl
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      Decided to do a backyard bird feeder comparison of a Dark eyed junko and Black-capped Chickadee.  Two birds that are common at my feeder.  Taking the time to draw each bird helped to bring out differences that I hadn't noticed before.  Feeding strategy, size and even their beak color and structure are a little different.   PXL_20221228_193022239.MP
    • Nora
      Participant
      Chirps: 8
      This is a very useful strategy for comparing similar species, in particular.  I didn't have the opportunity to see two similar species on the same day, but I would like to now practice this exercise with photos of Scaups and Ring Necked Ducks or American Wigeons and Green Winged Teals for example.  As for balancing drawing, writing, and recording data--I think its about taking the time and creating a habit around the practice.  Sometimes it's easier to draw than to write or collect information, and the other takes more effort.  When I'm rushed or feeling unmotivated, I can rely on a routine.  3,2,1IMG_9271
    • Susan
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      The weather kept me in.  I drew 2 similar house plants.  I noticed both plants had purple undersides on their leaves.  One had striped, almost heart shaped leaves and the other had long slim leaves that had copious leaf shaped marks. 5A8105BA-E890-4D88-82D6-5472D4E93DBD
    • Cynthia Schoen
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      • IMG-1868
      • Susan
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        Nice comparison!
      • Michelle
        Participant
        Chirps: 6
        These images are beautiful and the use of color really helps in comparing them!
      • Katelynn
        Participant
        Chirps: 5
        Those water reflections really caught my eye!
    • Diane
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      IMG_0782 The weather kept me indoors so I observed 2 of my house plants.  It was fun to discover the different aspects of these plants I see and care for daily. And a lovely spider dropped by for a visit.  I am trying to play with light and shadow to do more justice to the subjects.
      • Susan
        Participant
        Chirps: 7
        Great job on capturing different shapes!
    • Tara Mc
      Participant
      Chirps: 14
      First day this week without rain, so walked up the hill behind my house to a granite plateau that has a moss and lichen bed surrounded by hardwood trees, mostly maple. I sat where I had a good close view of at least two distinct mosses and one lichen, some clumped solo, some patches where two or all three were together. The lichen was identifiable as coral lichen, a pale grey green, very soft in the moist ground but seen elsewhere in Ontario on the Canadian Shield of Georgian Bay. The other two are mosses. When I returned home, I tried to identify from one book I have and found the moss id language a little overwhelming but I believe the one that looked like a lime-green feathery mini flat tree-like form is called a plume moss and the third, either a hair cap moss or a juniper moss. I suspect the former as there are no juniper bushes here. It has swirls of spiky close to bottle green leaves and a bit of a root system. The other two were very shallowly connected to the ground with no discernible roots when a sprig or two were easily removed from the clump. On the way home, I also noticed two other kinds of moss and will sketch them soon. I wonder if these three are indigenous to Ontario only? Or to the Canadian Shield?  I wondered why the lichen and plume moss had such shallow roots that mean that they come off the ground in clumps. Is this a survival mechanism, allowing the patch to be kicked up and resettled on a different shallow bed of humus and rock? [looking forward to learning how to use watercolours, especially when it comes to shading and fine details] IMG_4182
    • Cathleen
      Participant
      Chirps: 7
      A2C53357-8876-4CCD-AE48-E536BB546188
    • Cecilia Louise
      Participant
      Chirps: 13
      It was lots of fun. We have a lot of trilliums in our woods, red and white, and I wanted to spot differences and similarities between them. I wrote down some questions that I thought of while doing it. IMG_20220905_102322
    • Gillie
      Participant
      Chirps: 26
      Cottontree Esplanade Park is alongside the river mouth and has many native trees.  They get lots of salt spray and sea breezes.  I chose two that looked different and sat for 40 minutes.  I was pleased I didn't feel nearly as self-conscious sitting there as I thought I might.  Also I was surprised how many differences I discovered in the detail of the trees and how looking for those differences improved my knowledge of them both.  What a great exercise! Comparison study
    • Dann
      Participant
      Chirps: 6
      Backyard garden viewing of two brilliant flowers, plus an unexpected visit from a flying friend.Comparison Study_DW_28June2022
    • Karen
      Participant
      Chirps: 15
      • I saw a downy woodpecker when I was on my last hike and took a picture.  We have hairy woodpeckers in our area but I have  never seen one.  Although this was a study done at home, I asked and tried to answer questions.  It was a lot of fun and I learned a lot too.  Although my favorite medium is watercolor, I tried out a new one after watching a video by Liz Clayton Fuller—gouache!  I like it!  This course is great and although I am progressing slowly, I am learning a lot and having fun too!
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      • Zjences
        Participant
        Chirps: 26
        Great wood peckers Karen! Love the Details. Amazing!
    • Cheryl
      Participant
      Chirps: 10
      cactus  comparison
    • Katie
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      I compared two citrus trees in my yard.  I have a lemon tree and bitter orange tree. I was able to notice subtle differences in the leaves, the thorniness of the trees, and how the fruits clump.  I am not very good at sitting still or drawing, but I suppose I will improve.  It's interesting how my senses started to tune into your surroundings while doing this.  I started to notice the sweet smell of citrus and an uncharacteristic warm breeze.
    • Natalia
      Participant
      Chirps: 2
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    • Janet
      Participant
      Chirps: 5
      I planted two types of kale last year and it has wintered through -10 degree C temperatures and still produces delicious leaves. Right now the plants are flowering and there is an abundance of yellow. So, I decided to compare the two types. I have really taken them for granted. I know one plant provides small, 1 - 1.5 inch leaves, which are tougher, serrated, and the other provides leaves sometimes between 5 - 7 inches long. These are soft, papery leaves with tough leaf stems. Spending time allowed me to closely look at the leaf design and how each attaches to the main stalk. It also allowed me to compare the flowers and how the buds form then open. There were some similarities in flowers and both types had flowers of similar size and were yellow with only slight variation in colour. I know the pollinators like the flowers because I have seen some on there before. I looked carefully and saw the stamens in the centre, four in each flower on each plant. I laid out my page the same as Liz had done in her demonstration and this seemed to work well when comparing two plants.
    • Allison
      Participant
      Chirps: 3
      20220502_171326