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Active Since: June 8, 2020
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 31

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Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 31 total)
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    Nancy, Yes, clear expectations is a must.  Thanks for bringing up 'chunking' this is very important for our young scientists to have information chunked and helps us with providing the needed scaffolding. Thanks!
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    Yes, I agree that learners often work hard on their reports, but some reports will be stronger than others.  I believe if you front load the expectations by providing a clear rubric, go over previous samples or exemplars and provide time to conference with each student will provide enough support for each student to find success.  I believe my students will be able to easily record the data, but I think they may have some issues on how to report the data.   I can see myself having a couple of lessons on how to take data and create graphs.  I also believe that for some of my students they will require accommodations by having different expectations and a different rubric.
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    Amy, Thanks for sharing!  I teach 6th graders and some of them lack in confidence just as your 1st graders.  I think is truly a challenge as teachers.  The other point I thought of the child who tend to be a perfectionist.  They could potentially have problems if their results disprove their hypothesis.  So much to think about!  Thanks again.
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    When teaching a lesson on Melting and Freezing points, I led an experiment on the fastest way to get ice to melt without using more water.  I did not call it an inquiry-based activity, but my classes questioned, predicted and then followed through with the activity.  One cup was ice alone, another cup had ice and table salt, and a third cup changed in each class as per predictions and class votes. They measured the amount of liquid water appeared in each cup every two minutes for twenty minutes.   Even after much thought and discussion of the procedures, reviewing the use and reading of a ruler, and even pre-labeling cup 1, cup 2 and cup 3, I still faced challenges.  Some of the challenges I faced were supporting all of the needs of my students.  On that particular day, my aide in three classes was out sick without a substitute.  In focusing on my attention on making sure all students received their supplies to get started, I was not able to support all of the needs within each class.  Some students just dumped everything in one cup, some students were unable to read a ruler, etc.  The students still had a fun time and enjoyed themselves.  Then I brought the students who were unable to complete the lab in at another time for a make-up lab.
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    Johanna, Thanks for the post.  I think involving families it a terrific idea.  The more the merrier and they can motivate each other!  Nice job!
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    Annette, Thanks for sharing.  I think it is fabulous that your school has a set of 4 camera traps.  This sounds like a very fun and exciting project.  I wonder if my school could get some camera traps through some kind of funding or grant initiative?  I will have to look into it.  Thanks again for the great ideas.
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    I chose to research The Monarch Larva Monitoring Project (MLMP).  I chose this project, because I thought it would interesting to look at the distribution of milkweed and the abundance of breeding monarchs.  The data was very accessible and yes, I believe anyone could use this Citizen Science based data.  The data was presented in a way I believe my 6th grade students could access and compare the data.  The data was very comprehensive.  Students could use and compare data from different states, different years and different times of the same year.  Students could conduct their own investigation.  They could pose a question using Estimating the Monarch Survival over the years, develop a hypothesis and then make some interesting conclusions. They could then use the data from Estimating the Monarch Survival to create their own graph to show any trends.   There are so many ways to use this data; I believe its endless.  
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    Nancy, Thanks for sharing.  I like the idea of a walk to "Let's see if we see anything new"!  I have a unit on Living Things and that would fit nicely.  I also like the idea of slowing down to observe and then record their observations in a "Nature Journal".  Thanks again.
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    I will begin every new unit with a question and an activity to spark interest in the unit.  I try not to give step by step instructions or procedures and rather allow it to a time of discovery.  As the unit progresses, I start the new lesson off by review and questioning previously acquired knowledge.  This gives me an insight into what my students know and which ones need more time.  I often do a "What Do You Think? segment where I have students think about topic and then write why it may occur.  This allows students to think outside the box and predict.  However, I believe I can do more.  I want my students to do more daily observation themselves, collect data and report their findings.  I want to try new lessons where my students really see themselves as scientists.
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    The Citizen-Science project I chose to participate in was Project FeederWatch.  To begin, I printed out the smaller version of the Common Feeder Birds poster and Tally Sheet.  I observed and recorded Day 1, morning and Day 1, afternoon numbers.  Being new to bird watching one of the challenges I faced was identifying the birds.  The common birds in my area were easily identified such as Northern Cardinal, Blue Jay and Black-capped Chickadee, but there was a bird I could not easily identify.  I plan to reach out to my administration and ask for support to formally join Project FeederWatch for our school.  By participating in this project, I would like my students to not only develop their inquiry and observation skills, but also ignite their love of nature and caring for our planet, Earth.
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    Amy, Thanks for sharing; you have a very interesting point in that we are catalyst by modeling!  You are so right!  It is our responsibility as teachers to model and encourage the 'Inquiry' of wonder, explore and observe. Thanks.
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    Antoinette, I wholeheartedly agree!  Our students need more time outside to explore, observe and wonder.  They need to be more driven by their own 'Inquiry' and less driven by curriculum.  Thanks for sharing.
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    I believe the first step for educators to be catalysts for students is to get them out of their seats, observing and wondering.  We must constantly be thinking of innovative ways to to spark our students 'Inquiry'.  We need to provide a focused platform by providing open-ended questions for them to ponder and wonder, and then an area to explore. Students through exploration will develop their own questions and 'I Wonder' moments.  Sometimes I feel we are so driven by curriculum and time that we do not take time (or have time) for students to just explore.  Our students are the scientists of tomorrow and they need time and a place to explore.
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    Elisabeth, I agree.  I typically depending on many of my senses working together.  By completing my Sound Map it really helped me to stop and listen to the world around me.  Thanks for sharing.
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    Beverly, Yes, I agree that being mindful will instill the observer, for and us and our students!  I have not heard of the book, Listening Walk, but I will be sure to read it!  Thanks for sharing.
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    The most impactful aspect of creating my sound map was stopping and closing my eyes in my small backyard.  I did not expect to hear all of the sounds I heard.  It made me wonder, I am guilty of not stopping and "smelling the roses"?  Do I hear the sounds all around me?  Am I busy running around and not taking time to appreciate all of the nature and sounds surrounding my world.  I think this would be a great activity for my students.  We have a beautiful courtyard and a pond with a fountain filled with Koi fish and frogs.  Trees, shrubs, and perennials attract lots of birds and ducks have been known to nest here, as well.  Allowing my students to take time to use their senses will nurture the scientists within!IMG_1891
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    The 'I Wonder' board does seem like a great way to begin the inquiry for our new and upcoming scientists!  I hope to use the 'I Wonder' board to introduce 6th grade science to my new students this year.
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    Yes, I agree whole-hardheartedly that questioning and seeking answers is such a natural process and students will be authentically engaged.
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    Some of the practices I feel will be most important and work best in my classroom are setting my students up as scientists, have them start thinking and acting locally and globally, and of course, welcome the unexpected.  I am looking to set up some lessons and activities that will both encourage and promote my students as scientists.  Their minds should feel empowered to ask, explore and discover.  I want them to be thinking about the world around them, but then challenge them to think broader and more encompassing.  I want my students to look for surprises and relish in what is uncovered.  With these practices I hope to open up minds to new thinking, nurture new ideas and guide findings into new investigations.
  • Dianne
    Participant
    dhaley1
    Amy,   I agree, as well!  Our students are the scientists of tomorrow!  I love the idea of empowering them to change our world for the better.  Thanks for sharing, Dianne
Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 31 total)