Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: July 6, 2020
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 33

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Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 33 total)
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    Nini, I agree that a rubric is extremely important in helping Special Education students be successful. Revisiting the rubric to keep students on task throughout the process is a good idea for all students as are also issues of procrastination that often waylay the best of intentions.
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    I thought the rubrics presented in this lesson were excellent. I have always been a supporter of using rubrics because they give students a clear guide for what they need to do and what information needs to be collected. This is valuable to students when they complete a project because it helps them to organize their thoughts and determine the best way to present the information. It also increases the chances for success for differently abled learners. I would use a rubric like these, or a variation of these depending on the project, to assess inquiry-based projects. As a mom of two differently abled learners I have experienced firsthand how hard it is for some students to be successful. A rubric is a great tool for all students to do their best work.
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    Veronica never give up or give in! Keep doing what you are doing. The students will benefit from the fact that you care enough to keep going, even with obvious lack of support, and from your genuine enthusiasm for them and your project. Students are sponges and will learn from your positive lesson and carry that experience through their lifetime.
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    My biggest challenge is lack of understanding about inquiry-based activities and/or the opportunity to use them. I will need to tackle this issue with information, education and patience. I teach nutrition education and work with school gardens in collaboration with 5 local schools and teach one-hour classes as a “specials” teacher. We have specific curriculum that is required for me to teach with but citizen science and/or inquiry-based activities are not part of this. In the past year there has been discussion that we are considering aligning one of our curricula with the NGSS standards. Now, due to the pandemic, my job is undergoing a transformation. Ever hopeful, I am wondering how to start interjecting some of these concepts and activities into the process of these changes. I was in a meeting last week with colleagues and mentioned citizen science. Everyone paused and then someone asked, “What’s that?”. My path ahead will be steep…
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer

    @Edna Edna, these are good points! At my schools we have nice courtyards which would be great ecosystems to study during the school year using Project BudBurst.

  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    Which citizen-science project did your research? Provide a brief background. I did my research with Project Budburst. a national network of citizen scientists monitoring plants as the seasons change. When participating in BudBurst we watch for the key life events of a plant during the growing season. These events differ depending upon the type of plant but usually including leafing, flowering, and fruiting events. The study of these events is called phenology. Is the database accessible to anyone? Could someone who has not participated in the project use the data? Can students access the information? Budburst data is available for anyone to download and use.  A budburst account is not required for data downloads. Students can access the data. How might your students use this citizen-science project data to conduct an investigation? With the pandemic going on and our school system deciding to continue online only instruction through at least February 1, 2021 using Groups would be a way to have students participate in a class project even though we are all at home. We could add to the data as well as research the data on BudBurst to create a meaningful class project.
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    When I am working with students, I like to encourage their curiosity and questions by creating an atmosphere of trust and respect in the classroom. They know that their ideas are valued and that because I am the teacher does not mean I “know everything”. We all are striving to learn together. Often students come up with excellent insights and comments that enrich the learning experience and allow all of us to broaden our thinking. When these moments come up I embrace them and use them to direct my lesson to draw out more observations from my students. Now during the pandemic, as I am teaching into cyberspace on zoom or during a recorded lesson, I see the true value in the give and take I have with students in the classroom. And I miss it!
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    I agree that allowing this sort of exploration allows for deeper understanding and I also think the questions snowball once you start this process. Students love to learn, especially if their teacher is learning along with them, and if it becomes a shared experience of discovery. My students have come up with the best questions and insights during sessions like this!
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    Tamara, I also tried Budburst for this assignment and thought calculating the latitude and longitude of my location was rather difficult for a citizen science project. Then I discovered the screen where you put in your address and it calculates the latitude and longitude for you! Game changer! I even could zero right in on the plant in my yard, and put the map marker on it, with the Google map site that was provided. But I have to say the site is not intuitive or user friendly! It took me about 90 minutes of pressing every link and button to finally get my observation uploaded!!! I’m not sure this is a good option for my younger students.
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    I tried Budburst and I love the focus of their citizen science projects but I did not think the site was laid out well or user friendly. I had to access the site by typing in www.Budburst.org rather than finding a link on the website of the Chicago Botanic Garden (CBG), who they are affiliated with. I had to dig down into CBG’s website to even find a link to Budburst, and it was hard to locate. Once I made it through all that frustration discovered a hidden page where I could take my collected data and input it onto the site. I think they need to develop an APP for this project which would make collecting and uploading the data easier. I would need to work with this site more before I would suggest this project for a classroom because I think finding the data would be too confusing.
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    Alaina I agree with you. All this information and discussion is helping me to see that I need to be more aware of HOW I answer questions and foster discussion. Going forward I will be more sensitive to encouraging students to observe and find answers instead of me providing the answers or facts.
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    Thanks for sharing those great ideas Laurie! I work at a school that is a magnet for mobility differences and this inspires me to think more broadly about being inclusive. Also, your ideas would work well for our school’s courtyard garden because we are considering putting stations around the garden and these activities could be incorporated into the stations.
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    I have always struggled to stick to a lesson rigidly - which is what is expected of me when I teach. I have always encouraged students to ask questions and fostered a sense of curiosity. One time I was talking about gardening and the topic of worms came up. Several students asked questions about worms. I did not have the answers but said I could look them up and get back to everyone with the answers. Then one student raised her hand and explained to the class all about worms and answered all our questions. It was a great experience as we all learned together! Of course I didn’t cover all the material I had planned for that day, but I felt we learned something more valuable.
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    Kristen I like how you use this activity to let your students discover biodiversity and disprove their initial assumptions. Powerful! And also a great way for students that may be in a more urban setting to realize “nature” is not absent from their neighborhood either.
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    Thanks for sharing the back to back idea! I am going to add that to my list of activities for students to experience the outdoors in a new way and hone their powers of observation.
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    I had never made a sound map before, or even heard of this! I went out in my backyard, sat in a comfortable chair, closed my eyes, and listened. It was the noisiest cacophony of sound! I could not believe how noisy it was – layer upon layer of sounds! There were deafening cicadas buzzing extremely loud, all kinds of birds chirping and singing (I’m new to birding so I was not able to identify any of the birds by their song or sounds), cars on a local road nearby that were louder than I had ever noticed with one even honking, a dog barking, a person shouting, my fountain splashing, air conditioner fans running – all simultaneously. It was amazing! I know my students would enjoy doing this. And what is nice is that this is an activity that can be done anywhere. It can be done at school or at home this fall if students are still virtually learning. During the pandemic I have been learning more about being mindful and in the moment. This activity ties into that practice. It is an easy way to get students to be more mindful and aware of the world all around them by focusing on one sense – hearing!Sound Map - Pam Hosimer
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    Personally I plan to incorporate the “I wonder” boards into my teaching as much as possible. What a great tool – simple, low cost and able to be used with all ages! I am currently working on rewriting curriculum to adapt it for virtual learning and I may even be able to figure out a way to use the “I wonder” boards in that.
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    For me the positioning youth as people who do science would be the most important in my setting. The county I live in is focused on test scores and teachers are required to adhere to the curriculum and be sure all standards are taught with limited time for anything extra. STEM learning is part of the curriculum and this would allow students to do real science. And citizen science would be an additional option if time allowed.
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    Allison, I need to do more of the data collection too! That would be a good goal to strive for.
  • Pam
    Participant
    Pam Hosimer
    Linda, I agree that attending the unexpected connects with different learners. I was working in the garden with three of my students and one of them found an earthworm. The other two screamed! We then spent 15 minutes looking for more worms (we were supposed to be planting something…), discussing what it felt like to hold them in your hand, learning how to pick them up and being careful to not harm them since they were beneficial to our garden’s health. All three students were experts in worm-handling after that investigative experience. Next time I’ll have a better framework for that discussion after what I have learned here.
Viewing 20 posts - 1 through 20 (of 33 total)