Forum Role: Participant
Active Since: April 4, 2020
Topics Started: 0
Replies Created: 12

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)
  • Les
    Participant
    Lesbrandt
    This course has been fantastic. My second Warbler is definitely better although a bit hump backed, but I'm very happy with what I have learned. Proportions and drawing what I see are still two issues for me but I have made great progress and I will go back to start anew with the course.   IMG_0916
  • Les
    Participant
    Lesbrandt
    Went for a walk this morning. Thinking of sketching, but maybe not, it was super bright and getting hot. Came to this Datura, which I have always walked past because it is too complicated to try.  So I did walk past, but I came back, encouraged by what I have learned and by what you all do. Unfolded my little three legged stool and sat down, determined to show one of the hundred blossoms on the five foot wide plant.  My goal was to paint what I saw, not what I thought as normally happens and which usually ends in frustration. Because of a few trips outside to sketch I am slowly learning what I think I need, and I am filling the many pockets of a birding/artist style vest. After I drew with pen and ink I started coloring with the goal of showing the white blossom and stages of the plant.  While it is far from perfect, I did accomplish some of the things I hoped for.  Thanks for looking, and we can do this. IMG_0862
  • Les
    Participant
    Lesbrandt
    I experimented with all three techniques on this page of:  "Ok, what will I try next?" and with delight!                                  One of the important things I have learned is that life is too short to use cheap watercolor paper, or not even watercolor paper, and I still use stuff that makes good work all but impossible.  This is a page of Strathmore 400 Series Watercolor paper; it is not cotton base, but it is better than the note books I have been trying to use for watercolor.   IMG_0752
  • Les
    Participant
    Lesbrandt
    This was a labor that wore me out. I have never been successful at drawing and painting, primarily because I could never keep my attention focused long enough to complete a project ... ADD or whatever, but I stuck with it until I couldn't any longer. I am happy with what I accomplished, but I wanted it to be better, but I reached the point of No More so I quit. I have never followed a photograph that so clearly showed so many specific feathers and it was overwhelming. Matching colors is a beautiful mystery, so much to know and so many possibilities.  Thank you for looking.   IMG_0744
  • Les
    Participant
    Lesbrandt
    Learning to measure proportions has definitely been one of the biggest factors in improving my drawings. Observation, and taking longer than a very few minutes to finish, which has always been a huge problem for me.  If I didn't take much time I could always use that as an excuse.   IMG_0686  
  • Les
    Participant
    Lesbrandt
    Amazing what disorientation will do for drawing ability. IMG_0684
  • Les
    Participant
    Lesbrandt
    Blind contour miles ...... someone said you have to put in brush miles, or pencil miles ..... do it and keep doing it .... we will all get better. IMG_0678
  • Les
    Participant
    Lesbrandt
    Contour drawing requires absolute concentration. I try to go a specific distance to match a spot on what I am copying ..... doesn't always work, because I lose focus on how far I move my pencil. Becoming more proficient would allow me to get a more accurate sketch of creatures that are only still for moments.  Definitely helps me to stay focused   IMG_0677
  • Les
    Participant
    Lesbrandt
    This comparison of two plants brings more attention to detail and how the same part of two different plants can be so vastly different. The question of pollinators, who does it ... probably hummingbirds or specialized moths on the columbine but what about the tiny blossoms on the unidentified flower. Using words, numbers and drawings intensifies concentration.     IMG_0670
  • Les
    Participant
    Lesbrandt
    Not to say I am proud of everything on this page, but I am excited that I filled a sheet of paper with my learning. IMG_0256
  • Les
    Participant
    Lesbrandt
    Drawing from a photo is easier than in nature because I have time to compare spaces and angles.  I have a lot of trouble with beaks because I haven't practiced enough. I always see things when drawing that I never saw before.  Nature journaling makes me much more aware of my surroundings, whether it be a bird or a bee, a person or a tree. 7C647277-E62F-400B-A2A6-D136D1D33B77_1_105_c
    in reply to: Jump Right in! #694704
  • Les
    Participant
    Lesbrandt
    My inspiration for taking this course is my lifelong love of nature and a desire to learn to draw and record what I see. I think I was born with that desire but it was put on hold many decades ago when I was nine or ten and I was trying to draw a deer jumping across a log. My teacher looked over my shoulder and told me I shouldn't try to do that anymore because I couldn't. So I have motivation!  I also want to use what I learn to show young people all the things there are to appreciate in the outdoors and that drawing and painting does not have to be frightening and intimidating.  Love the ideas on how to compose pages and information, and to look at my journal as an experiment, not as something that will be judged, not by me or anyong else. I want to learn and have fun.
Viewing 12 posts - 1 through 12 (of 12 total)